We haven't heard about the Volkswagen Law in a while, but that doesn't mean the EU Commission has forgotten about it. The law gives the state of Lower Saxony, with a 20.1-percent stake in VW, veto rights on a takeover deal, which means no one's ever going to take over VW because its home state won't allow it. The law came in handy when Porsche was working to gobble up Volkswagen. The law was struck down by the EU Court of Justice in 2007. Germany then scrapped the old VW Law but rewrote another one that gave Lower Saxony the same rights with different legalese circumventing the spirit of the court's decision.

The EU competition oversight body is taking Germany back to court over the law, but wants to put some pain into the judgment: it wants Germany fined €31,000 ($41,000 USD) per day for every day since the original 2007 judgment. It also wants the court to issue a second ruling, and if Germany doesn't bring the law into line with the ruling, the EU Commission wants Germany fined €282,725 per day (nearly $375,000) until the Germans comply.

No federal German authorities have responded to the latest EU thrust, but the premier of Lower Saxony offered this: "Doesn't Europe have better things to do?"


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  • 17 Comments
      Gryzon
      • 3 Years Ago
      Pointless meddling is all the EU is capable of. Just a few months ago they were wasting time promoting a blanket 30 kph (18.64 MPH) speed limit for all residential zones and even urban areas that don't have dedicated bicycle lanes. (ie: pretty much everywhere) They also considered mandating new road signs across the whole of Europe just so they can all look identical, since that's what bankrupt countries should be spending money on right now...
        Myself
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gryzon
        If you want to vent out your frustrations with the EU, do it in an intelligent way. Otherwise off you go to the Daily Maul or the Daily Torygraph. 30 kilo of what per hour? As any half-witted person knows, "kph" is NOT an abbreviation for kilometers per hour (km/h) because "k" is not short for kilometer. "k" is short for kilo, meaning 'thousand'. I do not care if 'kph' is used as a colloquial abbreviation in "imperial" countries and I don't care that it's used by BBC F1 commentators - they're not that great anyway. Disclaimer: I'm not a metric junkie, I still measure tires and TV screens in inches.
          Krishan Mistry
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Myself
          Grramer Nazi
          Gryzon
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Myself
          Thank you for that insightful commentary on the VW Group and EU regulation! :D
          buckfeverjohnson
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Myself
          Funny you mentioned tires since they are measured in millimeters and inches.
      IBx27
      • 3 Years Ago
      And that's why you don't let other people govern your government. The EU has been leeching off Germany since they started.
      stclair5211
      • 3 Years Ago
      Goodbye sovereignty hello NWO. How is this different than us giving control of our parks over to the UN? (look it up, it's happened. The signs are up in TN) It's not. They want a one world government and to tell everyone and everything what to do.
        mavsguy842
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stclair5211
        So voluntarily joining a group and agreeing to a set of rules, and then being asked to abide by those rules by the group you joined is a sign of a NWO and one-world government? That's quite a stretch. Both as it relates to Germany and the EU, and the United States and UNESCO.
      SloopJohnB
      • 3 Years Ago
      Agreed. The VW law is stupid and anticompetitive.
      MAX
      • 3 Years Ago
      So Volkswagen is "Government Motors" too? It can't be!!
      John Ashfield
      • 3 Years Ago
      Isn't Germany basically bailing out the EU? You think the EU would cut Deutschland some slack!
        Fatoid
        • 3 Years Ago
        @John Ashfield
        I wouldn't be surprised if this is just a means for the Germans to continue to bail out the EU without looking like it is doing so to domestic voters and perhaps certain financial markets. German taxpayers may object to funding the slacker countries in the Eurozone, but paying "fines" over this non-issue may go unnoticed.
      buckfeverjohnson
      • 3 Years Ago
      While I hate the idea of the Euro Zone, it is a sound judgment for calling out anti-competitive practices. Along this lines I would love the US to implement reciprocal trade practices so that Chinese companies could only own 49% of American companies since that is all that foreign nationals can own in China, Korea, Japan, Russia, etc.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @buckfeverjohnson
        [blocked]
      eyalny
      • 3 Years Ago
      they should give the company back to the British government. how could the EU Commission tell something to the German government, isn't it the same thing?
      Alex
      • 3 Years Ago
      Another fail from the EU. Where will that money VW has to cough up go? Hopefully to Suzuki, as compensation for the falling out ;)
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