With everyone predictably swarming over the Toyobaru Twins here at the Tokyo Motor Show, one bit of performance geekery has been largely overlooked.

Toyota brought out the second iteration of its MR-S/MR2-based GRMN Sports Hybrid Concept, with an all-new look, more carbon fiber and a reworked hybrid powertrain. The standard 2ZZ four-cylinder (or lesser 1ZZ in the States) has been swapped out for a 3.5-liter V6 mounted amidships and outputting 247 horsepower. While that's not much juice from a big V6, the addition of an electric motor powering the front wheels brings overall output up to just under 300 hp, allowing the 3,300-pound roadster to run to 60 mph in the mid-five-second range.

If you're wondering about the name, it's an acronym for "Gazoo Racing tuned by Meister of the Nürburgring," referring to Toyota's ace test driver, the late Hiromu Naruse. Along with the Lexus LFA Nürburgring Edition, this was the final vehicle Naruse-san worked on before his untimely demise, and it's one of maybe three vehicles at the show that we'd drive home tomorrow given the chance.


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  • 47 Comments
      Marko343
      • 3 Years Ago
      I Like it, Proportions look off but not bad. The car is most likely a actual mr2, I have a Mr2 spyder and I recognize interior pieces, the dash is the same, the middle map compartment, glove box, even the hvac controls with clock is all mr2 spyder lol.
      wave9x
      • 3 Years Ago
      Friggin' awesome styling. Finally an automaker shows something intriguing as well as aesthetically pleasing.
      Brett
      • 3 Years Ago
      Front bumper/headlights reminds me of the Toyota 2000GT. Love it!
      Dwight Bynum Jr.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Whenever I see this car, I think it looks more like a design from TVR than Toyota. Hmmm...
      Scooobaru
      • 3 Years Ago
      The MR2 Spyder never came with a 2zz in the U.K. or Japan either. It's just a very common swap. I hate to say it, but I like the original concept better. At least then they weren't trying to hide the fact that it's the same MR2 they came out with in 2001 (in the U.S.) that just weights an extra 1000 lbs. Wonder how much faster it would be if they just put the V6 in the original 2200lb body and left everything else. http://www.autoblog.com/2010/01/15/tas-2010-toyota-mr2-sports-hybrid-concept-packing-400-hp-3-3-li/
      WillieD
      • 3 Years Ago
      Interesting...to say the least. But in a way I like it.
      Temple
      • 3 Years Ago
      Forgot to mention its also AWD. 3,300lbs is pretty good for a AWD hybrid V6, which obviously has to carry a V6, electric motors, battery, and AWD bits. But it makes you appreciate the GT86/BRZ for being 2,700lbs. Though you have to wonder why the 3.5 V6 makes only 247hp in this car while 268hp in the Camry, and 306hp in a Lexus GS. You would think they could have gotten the combined power (with hybrid system) to around 350hp instead of 300hp.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Temple
        [blocked]
          EXP Jawa
          • 3 Years Ago
          The SAE definition (thus industry standard) of AWD is a vehicle in which all wheels are capable of being driven. By rights, if the front wheels are electrically driven and the rear IC driven, then it still qualifies. AWD does not dictate the use of an LSD or lock to be considered as such. For the record, I design/develop/test AWD systems and LSDs for a living. What's more, very, very few more conventional AWD systems allow for 100% of torque to be transferred from front to rear on demand. That requires a lock feature - like a traditional truck transfer case. Anything else - even driver adjustable clutch couplings - has less then 100% locking effect, and transfers less than 100% of available torque.
          EXP Jawa
          • 3 Years Ago
          For starters, let me point out that what's relevant to an AWD system is torque transfer - not power transfer. Also, a system with a fixed 50/50 torque split never moves torque around. If it did, the torque split would shift from 50/50, and you described that split as fixed. When you send all torque to one axle, that distribution hits 100/0 (or 0/100). Now you can use that as a start point, and an active clutch can add to that. I think that is what you're alluding to. Or you can have a biasing differential that does it based on torque reactions at the axles without active controls. But with an active system, you're using an on-demand clutch to create your extra torque transfer, and with a biasing differential, you can potentially generate a high locking effect / torque bias ratio, but you still fall short of a lock. Clutches - active and otherwise - always have a slip limit that restricts how much they actually transfer. High-powered performance cars can easily generate 5-6000 N*m of torque to the wheels if traction allows, and on-demand couplings rarely exceed 1200-1500 N*m in capacity. So although it *does* typically put the torque where it needs to be, even if the clutch locks as hard as it can, it isn't a true, rigid lock, and it can't allow *all* the torque that the powertrain has the potential to generate to reach the wheels. So, I stand by what I said - very few vehicles on the market have the ability to actually generate 100/0 torque splits.
      stclair5211
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can we trade the scion FRS for this??? At least it's a real sports car with more than 151lb ft of torque and it looks fantastic and different - in a good way.
      Turbo_S60
      • 3 Years Ago
      Please Toyota give us a real MR2. I know hybrids the future but rather have small mid engine 2 seater with a small supercharged 4cyl.
      Eugene Leafty
      • 3 Years Ago
      It looks like it was designed in the 90's.
      WindsWilling
      • 3 Years Ago
      To quote everyone's favorite drill sergeant: "WHAT IS THAT.... W. T. F. IS THAT"? This thing is hideous, and not sleek like the MR2 at all, and is even uglier than the MR-S. You know Toyota, I appreciate that you're trying to get your 80's and 90's passion for cars back, but please put some proper effort into them. This thing should be a REAL ultra light weight mid-engine 2-seater. To get with the trends, it should have a 1.6-1.8L turbo engine with output in the high 200's or 300hp. I'm really scared for the Supra, which was the pinnacle of affordable Sports Cars of the 90's. I mean, the MKIV was SO good I'd hate to see what happens.
      G
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wonder why they went with a 3.5 V6? Could of easily got the same HP with a four with less the weight.
        AcidTonic
        • 3 Years Ago
        @G
        Not sure why you're being modded down. Hell 270hp by todays standards is considered "normal" for a turbo 4 banger. The Evo FQ400 came stock with a factory warranty and 400hp from a 2.0 I4. Base Evo's have 300hp from the same motor. Lesser cars are hitting 220 to 270 from a 2.0 turbo. Your comment was spot on and on topic. But you offended Autoblog apparently.
          Elmo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @AcidTonic
          Base Evos have 291hp, before that it was 286hp. Also, turbo plumbing, intercooler, and the turbo itself will make up the weight difference between the V6 and the I4.
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