Suzuki hit the 2011 Tokyo Motor Show with a small flotilla of green-minded vehicles, including the Swift EV Hybrid. According to the company, most Swift buyers travel between 12 and 18 miles per day, so engineers designed this range-extended EV to cover that distance on pure electric power. A small-displacement internal combustion engine remains on hand to take over charging duties should the driver deplete the vehicle's batteries, just like in the Chevrolet Volt. Suzuki says that the design has several advantages over a traditional electric vehicle.

For starters, the system uses a significantly smaller battery than a full EV, which means the Swift EV Hybrid uses fewer resources and costs less. It also takes less time to charge than a full EV as well. While we don't expect to see this doorless wonder on the streets any time soon, Suzuki may apply the range-extender technology to production models in the future.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      goodoldgorr
      • 1 Month Ago
      Is it a serial hybrid or a parralel hybrid because a parallel hybrid cost more and weight more and also i prefer a serial hybrid like the volt from chevrolet that is a serial hybrid and might sell for cheap used in the next couple of years.
      EZEE
      • 1 Month Ago
      The Nissan Leaf and Chevy Volt are not impressed with 10 - 12 miles. If the car is substantially cheaper (which is not mentioned in the article), that might be a positive, as well as if the MPG's while the engine is running are especially high (which is not mentioned either).
      Aaron Gleason
      • 1 Month Ago
      No doors. That's one way to reduce weight... I keed, I keed...
      Ford Future
      • 1 Month Ago
      Japan is setting itself up as a Hybrid world leader. This will significantly reduce Japanese oil exports if implemented on a wide scale.
        Marco Polo
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Ford Future
        "Japan is setting itself up as a Hybrid world leader." Er,.......Japan isTHE world Hybrid leader!
          EZEE
          • 1 Month Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Japan...USA...Korea? Europe, with their diesels, has been slow, but of course, one could count nissan as European...
        EZEE
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Ford Future
        good point - good for them as they do not have much oil of their own...
      Spec
      • 1 Month Ago
      Leaf clone.
        EZEE
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Spec
        You can tell it isn't the leaf, but the doors.... :D
      Neil Blanchard
      • 1 Month Ago
      If this is a serial / series hybrid and doesn't have any mechanical connection between the ICE and the wheels -- and if the ICE runs at a constant RPM to charge the battery at it's peak efficiency -- then it is *not* just like the Volt. Personally, I think a serial /series hybrid is the way to go, and it should be more efficient than a parallel hybrid (like the Hondas, though there are other variations) or a multi-mode hybrid (like the Prius and the Volt), all else being equal. So, it will be good to hear more details on this car, and see how well it works in the real world. Neil
        Chris M
        • 1 Month Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        Series hybrid is simpler and easier to implement than parallel or series/parallel "split path" hybrids, but it is NOT more efficient, as the energy conversion losses are greater. While a series hybrid might be a bit cheaper, I doubt the modest reduction in price would be worth the reduced fuel efficiency.
          Neil Blanchard
          • 1 Month Ago
          @Chris M
          I think it would be more efficient, actually -- don't forget that an ICE "likes" to run at a constant RPM; that is where it is the most efficient. So, if you have the ICE mechanically driving the wheels, yes the transmission itself might be more efficient than the genset, but the ICE can rarely run at a constant RPM, and lots of energy is wasted. In a serial / series hybrid, the electric motor(s) vary in RPM, but they have a very "flat" efficiency curve. The ICE can be much smaller displacement (since it only has to meet the *average* load) and it uses the battery as a buffer. So, a smaller ICE running at a constant RPM can be designed to run at peak efficiency at that RPM, and it doesn't need a torque broadening valve set up, etc. It warms up quickly, has a smaller cooling system, and a smaller fuel tank; saving weight and having lower drag because the cooling air flow is less. So overall, the serial hybrid (done right) can be very efficient. Think of it as allowing the ICE to run in "highway" mode only without ever needing to vary it's RPM and shift gears and run off-peak. A serial hybrid uses an electric motor in the way it runs best, and an ICE in the way it runs best. And on average, I think a serial / series hybrid can get better efficiency than an parallel hybrid or a multi-mode hybrid. Neil