2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S group photo

  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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  • 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S
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Vital Stats

Engine:
3.8L Flat-6
Power:
400 HP / 325 LB-FT
Transmission:
7-Speed Manual
0-60 Time:
4.3 Seconds (est)
Top Speed:
189 MPH
Drivetrain:
Rear-Wheel Drive
Curb Weight:
3,075 LBS
Seating:
2 + 2
Think Your Job Is Stressful? Try Redesigning The 911



The world's most iconic sports car, the Porsche 911, is redefined about every seven years. This is no easy feat, as each new model must not only conform to ever tightening emissions, fuel economy and safety regulations, but must be faster and more competitive in motorsports. The 911 remains one of the most successful racing cars ever built, and for many, it's not just a sports car from Porsche – it is Porsche.

Now, an all-new seventh-generation Porsche 911 Carrera has been unveiled. While the rear-engine replacement lacks serious controversy (the move from an air-cooled flat-six to water-cooled powerplant more than a decade ago was dreadfully traumatic), the new Type 991 presents altered proportions to improve passenger comfort, handling and stability. But don't think for a moment that the 2012 model has gone soft. It is much more dynamic and capable than its predecessor. To substantiate the fact, Porsche divulges that its all-new Carrera S is capable of lapping the Nürburgring's Nordschleife circuit in just 7:40 minutes. Not only is that 14 seconds faster than last year's 997, but it matches the time of the race-ready Type 997 GT3. And that's just the start.
Stuttgart has calculated that 272,811 Porsche 911 models have been delivered to customers in the United States since 1970. While that is one boatload of smiling Americans, the statisticians didn't stop there. The Germans also declared that in excess of 700,000 copies of the iconic sports car have been delivered worldwide since its launch in September 1964, and more than 80 percent of those Type 901, G-Model, 964, 993, 996, and 997s are still street legal. While the Porsche 911 is 48 years old, the all-new seventh-generation, known internally as Type 991, carries the legacy significantly forward. Like most late-model 911s, the 991 will eventually be offered in Turbo, Cabriolet, Targa, GT3 and GT2 variants, and most all should be in place within the next two years. But first, Porsche is launching the 911 Carrera Coupé and the 911 Carrera S Coupé.

Compared to last year's 911 model, the new 2012 911 is .98 inches longer, .20 inches shorter in overall height and it has a wider track. Those dimensional changes are rather insignificant when compared to the wheelbase, which has grown by a whopping 3.90 inches. Putting more space between the wheels has shortened the front and rear overhangs and put more of the engine's mass in front of the rear wheels. As a result, the 991 benefits from a lower center of gravity, improved stability at speed and more room carved out for passengers.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S side view2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S front view2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S rear view

From 100 yards, only a Porsche purist will be able to distinguish a 991 from the 997 – that's a compliment to the design team that worked exhaustively to maintain the 911's traditionally characteristic appearance. Step a bit closer, maybe 30 feet away, and the changes are much more evident. The characteristic round headlights remain, but they have been pushed wide. The radiator intakes are larger with wrap-around LED directional indicators and the side mirrors have been moved from the mirror triangle at the base of the A-pillar to the top of the door (a location shared with the automaker's Panamera sedan). The front windshield is flatter while the rear quarter windows are more tapered. The rear spoiler is now integrated cleanly with the decklid when stowed, but it presents a larger surface area when deployed. Overall, the appearance is more aggressive than that of the outgoing model while bearing more than a slight resemblance to the Carrera GT from the rear.

The new interior also takes many of its cues from its siblings, with the most notable change being the arrival of a tall center console, again mixing the design characteristics of the sporty Carrera GT with the luxurious interior of the Panamera. Directly in front of the driver, Porsche's familiar five-ring cluster houses six analog gauges (tachometer, speedometer, oil pressure, oil temperature, water temperature and fuel level) and a new color TFT multifunction display to the right of the centrally-located and oversized tach. The navigation screen sits at the top of the center console, just below two of the four dash vents. Directly below are the NAV and audio controls. The console flattens out at that point, and the climate controls are in the crease with a monochromatic display of temperature settings for both driver and passenger. Just aft is the transmission shifter, whether manual or automatic, at a near-perfect height and distance from a relaxed arm. Lastly, a slew of buttons are located beneath the driver's right elbow, controlling suspension, traction control, exhaust, rear spoiler, sunroof and other optional equipment.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S interior2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S gauges2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S instrument panel2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S center console

The new chassis utilizes McPherson struts up front, with a lightweight aluminum support bearing, tuned to enhance anti-dive performance under heavy braking. The rear axle is a completely new multi-link design, with more spring travel to improve performance and new elastic rubber-metal bearings to reduce rolling noise. Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM), a damping system for active and continuous control of both axles, is standard on the 2012 Carrera S Coupé and optional on the base Carrera Coupé.

New is Porsche Dynamic Chassis Control (PDCC), an optional variable stabilizer system that replaces the traditional anti-roll bar drop-link with four active adjustable strut-mounted hydraulic cylinders. During straight-line driving, the PDCC is essentially disconnected to prevent wheel impacts from being transmitted across the chassis. However, PDCC immediately engages to prevent chassis lean when sensors detect any lateral forces.


Porsche has taken a risk with the steering by ditching its traditional hydraulic steering system and replacing it with an electro-mechanical system that is engineered to only use energy during steering maneuvers. Aside from the obvious benefits (less parasitic drag on the engine, simplified machinery and improved fuel efficiency), the system features active self-alignment and a stabilizing system to improve control while braking on surfaces with uneven grip.

Capable cast iron brakes are standard on both models. The Carrera is fitted with 13.0 x 1.1-inch perforated and ventilated discs up front, with four-piston aluminum monobloc calipers painted black. The Carrera S receives slightly larger 13.4 x 1.3-inch perforated and ventilated discs up front, with new six-piston aluminum monobloc calipers in red. Both the Carrera and Carrera S share the same 13.0 x 1.1-inch perforated and ventilated discs in the rear, with four-piston aluminum monobloc calipers (color-keyed to the front calipers). The Porsche Ceramic Composite Brake (PCCB) system is optional, shaving nearly half the mass off the standard braking system and nearly eliminating brake fade. The PCCB calipers are painted yellow, of course.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S wheel2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S raised spoiler2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S badge2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S exhaust tips

Standard wheels on the Carrera are 19-inch alloys, wearing 235/40ZR19 tires in the front and 285/35ZR19 in the rear. The Carrera S is fitted with 20-inch wheels as standard equipment, with slightly larger 245/35ZR20 tires up front and 295/30ZR20 rubber out back. Pirelli P Zero tires, specially designed for the 911, are standard on the new 911.

Mounted behind the rear wheels on the 2012 Carrera Coupé is a 3.4-liter, flat-six, rated at 350 horsepower at 7,400 rpm and redlines at 7,800 rpm, while the all-aluminum direct-injected engine generates 287 pound-feet of torque at 5,600 rpm. Although downsized from last year's 3.6-liter flat-six, the smaller-displacement direct-injected engine generates slightly more power and identical torque while delivering improved fuel economy.

The 2012 Carrera S Coupé boasts the familiar 3.8-liter flat-six. While the displacement is identical to last year's engine, Porsche reworked the intake and exhaust on the new model to capture an additional 15 horsepower and provide a slight bump in torque. Rated an even 400 horsepower at 7,400 rpm, the all-aluminum direct-injected powerplant generates 325 pound-feet of torque at 5,600 rpm. Sharing the same redline and fuel cut-off at 7,800 rpm with its smaller sibling, the naturally-aspirated 3.8-liter engine delivers an impressive 105.3 horsepower/liter. We expected two transmission choices: manual or automatic. But this is where Porsche threw us a curve.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S engine

The automaker's seven-speed Doppelkupplungsgetriebe (PDK) was a no-brainer, as the electronically-controlled double-clutch automatic transmission delivers blazingly clean shifts whether in standard or sport modes (Porsche says 70 percent of its customers will choose the PDK). Improved for 2012, the PDK gearbox now delivers even faster and smoother shifts and it completely disengages itself to reduce drag and improve fuel efficiency during coasting.

Earlier this year we learned that Porsche was also offering the world's first seven-speed manual transmission in a passenger car. Consider it a PDK gearbox adapted for human use. Instead of electronically-controlled clutch plates, the 7MT uses a traditional third-pedal clutch. As humans are less precise and more prone to slipping the engagement, the clutch is larger in the manual box than in the PDK. Furthermore, to prevent the operator from inadvertently shifting from fourth into seventh during spirited driving, there is a sequential shift lock that keeps the overdrive gear out of reach until fifth or six gears have been previously selected. The gear ratios of the manual mostly match that of the PDK, but Porsche has outfitted the stick shift variant with a taller third gear and a shorter seventh gear to improve driveability.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S paddle shifter2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S PDK shifter2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S manual shifter

Thanks to an extensive use of aluminum (the roof panel, deck lid, door skins and fenders are all made from the lightweight alloy), Porsche has been able to offset the mass of the added safety components and new standard equipment. On the scale, the 2012 Carrera models have shed about 100 pounds when compared to their predecessors. The curb weight of the 2012 Porsche Carrera Coupé with the seven-speed manual is only 3,042 pounds. Add the optional seven-speed PDK and the weight climbs to just 3,086 pounds. The 2012 Porsche Carrera S Coupé tips the scales at 3,075 pounds with a manual gearbox, and weighs 3,119 pounds with the PDK. Regardless of the configuration, the new 911 Carrera is lighter than a Chevrolet Corvette Z06 (3,199 pounds), Ferrari 458 (3,274 pounds), Nissan GT-R (3,829 pounds) and the Jaguar XKR (3,865 pounds).

According to Porsche, typically very conservative with its figures, the standard 911 Carrera with a seven-speed manual transmission is good for a 0-62 mph sprint in 4.8 seconds. Configured with the optional PDK gearbox and the Sport Chrono package, it adds the launch control function, the time drops down to 4.6 seconds. The Carrera S with the manual gearbox is slightly quicker as it hits 62 mph in about 4.5 seconds. The fastest model is the Carrera S with PDK and the Sport Chrono package. Porsche says it will sprint to 62 mph in just 4.3 seconds and we fully expect it to shatter the four second barrier once instrumented testing gets underway. Thanks to a slippery .29 drag coefficient and a complete absence of top speed limiters, the standard Carrera Coupé will comfortably hit 180 mph if allowed the opportunity. The more powerful Carrera S Coupé will run to a top speed of 189 mph.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S Sport Chrono

Porsche invited us to Santa Barbara to put a couple hundred miles on a 2012 Carrera S Coupé. After a quick breakfast, we grabbed the key to a Racing Yellow Carrera S with Yachting Blue leather and a PDK gearbox. Driving a coupe that was arguably brighter than the rising sun, we set the standard navigation system to take us north to Santa Maria.

The cabin was impeccably appointed in our test car, with quality leather, soft Alcantera or smooth aluminum trim covering nearly every exposed inch. We sat very comfortably in the cockpit, with plenty of head and shoulder room, behind a thick sport steering wheel. Distinguished by its aluminum spokes and lack of auxiliary controls, the round wheel was equipped with large alloy paddle shifters in the proper configuration (Porsche still offers the frustrating Tiptronic-era sliders on the standard leather wheel).

After turning over the flat-six with the left-mounted key, we released the new electronic parking brake, which is awkwardly located next to the driver's left knee, and then moved the PDK shifter into D and headed out.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S driving

The first half of our trip was up the San Marcos Pass, or State Route 154, just north of Santa Barbara. The two-lane road lazily travels at highway speeds up and over the mountains before dropping into the Santa Ynez Valley. Stuck mid-pack among a row of vehicles without any legal passing opportunities, we focused our attention on the new electric steering – this was admittedly our primary concern. It does feel slightly different, maybe lacking some of the smallest vibrations, but no less accurate or precise. We could feel the bumps, the rocks and the road kill (already flattened, of course). We were fixated on the steering for about 15 minutes, digging hard to find something annoying, but we couldn't. Then we forgot about it; it became a non-issue.

What did capture our attention was the responsiveness of the flat-six engine, the quickness of the PDK and the stiffness of the new lightweight chassis. Despite having "just" a six-cylinder with 325 pound-feet of torque, the Carrera S was a rocket when roused. The dual-clutch gearbox jumped gears like it was playing schoolyard hopscotch to provide near-optimal engine revolutions at speed regardless of how poorly we were caught off guard (yeah, it makes us humans look a bit slow). Smooth as a traditional slushbox on the highway and around town, without a single errant rattle at low speeds, the Porsche's Doppelkupplungsgetriebe is a bat-out-of-hell with deadly aim when pressed into service. If the 911's PDK isn't the world's finest automatic transmission, we don't know what is.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S driving

After arriving at Santa Maria airport, where Porsche had paved its own test loop in Top Gear fashion, we were encouraged to flog the all-new Type 991 as hard as we dared, as long as we kept it on the pavement (most of us did). We used the opportunity to do multiple launch control starts to about 115 mph followed by highly abusive full-ABS stops. Porsche brakes, even the standard iron units, are among the best in the industry. After we found ourselves consistently stopping too short, we'd brake later and later without any worry of fade. A 911 is at home on a race circuit, so it didn't even pant at the exercise.

We then immediately ran the coupe around a short handling course with curves and wide decreasing radius sweepers. With the PDK in Sport Plus mode, the newest Porsche rewarded mid-corner throttle lift with predictable chassis rotation. Despite the lengthened wheelbase, turn-in seemed quicker and sharper than it was in last year's Type 997. The new coupe was not only bloody quick around the improvised circuit, but it was also very predictable and impressively fun – exactly what we expected from a 911.

Parking the yellow PDK-equipped model on the paddock, we talked our way into yet another Racing Yellow Carrera S. However, this particular model sported the new seven-speed manual transmission. Slower than the PDK, but much more involving, we chose to head back to Santa Barbara using the longer and more enjoyable... um, scenic route.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S driving2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S driving

In less time than it takes to soft boil an egg, we forgot about the near-perfect shifts of the PDK and fell head over heels for the manual gearbox. The clutch pedal felt slightly springy at first, but only took a few engagements to become second nature. Soon, the action was almost faultless as the gears snapped quickly into place. The action was smooth, yet rewardingly mechanical. We ran up the gears sequentially, clumsily slower than the dual-clutch would do the same task, and quickly ran back down the pattern in reverse order. Our favorite gear, without question, was third. That middle gear pulled strongly from 35 mph to nearly 110 mph, meaning it is a perfect fit for nearly every back country road in the Continental United States. Seventh gear, that awkward new arrival, is geared so tall as to be positively boring (we tried it a couple times for grins, and then never went back).

Over the next two hours, we rolled the windows down and darted through the rolling hills using second, third and fourth gear exclusively. Light on its feet, the 911 obeyed all of our commands as we happily collected misguided bugs on our front fascia. Throttle, clutch, shift, throttle, clutch, shift and throttle. The flat-six wailed at redline, blaring through the optional sport exhaust, and the sound ricocheted off the rows of vineyards. The experience of piloting a fine instrument developed exclusively for the driver was purely emotional. By the time we arrived back in Santa Barbara, our smile was so wide that it bruised our cheekbones.

2012 Porsche 911 Carrera S rear 3/4 view

Liquidate your prized belongings and sell the family heirlooms. Porsche has announced pricing. When it rolls into showrooms on February 4, the standard Carrera Coupé will carry a base price of $82,100 (plus $950 destination). The Carrera S Coupé will start at $96,400 (plus destination). Build one like our yellow test model and you are likely touching $120,000. It is top shelf pricing, but we can't think of another new vehicle in that dollar range capable of delivering the equivalent build quality, comfort or performance. The 911 has always been, and continues to remain, a true driver's car for a discerning affluent buyer.

Back in Weissach, the Type 991 design team led by Michael Mauer should be taking a stress-free vacation in the Caribbean for a job well executed. But they won't. More variants are waiting in the wings, and let's hope Porsche waits a few weeks before reminding them that the Type 992 is due in 2018.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 120 Comments
      Autoblogist
      • 3 Years Ago
      AB, do us a favor and stop taking videos. Of all the sh*t to show us on that car, you guys decide to show a video of how the sunroof operates?
        miketim1
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Autoblogist
        I agree the videos are pointless... A FULL VIDEO REVIEW of the car would actually be better along side the written review.
          wants ls wagon
          • 3 Years Ago
          @miketim1
          So true. The Kmart ad I had to watch first was almost as long as the shortcut about that sunroof, which isn't even that cool.
      Smooth
      • 3 Years Ago
      The 911 is an icon, same as the Corvette. When you've made one nameplate continuously for almost 50 years, while others have come and gone, you're not making a name for yourself anymore. The name is made. You can stay the same, change it up or just refine and mature. I really love the evolution of this car. It's always been nice looking, but this one is the right mix of sexy and smooth. It's a 911. Some people don't get that concept. There is a reason why Porsche bases their WHOLE lineup off of a car whose look debuted in the 1960s. It's THEE Porsche. It must be instantly recognizable as a 911 when you see it. Mission accomplished. Want radical all new design? Look elsewhere. To those saying the car is overpriced, don't buy it. it's that simple. If the price is not to your liking that meant it wasn't for you from the get go. You knew what manufacturer you were at when you pulled up to the dealership. Porsche doesn't do cheap, bargain, etc. They do expensive a la carte, not a value menu.
      simianspeedster
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is officially my dream car. There are very few cars I'd want as much or more at any price. -- It's everything you want in a sports car and nothing you don't. Wife in the passenger seat, dog in the back! -- It's practical and civil enough to use every day, but it gives up nothing on the performance front. -- It's eminently classic yet thoroughly modern. -- It's gorgeous. Damn I want me one of these! -- It has the technology you want, but it doesn't overwhelm you with technology -- it still comes with a MANUAL TRANSMISSION!!! -- It's built extremely well. -- It has soul that other cars dream about. Of course each of us have different priorities and tastes, but some of the negative comments about this car are so juvenile and uninformed that they're not worth responding to. If you can't appreciate how Porsche has refined this car over the decades to keep it both classic and extremely competitive, you don't recognize brilliant engineering. Just move on and buy something flashy and temporary -- there will still be plenty of us yearning for the real thing.
        lewazzinaroillus
        • 3 Years Ago
        @simianspeedster
        simianspeedster,...you are my new hero!!!,...absolutely spot on in everything you say,...and i, like you,...am so happy that porsche still makes this thing in a manual!,...just can't fathom NOT getting the manny tranny for this car!,...and totally agree with you about the "juvenile'"comments about it's look!,...i mean please, why would porsche mess with what, now going on 50 years of design perfection?,...do the naysayers realize that that shape is arguably the most recognized shape in automotive history?!,...even kids know it at 7 years old!,..they either say, "beetle", from whence it is derived,...or "911"!,...porsche would be suicidal to change branding like that!,..you can't buy that kind of recognition, and i, like most porschephiles, would be horrified if they ever changed that iconic shape,...and to all the other fan boys of other cars,...i love other cars too!,...but you do realize that this is still the car by which all other sportscars are measured against,...including the nissan gtr,...it was benchmarked against the 911 turbo,...awesome car,...but THEY TOO realized that the 911 is the "big cahoona" in this game,...and it's the one to beat,...they do it back and forth,...911 beats the gtr one year, then the gtr comes back to reclaim the crown,...i love that they both acknowledge the greatness of each others cars by default!,...either would be awesome,...but for me the deal breaker is that i can get the 911 in a manual!,...that's just me,...but i want to be more involved in the ride at that price point!...
      Justin Campanale
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'd like to see this "budget supercar " class expand. I'd like to see ressurections of the M1, NSX, SVX, etc etc.
        Xedicon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        The 1M isn't enough? It's right on the M3's ass in most cases for a whole lot less money, hehe. I agree with you though. What I would DIE for would be a 6.4 Hemi stuffed into a small RWD two door coupe from Chrysler. A genuine Mustang / Camero competitor but doesn't weigh more than 3500-3600 lbs, with a price ranging from high 20s for a stripper verion to low to mid 30s for something with some plush. I need to stop now, getting lost in the most amazing day dream in my head! Oh no! My brain just made it mid engine! Oh yes! Push button start! Manual SIX SPEED WITH A METAL GATE! A tiny touch of oversteer! Complete bypass of all electronic aids! Optional exhaust pass through like on the Boss 302! Oh yeah baby! YEAH!
          Lachmund
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Xedicon
          this bodibulider wearing a thong called 1M is surely no comparison to the always classy 911
        Mike B
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Justin Campanale
        Budget supercar is an oxymoron.... Now to the point, cars like the NSX and M1 were entry level supercars, if they were to be resurrected they'll go against the likes of the MP4 and 458 not a base 911 Carrera.
      Dan Murphy
      • 3 Years Ago
      Another well written article Mr. Harley. I believe you to be the best automotive journalist in NA. Quick question: if you were given the option to drive one car for a year which would it be & why? The choices are: Aston Martin v12 Vantage, Audi R8 5.2 or the 2012 Porsche Carrera 4S. All manual transmission cars.
        Michael Harley
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Murphy
        Thanks Dan. I am sucker for the Aston Martin V12 Vantage, and I'll tell you why... The V12 Vantage is special because it is a car that will never be built again. It has a massive naturally-aspirated V12 connected to a manual transmission (without a crappy overdrive sixth gear) in a good aluminum chassis. While it is hardly perfect, the combination creates a sports coupe which is absolutely engaging vehicle to drive. It is raw and challenging at the limit. That's it — pure driving pleasure. The Audi R8 5.2 is also a great driver's car, but the permanent AWD eliminates the fun of hanging out the tail. Most of today's newer sports cars are using turbocharged engines for power (and to keep the EPA happy) and a ton of electronic nannies to improve handling. They are faster, without a doubt, but not as enjoyable from an enthusiast's standpoint. The new Carrera S is a stunning car, but its mission is to make the driver look good despite their skill level. - Mike
          Dan Murphy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Michael Harley
          Thanks Mike. I think I'll hold out for a used V12 Vantage when it's time to let my V8 Vantage go. I've owned an R8 and a 2002 Carrera... I do miss the R8 but there really is something special about an Aston. I too believe the V12 will be the last of it's kind. Cheers, Dan
      Jonathan Arena
      • 3 Years Ago
      Glad to hear the steering felt ok
      jmc
      • 3 Years Ago
      So Michael Harley, having driven both the PDK and the manual, which would you take home and why?
        Michael Harley
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jmc
        Great question! If the 911 was going to be my daily driver, and I was going to track it at a club level for times, I'd go with the PDK. However, if the 911 was going to be a third car in the garage (most likely), I'd grab the 7-speed manual without a doubt. I preferred the manual transmission, even though us humans make shifting a bit slower. I enjoy the interaction with the vehicle — the driver becomes part of the powertrain! - Mike
      4 String
      • 3 Years Ago
      Is that a naturally aspirated flat 6? how did they squeeze so much power out of a 3.8L? whoaa. added on my list of cars to put in my garage in the future o.o
      xcatchmyshadowx
      • 3 Years Ago
      a yellow S with those black headlights + black exhaust tips and black wheels plz, thx!
      Miguro Takahashi
      • 3 Years Ago
      So do the mechanics have to remove the whole back bumper to work on the engine?
        Shoe
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Miguro Takahashi
        I work at a Porsche dealer and on the current models (and Boxster/Cayman) most access is from underneath. There are very few components (other than oil fill and filter and engine air filters) that I have watched the tech touch from the top.
        Evan McMiller
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Miguro Takahashi
        no...
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        Lachmund
        • 3 Years Ago
        better than your thoughts. they don't appeal to anyone!
        Justin Campanale
        • 3 Years Ago
        Poweredbylolz fails again. Please name ONE sub 100k car which is more fun to drive and engaging than this thing.
          Justin Campanale
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Justin Campanale
          Yes, but Lotuses are not at all suited for daily driving. Porsches, on the other hand, even the old ones, can be used daily as daily drivers. I see at least 4-5 Porsches in NH in my daily commute to work every day. I have seen exactly one Lotus that wasn't at a dealership or at a motorsports park/ track.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        MuratY
        • 3 Years Ago
        You could not compare a GTR with a Porsche 911. There was one GTR in Dubai Motor Show today. There was also 991. GTR is a very standard Nissan with cheap plastic interior. Only there were young boys checking the car in the stand. But all the other real drivers were checking 991. If you are poor and want to go faster, there is only one solution. Buy a motorbike.
        FriskyDingo
        • 3 Years Ago
        More refined than a 911?? Haha, you must be snorting that stuff comes from the other first 1/2 of your namesake.....
        IOMTT
        • 3 Years Ago
        Another tool troll.
        mitytitywhitey
        • 3 Years Ago
        I leased a 2009 GT-R. The transmission makes it very jerky around town, putting the 'refined' trophy back in the 911's lap. For around town and 'normal' driving, I'd get a 911 PDK hands-down. For weekend fun it would be a toss-up between a 911 w/ 7-speed manual and the GT-R, with my bias leaning me towards the GT-R due to the ridiculous acceleration.
          Mike B
          • 3 Years Ago
          @mitytitywhitey
          GT-R acceleration is only ridiculous with a standing start, you'll be better of with the 911 w/7speed manual.
        Trevor
        • 3 Years Ago
        You are such a moron, really you are a complete idiot......... Questionable reliability, In 2009 and 2010 porsche had the best reliability of any vehicle beating your precious lexus, and any other japanese brand.
        miketim1
        • 3 Years Ago
        I too tihnk it priced kind of high.. but I dont think a Nissan is better built then a 911. Different cars for different people. The 911 is much more of a drivers car then the GTR. The GTR goes fast with not much emotion.
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