The flavors of Lexus GS on offer in Europe will differ slightly from those here: we will both get the GS 450h, but we'll only step down to the GS 350 for an entry-level model, while the Europeans will make do with a GS 250 housing a 2.5-liter V6. That smaller-capacity sedan is meant to challenge the BMW 520i and Mercedes E250, but Lexus is reportedly planning an even more frugal drivetrain for the UK to challenge even more popular competitors: diesel executive sedans.

The BMW 520d SE automatic gets 60.1 imperial miles per gallon combined, and the Audi A6 2.0T Multitronic gets 56.5 imperial mpg. According to Autocar, the estimated fuel economy for the 2.5-liter V6 in the 2012 GS 250 is just 35 imperial mpg. Giving up 20 mpg, even of those smaller English gallons, is a huge disadvantage.

But Lexus doesn't do diesels, so it's developing what is thought to be a four-cylinder lump hooked up to an electric motor, putting out 180 horsepower combined. That would put it right in between the BMW and Audi outputs, but fellow UK publication Auto Express suggests a 50 mpg rating, perhaps due to an almost-certain weight penalty. The exact details on the hybrid setup should come "imminently."


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 14 Comments
      aatbloke1967
      • 3 Years Ago
      "Giving up 20 mpg, even of those smaller English gallons, is a huge disadvantage." An Imperial gallon is approximately 1.2 US gallons, Autoblog.
      Beddu
      • 3 Years Ago
      Lexus DOES do diesels - IS200D
        guyverfanboy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Beddu
        I never even know that Lexus had a diesel IS....
        Kai F. Lahmann
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Beddu
        yes, one if the three Lexus models which are sold in relevant numbers (=more than 10 per month) in Germany. The other two are the CT200h (as being the average size in German market) and the RX450h (as being very efficient in theory).
      kevin
      • 3 Years Ago
      so they're going to hook up the GS with the 4-cyl engine from the camry hybrid? Just guessing, from the 180 hp or so output projection.
      axiomatik
      • 3 Years Ago
      Imperial gallons are larger than US gallons. That is why mpg figures are higher for imperial gallons, you can go farther when you start off with more fuel.
      guyverfanboy
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow... Lexus is sure at a disadvantage in that segment! Why not have a diesel drive train to compete in that segment?
        zamafir
        • 3 Years Ago
        @guyverfanboy
        Because they have no base in europe, because their primary market is the us, because their wagon is hitched to the hybrid horse which sells very well in the US and not so much overseas. Because, quite simply, they were invented a little over a decade ago for the US market and are slowly beginning to realize there are other markets out there. Trouble is, no one's as picky as a european customer, and offering a model like the GS without a FUN diesel option will insure it's as DOA as the is200D.
          axiomatik
          • 3 Years Ago
          @zamafir
          Small comment: Lexus has been around for over 20 years, it's first car was introduced in 1989.
          Kai F. Lahmann
          • 3 Years Ago
          @zamafir
          Don't worry, other car makers coming from the US market have the same problem. All of them build cars, which are way to big, overpowered and way to inefficient. Everything bigger than a Mercedes C class powered by a ~2l diesel engine with less than 150 hp just isn't relevant in Europe. Top selling cars are Volkswagen Golf and Ford Fiesta, both with about 100 hp.
      Kai F. Lahmann
      • 3 Years Ago
      And even with 50 imperial miles per gallon nobody will buy it. But I don't expect Toyota to understand why. To be interesting the _highway_ rating (as that is, where the long distances are done!) needs to be *at least* 10% _better_ than for a diesel (because diesel is about 10% cheaper).
      Gubbins
      • 3 Years Ago
      Whatever it may be fuel efficiency-wise, please add mud-fence ugly to the list.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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