The Nissan GT-R has become something of a cult favorite for a number of types of enthusiasts: supercar slayers, import tuners, and especially track-day junkies. Particularly in the UK, where congestion (and a proliferation of speed cameras) prevents stretching out your car's legs, where there are legendary racing circuits abound and where, subsequently, Nissan has now rolled out a new Track Pack for the recently updated GT-R.

The Track Pack doesn't touch the engine, so the same 542-horsepower twin-turbo V6 applies. What it does provide is better cooling for the brakes with extra ducting front and rear, lighter six-spoke Rays alloys, a stiffer suspension (whose dampers can, of course, still be softened for road use), and an interior stripped of its rear seats and bolstered in the front for harder cornering.

Nissan UK is pricing the Track Pack at £10,000 ($15,000) on top of the £74,450 ($116,000) purchase price of a stock GT-R, and fortunately, the kit's addition doesn't preclude it from being driven on public roads. Although the package is currently only available overseas, we're hopeful that when the revised Godzilla makes its way to these shores, we'll have a chance to get our driving gloves on it as well. In the meantime you can check it out in the press release after the jump and the fresh batch of high-resolution images in the gallery.
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GT-R GETS HARDER WITH TRACK PACK

- Model Year 2012 line-up includes new track-focused edition
- Features designed to improve lap times
- Fully road legal, available to order now

The 2012 Nissan GT-R may well be one of the fastest cars in the world, but its owners are the most demanding in the world. So Nissan has developed a new version of the GT-R for drivers who want an extra edge on the race track.

Called 'Track Pack', this new version of the GT-R offers a harder edge and yet remains fully road legal.

Externally the Track Pack is easily identified by lightweight six-spoke RAYS alloys with gloss black painted centres.

The brakes behind these are cooled by additional cooling ducts built into the front bumper. These reduce the operating temperature of the front brake discs by as much as 100 degrees during track use, improving the stopping performance. Similar ducts, hidden behind the rear wheels, channel cooling air over the rear discs.

To reflect this GT-R's harder edge, the suspension's spring rates have been revised to be optimal for track use. Like all GT-Rs though, the dampers are adjustable to offer more comfort when the car is being used on the road.

Internally, Recaro front seats are trimmed with blue bolsters and an innovative high grip material to help keep the driver in place during hard cornering and braking. The rear seats have been removed to save weight. A 'Track Pack' emblem on the centre console identifies this model as a special GT-R.

The engine retains the same specification as the 'regular' 2012 model GT-R, which means 550PS of power. The 0-60 mph time is just 2.7 seconds.

The Track Pack adds £10,000 to the £74,450 list price of the standard MY2012 GT-R, making it £84,450.

Orders for all 2012 GT-R's can now be taken at any one of the 21 Nissan High Performance Centres around the UK. The first deliveries are expected in March 2012.


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  • 24 Comments
      tkosoccer03
      • 3 Years Ago
      remember when the GT-R was $75K? sigh... those were the days..
        Speed-Driven
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tkosoccer03
        UK pricing does NOT equal US pricing.
          tkosoccer03
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Speed-Driven
          your***
          tkosoccer03
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Speed-Driven
          what's you're point??? i don't understand... should i rephrase??? remember when the GTR was $75,000 USD? those were the days... (i'll add a little bit too to dive my point home) so where has the extra $40,000 USD come from?
        Sukairain
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tkosoccer03
        Cue second hand GT-Rs ; ) At 100k it's already vastly different price range than when it was first introduced.
          tkosoccer03
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Sukairain
          ya. IMO, it's destroying the GTR. it's no longer a bang for you buck car. and maybe that's what nissan wants. but i know that 3 years ago, there was no better car for you money, and that premise has been thrown out the window for some reason.
      WillieD
      • 3 Years Ago
      What an excellent deal. Pay them $15,000 to take out the back seats for you...
      Miguro Takahashi
      • 3 Years Ago
      $116K?? Nissan needs to be careful, they're cutting into what used to define it, ridiculous performance for under 6 figures. I know inflation is a bitch but still, they're slowing conceding what used to be its biggest advantage in the supercar market.
        Fermat1313
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Miguro Takahashi
        You can't just convert pounds to dollars and have price comparisons meaningful. In the US, car prices are lower than in most European markets and many other markets. For instance, a decently loaded BMW 135i (~$42k in the US) will run you about $94k in Australia, despite that fact that the USD and AUD are about on parity when it comes to exchange rates. In the US, the GTR starts at $90k. Not cheap, and about $20k more than the 2008 version, but a great value considering the cars the GTR will run with performance-wise.
        SAM
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Miguro Takahashi
        It starts at $90k in the US, straight off the Nissan USA website. You can not compare prices to other countries. For example, cars in Singapore go for roughly 3x the cost compared to the US. Yup, you could be paying over $70k US for a Civic in Singapore.
          Blake Grady
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SAM
          Why wouldn't one just buy the car from a different country and then ship it? Even if shipping were incredibly expensive it would have to be less than the price difference..
      Jiyakku
      • 3 Years Ago
      I would give it an A for effort but a C for execution. I was hoping Nissan would offer something like this to compete with what the other manufacturers offered but I also expected a "track package" to at least include some sort of tires similar to the Sport Cups on the ACR, ZR1, and GT2 RS. And those seats look like they would be on a Spec V Sentra, not a GTR.
      Shinkaze
      • 3 Years Ago
      As a GT-R owner (2009) I am have some suggestions. Give me a transmission/diff cooler, plus if you're going to remove the rear seats then an optional 4-point roll cage with proper race harness and racing shells would be far superior to those neat blue seats. This is where Nissan really needs to pay attention to what Porsche offers the GT3 track day customer.
        Sukairain
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Shinkaze
        Well, putting a roll cage in the GT-R will pretty much kill its resale. Also you should know that roll cage is ONLY safer for drivers and passengers if you plan to wear a helmet every time you drive thereafter. GT-R Differential cooler you can get through Nismo. 4 or 5 point harness I do agree with for the track package. Yeah srly, what's up with those seats, they look like they belong in a Big Block muscle car.
      Oliver
      • 3 Years Ago
      A more than 10% increase in the overall price for just this sh*t. How many times does an average gtr owner actually go to an autocross or trackday? Probably not enough to justify setting your money on fire. More expensive and still about as attractive as a Lane Bryant model. Oh, but its faster than a 911 Turbo. No thanks.
      Oliver
      • 3 Years Ago
      This article fails to mention if the GPS-based governor is recalibrated. If you have the money to spend the equivalent of $116k (not to mention dealer markup) on a high performance machine, do you actually want to spend more money to get an aftermarket ecu bypass. If you told a potential 911 turbo buyer that he can drive as fast as he wants, but nor more than 112 mph (gtr governor), do you think you would still want to hand over an additonal 15k dollars? Good luck selling this package Nissan.
      Oliver
      • 3 Years Ago
      This article fails to mention if the GPS-based governor is recalibrated. If you have the money to spend the equivalent of $116k (not to mention dealer markup) on a high performance machine, do you actually want to spend more money to get an aftermarket ecu bypass. If you told a potential 911 turbo buyer that he can drive as fast as he wants, but nor more than 112 mph (gtr governor), do you think you would still want to hand over an additonal 15k dollars? Good luck selling this package Nissan.
      Hatzenbach
      • 3 Years Ago
      "and fortunately, the kit's addition doesn't preclude it from being driven on public roads" and unfortunately Nissan still doesn't allow us to drive it on a track without voiding the warranty but i guess their claimed laptime for the track package version is somewhere south of the 4 minute mark
      ShutoSteve
      • 3 Years Ago
      So this basically sounds a lot like the SpecV version... Same wheels, same front splitter, same rear seat deletion, same suspension and brake cuts - the only thing this car is missing is a slight bump in HP - which is easy enough to do in a GT-R.
      Sukairain
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yeah how much for just the Track Pack badge and the front splitter with carbon fiber insert?
      Dennis Baskov
      • 3 Years Ago
      I thought the stock GTR costs around $90k now!? Nissan increased the price again?
        TwinTurbo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dennis Baskov
        The price increase is mostly because of the GT-R being built in Japan and he US dollar tanking versus the Japanese Yen.
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