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The 1994 Honda Accord tops the list for most-stolen veh... The 1994 Honda Accord tops the list for most-stolen vehicles. (Honda)
Ever wonder why the 1994 Honda Accord tops the list of most-stolen vehicles?

Police in Washington state don't: They know it's because those cars are pretty easy to steal.

Car thieves only need a ground-down Honda key to help gain access to most other Honda cars. In Kitsap County, Wash., 50 Honda vehicles have been stolen since June, and a dozen since Oct. 25.

"Every time we have a new stolen (car), I ask if it's a '90s model Honda," Port Orchard police commander Geoffrey Marti told the Kitsap Sun. Twenty Hondas have been stolen from Port Orchard this year.

The 1994 Honda Accord was the No. 1. stolen car on the National Crime Insurance Bureau stolen cars list released in August, and topped the LoJack stolen vehicles survey released in April.

Of the 52,000 Honda Accords stolen in 2010, more than 44,000 were 1990s models. Less than 6,000 were made in the 2000s.

When the pieces are broken out, the parts are worth more than the cars. The fuel line for a 1994 Honda goes for about $375, the air conditioner compressor sells for around $350, and an antilock brake part sells for around $450. Just those three parts $1,175. Comparatively, Kelley Blue Book says an excellent condition four-door 1994 Honda Accord is valued at around $1,900.

But Hondas aren't the only popular cars out there. The 1991 Toyota Camry also tops the list of most-stolen cars, and six of the top stolen cars come from domestic brands.

As this Denver story points out, sometimes thieves are brazenly putting cars on flatbed trucks and driving away with them.

Police in Denver are using a technology AOL Autos' Translogic highlighted earlier this year, scanning license plates to check every car a police vehicle drives by to see if it's been stolen. A cluster of stolen vehicles can alert police that a chop shop may be nearby.

Police say if you're driving a car that thieves tend to want to steal, a simple device like a steering wheel club can deter thieves, who are often looking for the easiest vehicle they can nab.

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  • 422 Comments
      f4180
      • 3 Years Ago
      " I ask if it's a '90s model Honda," Port Orchard police commander Geoffrey Marti told the Kitsap Sun." Yup , that's what you call bonafide good police work .
      lglasst1964
      • 3 Years Ago
      The easy solution to this problem is to drive a stick shift, I have a 90's Honda Civic and no one bothers to steal it because they don't know how to drive a stick, which kills me because it isn't hard to drive.
        joehennes
        • 3 Years Ago
        @lglasst1964
        That's not why I drive a stick, but it sure is a nice benefit... :)
        • 3 Years Ago
        @lglasst1964
        Hilarious and true!
      pozboys
      • 3 Years Ago
      One thing puzzles me, "why would you pay $375.00 for a part for a vehicle that is only worth $1900.00, or less, depending on condition?? With labor, etc tacked on, you would be paying almost half of what the car is worth, just to fix it!! Not a good choice ,of how you are spending your money!!!
        jmenor3
        • 3 Years Ago
        @pozboys
        Because fixing your old car is always cheaper than buying a new one. Repairs may cost Hundreds, but buying another car costs THOUSANDS. Money most people don't have.
      michaelb006
      • 3 Years Ago
      I guess that Honda believes that everyone should drive a Honda.
      ultraclen2
      • 3 Years Ago
      steal them and burn them......... BUY AMERICAN CAR FOLKS OUR COUNTRY IS BROKE
        tmachine2
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ultraclen2
        There are so many people out there that think Honda is an American brand because it's assembled here. They'll say anything to justify their purchase. They should do research on how many taxpayer subsidies, massive tax breaks, and free land they got. How they avoid U.S. import quotas and tariffs by assembling in the U.S.? How much profits and taxes off those profits stay in the U.S.? How many UAW jobs and other jobs they killed setting up shop here?
          joehennes
          • 3 Years Ago
          @tmachine2
          Sorry, the most logical thing to do is drive the best car at the best price. If a foreign car manufacturer can build a better car, spend the money to ship it to the US, and then still sell it for less than a domestic car manufacturer, then the US needs to get out of the business of making cars and find something to manufacture that they don't suck at.
        on1wheel750
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ultraclen2
        our country is broke due to american car builders farming out all the work to other countrys, electronics and susp from mexico comp from china etc then paying corp exec ridiculous amounts of money to produce the worst vehicles and then the govt to bail them out only so they can screw the economy and file fo bankruptcy ,,,,,,,,germany produces and builds everything they need. they only import raw materials, buy GERMAN,,,,,,,,buying american only supports the countrys we farm everything out to (the ugly truth)
          tmachine2
          • 3 Years Ago
          @on1wheel750
          There is very little truth to your comments. GM, Ford, and Chrysler are still headquartered in the U.S., pay more property taxes and taxes to the Treasury, employ thousands more Americans than the foreign transplants, and still use the most domestic parts (on average) than the foreign transplants. In Germany, they use some Asia parts, too. However, in Germany, they didn't allow their manufacturing sector die, like we did. Also, Germany is a protectionist country that won't let it's market get saturated with foreign brands, like we do. If you go to Germany, what will you see on the road? German cars because German people are nationalistic, like we used to be. We have become a country of consumerists and looking for the cheapest brand. The Big 3 did have quality problems for many years, and they overpaid their CEO's. Welcome to America. However, their quality has matched or beaten the imports, and a lot of workers took a haircut to keep manufacturing in the U.S. As much as you may not want to hear this, but we need the Big 3 for economic and national security. So, buying American brands does a lot more than the foreign brands couldn't even dream of in the U.S., so you were spewing an ugly lie.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Thats hilarious Machine Man!
      • 3 Years Ago
      I would love to buy an American car, if I could find one that did not fall apart and spend all it's time in the repair shop. There is a reason Toyota is the #1 selling car in America.
        • 3 Years Ago
        had a '92 Saturn that had 5 alternaters, and everything else go wrong. I now own a '06 Honda that has had no problems in 6 years
        j.kasza
        • 3 Years Ago
        You got that right! I got a 2000 solara with 150,000 miles. Have not spent a penny except oil changes. Japanese engineering is still years ahead in terms of durability and reliability.
      • 3 Years Ago
      jap junk serves the owners right
      Robin
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sharon thy name is betty.
      fords74
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have a 1974 Ford XLT Ranger, brough it brand new for 4400. It still runs good, same engine and manuel trans. Nedds a paint job, which I will give it soon. Beats the foreign cars on repairs or tune up's . Go old american cars or trucks if you can find them. lolol
        • 3 Years Ago
        @fords74
        I think Rangers and Mazdas are pretty much the same truck. I had an early 80's Ranger and had the shift level housing break, shift lever and part of the top of trans came off. Anyway the replacement part came from Mazda. The Ford store didn't have one. Pretty good truck, no match for the Hummer that t-boned it though.
        sebestpepe
        • 3 Years Ago
        @fords74
        And I have a 1993 Honda Civic with 491,000 miles and have never had to go to the dealership a single time, except for regular maintenance...
          shiloh1388
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sebestpepe
          And I have a 77 Dodge Diplomat 318 V-8 with 1, 223, 500 miles on it. Just before their K cars. Chrysler rocks.
          norats8
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sebestpepe
          gezzz, you lie, the timing belt on them only last to 90,000-125,000, let only all the other cheap parts that go out at 150,000. At 180,000 miles you'd be loosing a quart of oil just starting it,lol.
          cregar5pack1
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sebestpepe
          yea, i have a 1977 gremlin with 699,000 on it too, never been to a dealer.
      Ghetto Cat
      • 3 Years Ago
      If you're driving 1 you're already speaking Japanese.
      LindyK
      • 3 Years Ago
      They can have those jap cars
        The-O-Door
        • 3 Years Ago
        @LindyK
        Who can have those jap cars? What are you trying to say? Please make some kind of sense. Unless it's too much for you to handle.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @LindyK
        got that right man, I love my Jeep, but it's old, I wouldn't touch a new one......stupid europeans/US politicians.........Ruined Jeeps for me :(
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