• Dec 2, 2011
A rare storm system working its way from the west coast has caused millions of dollars in damage, left many without power and spurred fires from California to Colorado. According to USA Today, wind speeds reached as high as 123 miles per hour, or the equivalent of a category three hurricane. In Eldorado County, California, a total of seven fires burnt more than 130 acres as the harsh winds whipped fueled the flames. In Southern California alone, 350,000 people lost power due to downed lines. Of that number, 270,000 were still in the dark as of Friday morning.

Meanwhile, in Utah, authorities temporarily closed Interstate 15 after ten semi trucks toppled over in the heavy gusts. Meteorologists are calling the wind storm one of the worst in recent history, and while the winds have died down significantly since they first made landfall, the storms are expected to make their way toward Oklahoma, Missouri and Indiana. Hang on tight.

Scroll through our above image gallery to see some of the automotive carnage that resulted from this storm system.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      Guy Inkägnētō
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yep, that's my hood. I've never experience wind like that here in Utah in my 20+ years living here! Hundreds of uprooted trees, blown off shingles, aluminum siding and stucco stripped off of households, wooden fences completely destroyed...it looked as if a tornado passed through! http://a6.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-ash4/386488_153973818038094_100002764308280_168735_237065186_n.jpg
      EB110Americana
      • 3 Years Ago
      I drove in this on the 210 freeway in Pasadena and it was a lot of work to keep in my lane at 65mph--and that's in an aerodynamic car with fat tires. I remember thinking the semi's must be barely drivable. Traveling on surface streets was even worse. We have a lot of trees in Pasadena including palms, and there was debris everywhere from rooftop tarpaper tumbleweeds, to trashcan lids, to palm fronds, to giant branches popping up and blocking half the street when least expected. I have never seen anything like this in my life. At least we have power again after being without it for about 15 hours.
        dukeisduke
        • 3 Years Ago
        @EB110Americana
        Hang in there, man.
          EB110Americana
          • 3 Years Ago
          @dukeisduke
          Thanks. The worst of it is over for us. Most of the damage was done on Wednesday night and early Thursday morning. By about noon on Thursday the winds were much diminished and presently it's pretty calm. Now it's simply a matter of cleaning up the mess, putting back up the fences, and putting out the fires here.
      dukeisduke
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow, pretty amazing. Hope no one gets seriously injured.
      AcidTonic
      • 3 Years Ago
      Scooby-Z? But it's a tanker, I don't see the Subaru badge anywhere......
      New Shimmer
      • 3 Years Ago
      You should have posted a the picture that was taken right after the picture of the truck on it's side. It was a picture of a bunch of cows sneaking away, giggling.
      mbenz12
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just another day here in wyoming. they close interstate 80 due to wind, as well as many other highways outside of laramie on a regular basis. Just in the past 2 months ive seen about 3 trucks flipped due to wind.