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Here's a fun fact: According to Mobile Future, the connected car is the third-fastest growing technological device in the world, falling only behind smart phones and tablets. If that's not proof that personal transportation is falling ever more heavily into the appliance realm, we don't know what is.
Toyota
is looking to get ahead of that trend by partnering with Intel on a joint research project designed to yield its next-generation of infotainment systems. Intel says that the company has been researching vehicle connectivity for years now, and that it hopes the new partnership with Toyota will produce more seamless smart phone integration.

That makes two of us.

But the project won't just focus on improving current technology. Intel also says that the two corporations will investigate ways to integrate vehicles with owners' homes. What does that mean, exactly? We have no idea, and chances are it will be at least a year or two before we find out.
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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

* Intel and Toyota engage in leading-edge research to enable new usage models for mobile device connectivity in the car.
* Joint research to focus on developing user interaction methodologies including touch, gesture and voice technologies as well as information management for the driver.
* The connected car is the third-fastest growing technological device, following smartphones and tablets.


SANTA CLARA, Calif., Nov. 9, 2011 – Intel Corporation and Toyota Motor Corporation today announced that the companies are working together to define next-generation in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems that will enable new usage models for mobile device connectivity in the car.

According to Mobile Future, the connected car is the third-fastest growing technological device, following smartphones and tablets. With the car becoming an extension of today's digital lifestyle, Intel and Toyota are working together to adapt features that drivers and passengers use in the latest consumer electronic devices to an automotive environment.

"Intel has been conducting research related to the connected car for years, and with the support of Toyota will extend that research to advanced services that will benefit the driver and passengers in many ways," said Staci Palmer, general manager of Intel's Automotive Solutions Division. "Through this joint effort, we hope to improve the driving experience by enabling a seamless connection between mobile devices and the vehicle so when brought together they naturally adapt and work in harmony."

As technology converges with the car, silicon solutions serving the infotainment and telematics market are expected to rise from $5.6 billion in 2010 to $8.7 billion in 2018.1 Intel and Toyota aim to integrate advanced technologies in the vehicle in a more intuitive manner that reduces driver distraction. To accomplish this, the companies will focus research on developing a user interaction methodology including touch, gesture and voice technologies as well as information management for the driver. Intel will also work to optimize these features and services using the performance of the Intel® Atom™ processor family.

"Toyota aims to lead the future mobile world through integration of vehicle, home and information communication technologies as announced in the 'Toyota Global Vision' earlier this year," said Kenichi Murata, project general manager, Electronics Development Div. 1, Toyota Motor Corporation. "Toyota, along with Intel, will use information technologies to drive innovations into the vehicle to make the vision a reality."

The companies will also explore emerging connectivity technologies and effective ways to integrate vehicles with the home to provide a seamless connection across all areas of people's lives.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 18 Comments
      Walt
      • 3 Years Ago
      Toyota? Get ahead of a trend? Please. Toyota has never brought a new innovation to market. Ford is the leader in this category.
        Klinkster
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Walt
        Yeah Ford is hardly a leader...unless your backward's definition of leadership includes using customers as guinea pigs for broken dual clutch and Sync-less technology using the King of BSOD. A real leader would (should?) have held back and made sure they got it right before ramming trivial technology down customer's throats with intent of fixing it later (like other dumb-arse technology companions). I wish I could drive into the Ford dealer and return this technology in the Focus.
          Walt
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Klinkster
          It's such a laugh, a day has gone by and still no invention by the Japanese automakers that they didn't first borrow (steal) from Europe or Japan. The greatest challenge of the 21st century will be to stop the flow of technology invented here from being copied by Asian countries. Where does Toyota have its U.S. research facility again? Why were it can quickly steal and copy what Detroit automakers come up with of course - in Detroit! LOL!
          clquake
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Klinkster
          So Walt, despite being presented with evidence that Japan is one of the leaders of modern technology, you still post that? Clearly you have no idea of the everyday technology available in the Asian countries. South Korea & Japan are among the leaders and innovators, but if you need to sleep comfortably at night, then just keep living in your blissful ignorance. The US is WAAAAY behind the technology curve.
        Carlos Cruz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Walt
        How is Ford a leader? They took a prepackaged product from Microsoft Automotive and called it Sync, big deal.
          clquake
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Carlos Cruz
          A badly prepackaged product that required a major update.
      IBx27
      • 3 Years Ago
      That makes two of you and none of us. We need less smartphones in our cars.
      LUSTSTANG S-197
      • 3 Years Ago
      I read news like this and I feel like everyone is developing Autism. Is it really that hard to put down the gadgets long enough to drive somewhere? Call me old fashioned, but I actually enjoy driving and being aware of my surroundings. Why do cars need all this crap?
      Omar
      • 3 Years Ago
      Crtl +Alt+Supr......F1, F1, F1 !!!
      Eyhk
      • 3 Years Ago
      All you yoddles and your phancy schmancy info tainment systems! Back in my days, we had A cassette tape to listen to all our favorite songs and had to rewind them with our fingers just to listen to the song over again, AND WE LIKED IT!
        LegacyLunatic
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Eyhk
        So true. I like the part about rewinding with fingers :p
        Jason Allen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Eyhk
        Did you like using your outhouse and wiping with a sears catalog too? I assume you'll die soon,old fart, so stop being so grumpy about real, tangible progress. Put on your "I like Ike" button and get in your casket. Thx, or rather, thanks.
      clquake
      • 3 Years Ago
      I was talking to a relatively new driver last week. He was driving to a new location and asked me how to get there, and being the tech geek I am, I printed out google maps. He looked at them like I handed him something written in a lost language from 2000 years ago. He said he meant how does he program in the the address into his new sat nav. (turns out his car didn't have sat nav). Is this where we're headed? Inability to read maps and too dependent on technology to the point you're paralyzed if it doesn't work?
      LegacyLunatic
      • 3 Years Ago
      Honda + AMD??
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