Toyota is flush with buzz surrounding the company's new 86 sports car, and that could translate into additional performance models if the vehicle's chief engineer has anything to say about it. The Sydney Morning Herald reports that Tetsuya Tada, the mind that brought the Toyota 86 to life, believes there's room in the stable for two additional sports cars. Tada is quoted as saying that while the 86 is a mid-sized sports car, he'd like to see one vehicle positioned below the boxer-powered coupe as well as an additional model slotted higher in the lineup.

The latter machine could potentially be a successor to the Supra, complete with a high-horsepower engine and rear wheel drive. Like the 86, that vehicle would be another collaborative project between Toyota and Subaru. Unfortunately, Tada is quick to say that nothing has been decided as of yet. Keep your fingers crossed.


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  • 108 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      mitytitywhitey
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just throw the turbo-boxer in this car. Subaru has lots of them, of varying horsepowers and torques. And it shouldn't be the hardest thing in the world to get one of Subaru's STI transmissions to put all the power to the rear (sans center diff).
      scotthureau
      • 3 Years Ago
      After Toyota ended the 2JZ legacy, they kind of screwed the pooch in terms of a road map for tuner cars. We ended up with good but unfriendly V6 engines / platforms that don't encourage tinkering. Meanwhile, Evos, Subies and BMWs are looked at as solid platforms, with plenty to offer. HPFP and injector issues aside, the BMW N54 is the closest we've got to that legendary 2JZ. Times have changed but I wish Toyota had stuck with the inline-6. At one point Toyota even had a high efficiency/ high compression -FSE variant that had DI and fast burn combustion chambers. It never came to the states and was rare, but would have been cool to work with.
        Travisty
        • 3 Years Ago
        @scotthureau
        One of the biggest problems was the move away from forced induction on stock vehicles. There's only so much you can do with I/H/E and remapping the electronics before you have to add F/E to something that didn't have it before. Modifying a stock F/E setup isn't hard (look at all of the chipped VWs out there), but *adding* it to something is quite a bit trickier. The second problem is producing a vehicle that can put that power down to the ground. Even the 2.4 block in the '05-10 tC ended up able to push out 350+ hp from some of the turbo kits, but when the engine is in a somewhat portly FWD econo-coupe, it's not exactly going to set the world on fire...
      RevenantDC5
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sub-86? The whole idea with the 86 was to make the cheapest RWD sports car they could. Anything cheaper won't be a real sports car. Their sub-86 sports car already exists in the form of the Scion tC.
        bonehead
        • 3 Years Ago
        @RevenantDC5
        according to the quote above, they may be meaning smaller than the FT-86 and not necessarily cheaper. "Tada is quoted as saying that while the 86 is a mid-sized sports car, he'd like to see one vehicle positioned below the boxer-powered coupe" so hopefully below in size and not price/features.
        PikeAndPine
        • 3 Years Ago
        @RevenantDC5
        good point!
      Jonathan Arena
      • 3 Years Ago
      Idiots... Leave it to Toyota to be suprized at the popularity of a real, simple, modern sports car for very little money.
      Eddie Dwyer
      • 3 Years Ago
      Didn't they say the same thing about a new Supra 4 years ago?
      rmkensington
      • 3 Years Ago
      I think Toyota is realizing that you need a "Halo" car that helps the brand look more exciting. The Lexus LFA does nothing because its too overpriced and changes are 99% of people will never even see one. Despite not contributing huge amounts of profit Ford still keeps the mustang and Chevy the Corvette. Its something exciting to get people into the showrooms even though they might buy something else more practical.
      Ron
      • 3 Years Ago
      IF....... Toyota comes our with a high HP Supra, Ill sell my C6 Corvette and get one. Although the Vette is scarey fast , the build quality SUX
      Amco Autoglass
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'll put my deposit down now if the Supra gets confirmed.
      Hazdaz
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wouldn't put too much hopes in them coming out with 1 more sportscar, let alone 2 more. This is an Engineer talking... of course he WANTS for that to happen, but The Suits and the beancounters are the ones that decide if its economically feasible for them to do so. If the GT-86 sells at a higher volume than expected, then maybe they'll release a Supra successor, but that's a big IF. There have been many of cars over the years that enthusiasts seem to love (or at least online they say they do), but when the car actually gets released, it fails to get the sales everything was saying it would have.
      aa
      • 3 Years Ago
      Or just put a twin turbocharged direct injected Subaru H6 3.6 liter into the 86..
      JR
      • 3 Years Ago
      Supra successor YES
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