Automotive industry analysts are projecting a better sales year in 2012. According to Automotive News, a number of culminating factors could see sales of up to 14 million units next year. That's thanks to factors like decreasing unemployment, improved credit availability and a larger portion of the population looking to replace older vehicles. Don't think that means the overall economy will be any stronger next year, however. According to the studies, buyers have simply grown more callous to news of repeated financial crises and aren't likely to let that news impact their new vehicle purchases. While the ink hasn't dried on 2011's sales figures, the national tally is expected to wind up somewhere around 12.6-12.7 million new car sales.

That view is largely based on a scenario that played out earlier this year. When Congress faced off over the nation's debt ceiling, the Dow Jones Index plummeted by 1,500 points. In the past, that would have translated into decreased auto sales, but the numbers have stayed steady this year.

Throw in pent-up demand from buyers waiting for sunnier economic times and more free-flowing credit and automakers may just meet the 14 million unit mark.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      clquake
      • 3 Years Ago
      Where are they finding all these employed buyers? It would be great to see the US economy as a whole get back on its feet, but until real employment improves, who's buying all these cars?
        BG
        • 3 Years Ago
        @clquake
        Good question. I see magnificent new SUVs and luxury trucks wizz by me on the interstate going 85+, and I keep wondering, "What recession?"
      lemonite
      • 3 Years Ago
      If I knew that I could get a decent trade-in value for my current car and at the same time wouldn't get ripped off on a replacement, I'd buy a new car. Otherwise, since I don't feel like dealing with haggling and researching negotiation prices, I will be driving my current car into the ground.
      elmo the dwarf
      • 3 Years Ago
      keep your old machines on the road rebuild and repair dont believe what the tv shows hawk out insurance rates are lower for old machines i have a 292 straight six with four hundred thousand miles on it its a chevy
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      elmo the dwarf
      • 3 Years Ago
      i have a 1983 mazda micro pick up runs great and killer good fuell milage screw the new no offence intended
      elmo the dwarf
      • 3 Years Ago
      i do not agree with new vehicle purchase i wouldnt buy any of them i can build better machines of of last years parts living in the past at a discount
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        clquake
        • 3 Years Ago
        This is a financial planners nightmare. You dipped into your retirement account to purchase something that will rapidly depreciate, rather than buying a used vehicle while unemployed. If I was your fp, I'd tell you to pick up a used one for now (or take public transportation if possible), upgrade to new when you have a job to minimize withdrawing from retirement. It's not just the taking of the retirement funds, it's the reduced future value and penalty (if you're not of age) that the IRS imposes as well, add 10% to your purchase price, that's the real price of your new car w/ penalty. You bring up your credit score, which only matters if you got a loan, and I'm not aware of any lenders that will give you a loan while unemployed...Well actually there are a few, but they should be shut down by the feds for lending to someone who can't pay back. I don't want to make you feel bad, but having been in the financial industry for a long time, I see horror stories, and life destroying financial moves all the time.