Porsche is investing heavily in research and development to stay ahead of the company's impressive sales growth. Automotive News reports the German automaker is spending more than 10 percent of its revenue on research and development. That figure comes from Wolfgang Hatz, Porsche's head of R&D (for comparison's sake, automakers spend between five and six percent).

A main component of the spending splurge will see Porsche hiring more than 300 engineers in 2012 as part of an effort to increase the company's core staff by around 10 percent. Porsche hired a similar number of engineers in 2010 on top of replacing staff members who left as part of standard turnover.

Porsche is hard at work on the next-generation Cayman as well as the new 918 Spyder and the Cajun small CUV, all of which are headed to market in 2013. Previously, Porsche has made it clear the German sports car maker will create around 1,000 new jobs a year as part of its current business strategy.


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  • 18 Comments
      Seph
      • 2 Years Ago
      Let's see.. almost 150 of them are chinese, right?
        Zitao Liao
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Seph
        as a chinese engineering student i feel great you said so lol
      Rob
      • 2 Years Ago
      Excellent, now to convince Porsche that they need to hire an offshore structural engineer!
      • 2 Years Ago
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        • 2 Years Ago
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      • 2 Years Ago
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      Go
      • 2 Years Ago
      Lots of aerospace engineers getting pink slips soon -- Brush up on your German, folks! It's better to build Porsches than missiles anyways, I say.
        Dennis Baskov
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Go
        Why would Porsche need Aerospace Engineers?
          Big Rocket
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dennis Baskov
          @Dennis Baskov: Aerodynamics. Weight reduction. Structural rigidity. Just to name a few.
          Go
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dennis Baskov
          You obviously don't know anything about automotive OR aerospace engineering if you're wondering that. Mechanical engineering face similar challenges to aerospace nowadays. Ever heard of a material called "carbon fiber"? Just ask Martin Whitmarsh, principle of McLaren's F1 team: He came to McLaren from an aerospace background.
          Big Rocket
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dennis Baskov
          @Dennis Baskov: Mechanical engineering is a very vast field of study. Just as an example, aerodynamics is the study of airflow governed by equations very different from those governing the internal stress of load-bearing structures. Since no one mechanical engineer can be an expert in all these different specialties, companies hire engine specialists, suspension specialists, etc. Having said that, if an engineer can reduce the aerodynamic drag on a supersonic airplane, he can also reduce the aerodynamic drag on a fuel efficient car. And a lot of the lightweight composite materials you see in cars today were pioneered by aerospace engineers.
          Dennis Baskov
          • 2 Years Ago
          @Dennis Baskov
          @Big Rocket I would have thought that the Mechanical Engineer would have to know all that. I mean I'm not an expert at auto engineering nor designing by any means, but I wouldn't have though that an automotive company would need an engineer with entire different set of skills. Just questioned that out of curiosity...
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Go
        [blocked]
      guyverfanboy
      • 2 Years Ago
      Porsche Panamera diesel here in the USA please!
      Tripointkid
      • 2 Years Ago
      This is fantastic! However, will they continue to dumb down the performance of cars like the Cayman and boxster for fear of 911 cannibalism? This is an example of where business decisions affect engineering ones unfavorably.
        evannever
        • 2 Years Ago
        @Tripointkid
        You are correct about the de-tuning, but the benefit is that you can get a Cayman-R, which is an amazing car, for almost $20K cheaper than a base 911. If you invested that money you saved into learning how to drive well, very few 911's could keep up with you on a track. I, as the owner of a Cayman, am happy that I can drive a mid-engined sports car for SUV money.
      thedriveatfive
      • 2 Years Ago
      How many Porsche engineers does it take to screw in a light bulb... well it turns out...
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