Here's a fun fact: According to Mobile Future, the connected car is the third-fastest growing technological device in the world, falling only behind smart phones and tablets. If that's not proof that personal transportation is falling ever more heavily into the appliance realm, we don't know what is.

Toyota
is looking to get ahead of that trend by partnering with Intel on a joint research project designed to yield its next-generation of infotainment systems. Intel says that the company has been researching vehicle connectivity for years now, and that it hopes the new partnership with Toyota will produce more seamless smart phone integration.

That makes two of us.

But the project won't just focus on improving current technology. Intel also says that the two corporations will investigate ways to integrate vehicles with owners' homes. What does that mean, exactly? We have no idea, and chances are it will be at least a year or two before we find out.
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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS

* Intel and Toyota engage in leading-edge research to enable new usage models for mobile device connectivity in the car.
* Joint research to focus on developing user interaction methodologies including touch, gesture and voice technologies as well as information management for the driver.
* The connected car is the third-fastest growing technological device, following smartphones and tablets.


SANTA CLARA, Calif., Nov. 9, 2011 – Intel Corporation and Toyota Motor Corporation today announced that the companies are working together to define next-generation in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) systems that will enable new usage models for mobile device connectivity in the car.

According to Mobile Future, the connected car is the third-fastest growing technological device, following smartphones and tablets. With the car becoming an extension of today's digital lifestyle, Intel and Toyota are working together to adapt features that drivers and passengers use in the latest consumer electronic devices to an automotive environment.

"Intel has been conducting research related to the connected car for years, and with the support of Toyota will extend that research to advanced services that will benefit the driver and passengers in many ways," said Staci Palmer, general manager of Intel's Automotive Solutions Division. "Through this joint effort, we hope to improve the driving experience by enabling a seamless connection between mobile devices and the vehicle so when brought together they naturally adapt and work in harmony."

As technology converges with the car, silicon solutions serving the infotainment and telematics market are expected to rise from $5.6 billion in 2010 to $8.7 billion in 2018.1 Intel and Toyota aim to integrate advanced technologies in the vehicle in a more intuitive manner that reduces driver distraction. To accomplish this, the companies will focus research on developing a user interaction methodology including touch, gesture and voice technologies as well as information management for the driver. Intel will also work to optimize these features and services using the performance of the Intel® Atom™ processor family.

"Toyota aims to lead the future mobile world through integration of vehicle, home and information communication technologies as announced in the 'Toyota Global Vision' earlier this year," said Kenichi Murata, project general manager, Electronics Development Div. 1, Toyota Motor Corporation. "Toyota, along with Intel, will use information technologies to drive innovations into the vehicle to make the vision a reality."

The companies will also explore emerging connectivity technologies and effective ways to integrate vehicles with the home to provide a seamless connection across all areas of people's lives.