Drivers on the Pennsylvania Turnpike were met with a sticky surprise Tuesday night after a tanker trunk with a leaky valve spilled between 4,000 and 5,000 gallons of a tar-like goo all over the highway. The spill, initially characterized as tar, was later revealed to be a driveway sealant.

Some 150 cars were disabled as a result of the incident, but fortunately no injuries or serious accidents were reported. Road workers got on the job shortly after the spill, covering the spilt sealant with sand and pushing it off onto the shoulder with snow plows.

The spill affected a 40-mile stretch of the eastbound portion of the turnpike, between New Castle and Oakmont, and principally the right-hand lane. However, some motorists on the scene wondered why officials hadn't closed down the highway completely as they were met with ice-like driving conditions that severely inhibited safe driving. Follow the jump for the video report from the scene.



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  • 26 Comments
      - v o c t u s -
      • 3 Years Ago
      THIS STUFF IS ALIEN LIFE-FORCE! CALL FOX MULDER!
      Matt
      • 3 Years Ago
      What i want to know is, how did this guy drive FORTY MILES without being alerted to the problem or pulled over???
        mchlrus1
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Matt
        To answer that how could a police car or other car catch up to it if it's spraying tar out? It's hard to find a truck spraying tar at night, in the rain. Trust me, it was a hard rain. 40 miles is like 50 minutes in a truck. That's not that much time for police to be allerted and to catch up to he or she.
          mchlrus1
          • 3 Years Ago
          @mchlrus1
          Woops sorry AGILIS I didnt realize how redundant my comment was. I only read Matt's post.
      metalmatrix7
      • 3 Years Ago
      I live a half hour outside of Pittsburgh and knowing PENNDOT, I'll be surprised if this is fixed in 2 years.
      Fat Stig
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'll bet money that the trucking company doesnt pay a DIME, they are usually immune to damage they cause by negligence.
      budwsr25
      • 3 Years Ago
      Need to stock up on some WD-40.
      ssbjohn
      • 3 Years Ago
      let it set up for a while and get an extra 10,000 miles on your tires
      Christopher Anderson
      • 3 Years Ago
      Moar grip for racing. Because Racecar.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      m5nm3
      • 3 Years Ago
      The company and driver should buy all the drivers new tires, the hassle of going to get tires replaced, and repair of the highway.
        Agilis
        • 3 Years Ago
        @m5nm3
        Not just the tires, but some sort of professional clean up will be in order. If I'm correct, the best way to remove driveway sealant/tar is to use gasoline since the stuff is made with oil.
      Mitesh Damania
      • 3 Years Ago
      40 miles!
      Nathan Loiselle
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm confused. How does a sticky substance cause ice-like driving conditions? Ice is slippery. Also. Why didn't the road workers just push the tar down the road and use it to do some extra sealing? :)
        flychinook
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nathan Loiselle
        Pour a few bottles of Elmer's glue on your kitchen floor, then do jumping jacks on it. You'll get the idea. Thicker liquid makes for easier hydroplaning.
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