When Porsche launches a new 911, it doesn't just launch one model, it starts a process that will see literally dozens of variants to follow. Some with turbos, some without. Some with all-wheel drive, some driving just the rear. Coupes, convertibles, targas, lightweight models, and yes, even racing versions.

The 911, after all, is one of the most prolific racing cars on circuits around the world. This example, however, is not based on the new 911. What you see here is still based on the old 997. But it is the pinnacle of Porsche Motorsport's range of customer racing cars.

The new GT3 RSR is built to race in the ACO's GTE category, making it instantly eligible for competition in the 24 Hours of Le Mans, the Le Mans Series, the American Le Mans Series and the new FIA World Endurance Championship, as well as the International GT Open and a variety of other series and events.

Its 4.0-liter boxer six drives 460 horsepower (kept in check by a mandatory air restrictor) to the rear wheels via a six-speed sequential gearbox. Porsche has also fitted larger wheels front and rear, and given it a completely new aero package to keep it glued to the tarmac, slicing through the air and at front of the pack.

The best part is that you can buy one yourself. That is, assuming you've got half a million euros (about $675k) to spend on a track toy. Either way, you can check it out in the high-res image gallery and the press release after the jump.
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Porsche 911 GT3 RSR
New customer sport top model for 2012 race season

Stuttgart. The new Porsche 911 GT3 RSR is ready to race. The top model of Porsche Motorsport's customer racing vehicles will head into the 2012 season with extensive modifications. Particularly striking at first glance are the changes to the body: the width of the new GT3 RSR has grown by 48 millimetres. Built to conform to the A.C.O. "LM" GTE regulations, the 911 represents the crowning pinnacle of a range of successful customer sport race cars that are based on the 997 type 911 GT3 RS street sports car.

Powering the new 911 GT3 RSR is a particularly efficient six-cylinder boxer engine with a four-litre capacity. With a mandatory air-restrictor, it generates 460 hp (338 kW) and drives the 310 millimetre wide rear wheels. The diameter of the front wheels has increased by 30 mm to now measure 680 millimetres. The Porsche sequential six-speed gearbox is operated via paddle shifts on the steering wheel.

The nose and rear panels are adapted to the flared front and rear wheel arches, as are the door sill and the wheel arch coverings. The aerodynamic concept is complemented by a new ducting of the intake air. Openings in the rear side sections, as known from the turbo variants of the Porsche 911, replace the air scoop on the engine hood, which is very similar to the 911 GT2 RS street sports car.

The new 911 GT3 RSR can be raced at the Le Mans 24 Hours, the FIA World Endurance Championship, the Le Mans Series, the American Le Mans Series as well as the International GT Open and in other series and races.

"Our customer teams can expect a technically mature, high performance race car with which they will be highly competitive at international long distance races," assures Hartmut Kristen, Head of Porsche Motorsport. "Our test programme on various international race tracks is currently running at full speed. We are very pleased with the car's performance and driveability."

The new Porsche 911 GT3 RSR will be delivered to customer squads around the world from January 2012. The selling price is 498,000 Euro plus value added tax of the respective countries.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 16 Comments
      xcatchmyshadowx
      • 3 Years Ago
      i simply love those yellow headlights!
      Alex Butti
      • 3 Years Ago
      Baddest racecar ever! Nuff said
      lorenzo
      • 3 Years Ago
      finally, I just had an empty feeling inside for so long durring the 997 years. Now I can sleep at night.
      Lachmund
      • 3 Years Ago
      this is one hell of a beast. looks like from another time....AWESOME!
      AcidTonic
      • 3 Years Ago
      460 from a NA 4.0 liter. Impressive. Granted my Evo is making 400hp from 2.0 liters, but it is using a turbo to do so. Props to a well built naturally aspirated motor achieving 115hp per liter. Without the turbo my 2.0 would barely make 120 horsepower. How long until a rebuild I wonder..... Is this a purely a "rebuild-each-race" motor or will it do 100K miles or more?
        Lemon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        This motor is restricted which means it has more potential than 460hp
        Sacitto
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        As been stated, the GT3 RS 500 has a naturally aspirated 500hp motor, that for sale at your Porsche dealership.
        Alex Butti
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AcidTonic
        The RSR motor makes 500hp unrestricted. The GT3 RS 4.0 has the same exact motor unrestricted. So yes, this motor can go to 100k and beyond without rebuilt.
      Dasupersprint
      • 3 Years Ago
      Funny how many 911 road cars are more powerful than the most powerful racing version. Turbo, Turbo S, GT3 RS 4.0, GT2, GT2 RS.
        Georg
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dasupersprint
        none of the road cars run with race regulated air restrictors limiting the poweroutput
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dasupersprint
        It's the same for all GTE class cars. The C6.R GTE has almost the same power as this car, while the ZR-1 and Z06 are way more powerful. Same can be said for the Ferrari 458 GTC.
      benzaholic
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can somebody remind me why the yellow headlights are popular in racing cars? A zillion years ago, I thought it had something to do with the materials available for headlight lenses, and that the most durable for racing were only available with that natural tint, but I'm not sure that was ever correct, and I'm definitely sure it does not apply today.
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @benzaholic
        If you notice, they're only used on the GTE class cars. They're used to differentiate them from the LMPs and the slower GTC class. It's done mostly for safety just so a slower car's driver is well aware that he needs to move over to let him pass.
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