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Battery technology, say the detractors, just isn't there yet. Not enough to make electric vehicles a viable prospect for the majority of drivers at this point. That's what extended-range hybrids are for – to relieve range anxiety and help EVs go that extra mile or two hundred.

That's why the latest figures released by Fisker regarding its Karma luxury hybrid sedan are raising some eyebrows. European regulatory body TUV has independently tested the Karma and found that it can drive 83 kilometers (51.6 miles) on electric-only mode. To put that into perspective, consider that the Toyota Prius PHEV can only go 23 km (14.3 miles) on electric mode without spooling up the gasoline engine for more juice. The Chevrolet Volt, meanwhile, is EPA-rated to go 35 miles on electricity alone.

Fisker must be happy to hear the news after the Environmental Protection Agency rated the Karma at 52 mpge with an electric-only range of 32 miles and 20 mpg after that. The same agency rated the Volt at 95 mpge in the city and between 35 and 40 mpg with the engine running.

But as is the case with every new powertrain that's entered the market this past year, we're less interested in test results than we are in what owners are actually experiencing. Since the Karma is so new, we have a little more waiting to do.
Show full PR text
Fisker Karma Proves 83 km/51.6 Mile Electric Range in TUV Tests

Anaheim, California USA – November 2, 2011:The Fisker Karma has achieved 83 km/51.6 miles running in silence on electric-only mode during independent fuel efficiency tests carried out by Europe's regulatory body, the Technischer Ueberwachungs Verein (TUV) today ("De" according Annex 9 of ECE R 101).

The TUV have carried out the most thorough tests yet of the Karma's real-world urban performance. This is an independent process that measures every element of the Fisker Karma luxury plug-in hybrid's performance.

"We are delighted that the TUV has confirmed that most owners will achieve a 50 mile range running purely on electric during their daily commute," said Fisker Automotive CEO and co-founder Henrik Fisker.

The Karma has already been awarded the highest possible score of 10 out of 10 for fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions on its label from the US Environmental Protection Agency.

ABOUT FISKER AUTOMOTIVE, INC.
Fisker Automotive is an American car company, founded in 2007, committed to producing electric vehicles with extended range (EVer) that deliver uncompromised responsible luxury. The company is designing and developing the world's first line of premium electric plug-in hybrids representing the company's firm belief that environmentally conscious cars need not sacrifice passion, style, or performance. Fisker Automotive is a global company that is redefining luxury for the modern sports car buyer. For more information on the brand and the Fisker Karma Sedan, please go to http://fiskerautomotive.com.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 79 Comments
      Letstakeawalk
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is more consistent with what Fisker themselves have said all along... not really surprising since they are targeting the Euro market very heavily - they probably performed their own tests using a standard similar to the TUV's. Sure, YMMV. But, it will still be the most fuel-efficient luxury sport sedan on the market!
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      This car is probably as good as the volt and have a very good drivability and a luxurious ride quality, it is a 100% electric car. So it have 2 assets, drivability and a green side. Im interrested to see it bought by peoples.
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Better and better, even gorr is positive. Well done old mate!
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        No Gorr, not bought-en by people, so far only Hollywood actors, CEO's, and I believe a king of some such country had a interest in a Karma but no people as of yet. : 0
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          @EVSUPERHERO LOL (a good gorr impression) Fisker has sold out it's entire first production run on deposit paid orders. But those who can afford $100,000 are people too! (richer people but, people).
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      32 miles.. 51.6 miles.. Let me guess, their testing methodology was on the optimistic side? ( no mention on how they came to these numbers ) Just as the Tesla was downrated later on.. so was the Leaf.. and generally everything else electric coming out. This is almost always a rule, isn't it? EV shrinkage is a real problem O_O
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        have a little faith
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Great Dan, you were going for the record for negative ratings and ABG deleted it all. This site is becoming way to PC and PG All because someone called you a tree hugging turd. I saw "Revenge of the Electric Car" All I can say is Fisker, GM, Ford, and other OEM's that delay mass production of EV's will be got with their evil little pants down as the longer they prolong building EV's the stronger the Emperor or little Napoleon at Nissan/Renault becomes. Carlos Ghosn will rule the automotive world and all because every other CEO lacks the courage and conviction to mass produce EV's. Evil pants wearing OEM's, pollution machine lovers, it goes for the impudent, box limited consumers as well. Yes the force is strong in this poster.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Oops, my apologies to ABG wrong article. Turns out you are not deleting comments, sorry for insinuating ABG was turning into Gestapo Germany, so sorry.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Face it Dan, you get shrinkage when it's cold out.
      PR
      • 3 Years Ago
      different test, different results. Not too surprising. The ultimate YMMV !!
      SVX pearlie
      • 3 Years Ago
      If TUV rated the Karma at 50+ miles AER, I wonder what the Ampera will get.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Let's see...what's the cost of that "luxury hybrid sedan" again?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Can any one explain the TUV test standards? What was the average speed? Did the Karma cover the 51.6 miles in one hour; two hours or more? What were the weather conditions? Where the lights, radio and AC on? Was it on flat terrain or actual highways with up and down grades? Oh, and the power used to charge the battery; was that generated by solar, wind, nuclear or coal?
        JakeY
        • 3 Years Ago
        Although it was obscured in the press release ("De" according Annex 9 of ECE R 101), the testing was done under NEDC or the Euro cycle. Details on the NEDC here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_European_Driving_Cycle You can see the Euro cycle here: http://www.epa.gov/nvfel/testing/dynamometer.htm The NEDC cycle in summary: 4 "Elementary Urban Cycle"s for 800secs (13 minutes 20 secs), 18.35kph (11.40mph) average speed, 50kph (31.07mph) peak speed. Followed by 1 "Extra-Urban Driving Cycle" for 400 secs (6 minutes 40 secs), 62.59kph (38.89mph) average speed, 120kph (74.56mph) peak speed. You can see my EPA link for the data and graphs of the speeds vs time in the each cycle. Total testing time is 20 minutes, 33.09kph (20.56mph) average speed, around room temperature (20-30°C), completely flat roads with no wind (typically done on a rolling dyno though), all accessories off (lights, radio, AC, fans, heated rear windows, etc.). Much more lenient than EPA cycle obviously.
      Neil Blanchard
      • 3 Years Ago
      It is not just about the battery. It is mostly about the efficiency of the car. A Cd of 0.36 is, as they say in New Zealand "average" (i.e. pretty bad) and the Karma's weight is ~1300 pounds more than the Tesla S. That car has a Cd of 0.22, and the battery in the Tesla S weighs ~1200 pounds and that base model has a range of 160 miles. If you put a small displacement serial hybrid gen set in the Tesla, with the fuel tank and the cooling system, it couldn't be more than 250 pounds or so? So, it would still weigh less, goes 3X as far all electric, so the platform and especially aerodynamics matter more than the battery. Neil
        Neil Blanchard
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        Oh, and the different range is whether you have the A/C or the heat on, and how you drive, etc. In my Scion xA, I used to average about 375 miles on a tank of gas (10-11 gallons) averaging 37MPG year round. But now I regularly get well above 500 miles and my best was ~618 miles on one tankful (I pumped in ~11.1+) and got 55.2MPG. Only aero mods and ecodriving. http://ecomodder.com/forum/em-fuel-log.php?vehicleid=550 Neil
          Smith Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Neil Blanchard
          Neil, Can you give a link to a picture of your modded xA?
          Neil Blanchard
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Neil Blanchard
          Sure Jim, but it is tape-ugly: http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.102624879762787.5932.100000458268753&type=3 Here's a "public" gallery, which includes my video mirrors: http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v724/NeilBlanchard/Scion%20xA%20AeroMods/ With a belly pan and a full boattail -- and a taller final drive, and this car could get 60-70MPG. Neil
        EVnerdGene
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        Karma .22 Cd Do you have a source for that ?
          Ziv
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          I think he meant the Tesla S will have a .22 Cd. And it might but I think that the occasional blog entries that hinted at the S being around .25 are probably closer. The Karma will be lucky to get to .28, most of the guesses have been around .29.
          Neil Blanchard
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          Someone here on ABG said the Cd of the Karma is 0.36. (My guess was that it was 0.4-0.45, actually.) The Tesla S has a Cd of 0.22 -- this is what Elon Musk says in the recent video. My point is that the Cd matters more than the weight, more so on EV's since their drivetrains are so much more efficient than ICE. Neil
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          The Karma has a Cd of 0.31 according to Top Gear. (Who love the Karma, BTW)
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVnerdGene
          I'd also like to point out that I'm the one who told Neil Blanchard what the quoted Cd of the Fisker Karma is, 0.31 The fact that he couldn't recollect a statement made only a few days earlier... "Where did you see that number? If that is the Cd (with or without the side mirrors?) that is the *same* as my Scion xA. The Cd of any electric car that has a hope of being high efficiency needs to be <.20 is about where the EV1 was. I think that" October 26 2011 at 8:04 AM ...well, I'm just not sure how much I trust someone who is given a bit of info, and who then processes it to the extent of commenting that it is exactly the same as something he knows very well, and then a few days later he can't be sure exactly what the number was? Come on Neil, get with the program! http://green.autoblog.com/2011/10/25/fisker-karmas-5-300-pound-weight-20-mpg/
      JakeY
      • 3 Years Ago
      If it's on a different cycle, of course the results will be different. The Euro and Japanese cycle are consistently more lenient than the US EPA cycle (esp. with the 2008 change). Heck, they can create their own cycle that matches the car perfectly. I couldn't find a TUV specific cycle here, wonder what kind of average speed and conditions they got 51.6 miles of range: http://www.epa.gov/nvfel/testing/dynamometer.htm
        Justin Forposting
        • 3 Years Ago
        @JakeY
        TÜV uses the NEDC cycle. The regs are ECE R101 here: http://www.unece.org/trans/main/welcwp29.html Look for Regulation 101 (as well as R83 for some more finer points)
          JakeY
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Justin Forposting
          So the Euro cycle basically (more applicable when comparing cars in Europe, not the US). Not sure why it had to be obscured in the press release (and somehow Noah missed it in the article). Given the Ampera, rebadged version of the Volt, got 83km (51.6 miles, basically the same as the Karma) on the same cycle, it's not that surprising. The Volt gets 35 miles on the EPA cycle vs 32 miles for the Karma. The 14.3 mile for the Prius Plug-in in the article is also the NEDC cycle.
      PR
      • 3 Years Ago
      What I'm seeing here is that according to the TUV, the Karma will go roughly as far as a Volt in pure electric mode. The EPA rating somewhat confirms that too. In that case, if we want to know how green this car will be compared to Volt's, all we have to do is look at real world Volt data taken directly from the Volt's OnStar reports on http://www.voltstats.net/ Over half the Volt drivers have driven more than 80% of their miles in EV mode, and have actual measured MPG's between 200 MPG and 3000 MPG. Karma owners who drive like that will get similar results, because whenever either of these cars are driven 80%+ on battery power, the actual MPG when the engine is running just doesn't matter that much. So triple digit MPG is "not green" or whatever you want to say? Hardly. Sure, it does suck that it uses more electricity to go the same distance as the Volt. First off, at least it's not using gas (for those who care about such things). And second off, just toss another couple of solar panels on your solar array that you most likely already have if you are a fan enough of green cars and EV's to buy a 90K dollar green car. A few solar panels are a rounding error on the price of this car, and will make up for that difference in electricity use.
        Smith Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PR
        Obviously any person who can afford this car can afford the additional solar modules. It will take 80% more solar modules to power the Karma compared to a Volt or Leaf. I have not done the math but I'd wager it will take more than "another couple of solar panels" to power the Karma. Many people make the mistake of overestimating how much energy you can get from solar PV. Saying the Karma can be green if enough solar PV is added to a home is like building a home with insufficient insulation and then making up for it by installing more solar modules. It takes a significant amount of energy, materials and manpower to manufacture solar modules.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          @Jim, Gosh, poor old Fisker just can't win! But then again, although it may well " take a significant amount of energy, materials and manpower to manufacture solar modules.", this is very good for the economy in terms of employment and commerce, and unit cost savings on solar modules. So maybe that should be added as a plus to the Fisker-Karma for reducing unemployment and reducing the cost of solar power. Hmmmm...lets see,... many of these affluent owners will install oversized systems and contribute more 'green' energy back to the grid so...... There, y' go Jim, some more calculations to keep you occupied....:)
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PR
        @PR I sorry, PR that post is just too logical and sensible! You are a bad influence! Even Gorr is begining to improve......
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      A great looking car, well made and finally available for purchase. I very much doubt whether any Fisker potential owners care about the anorak minutia of obscure ratings that have no affect on the desirability of the Fisker. I have a mental picture of good old Neil Blanchard outside a Fisker showroom, earnestly regaling a prospective Fisker buyer with anorak details. The Fisker buyer, nodding distractedly as his eyes are mesmerised by the shinning machine within. When Neil finally draws breath, the buyer suddenly, becomes aware of the bearded, anorak figure beside him, searches guiltily for some spare change which he passes to Neil, and strides briskly into the Fisker showroom, platinum credit card in hand to make his purchase. Outside, the wind blows cold, and Neil goes off in search of a mutton bird to take home for supper. (he did his best) The new Fisker owner can't decide what to do first, should he SMS (Video) all his friends, up date his Facebook/Linked-in site, or cruise by that really exclusive, elegant club he's been too afraid of rejection to try until now. The long silver hood sparkles, the electrons purr, he feels a winner! No rejection tonight, baby..... (he just has to keep up the payments)
        briang19
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Actually, I am one of those people who ordered a Karma, and I cared a lot about the "minutia of obscure ratings." I was on the verge of canceling my order when the EPA numbers came out, but these new European numbers (combined with some other data I've received) has renewed my faith that the car gets what Fisker has been claiming. It's still not the best EV out there, but it's the only EV I would actually want to get in and drive every day. It's a hell of a lot more green than my SUV that I drive around every day right now.
          Spiffster
          • 3 Years Ago
          @briang19
          The Volt only got 51.6 on this obviously lenient testing cycle? WTF...
          theflew
          • 3 Years Ago
          @briang19
          You have faith in the same TUV testing numbers that said the Volt will get 51.6 miles in electric and the Leaf 109? Good luck with that.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @briang19
          Briang 19 That's interesting, thanks for sharing that. But what don't you like about the Tesla S ? The Fisker may be a pretty cramped car after an SUV.
        Rotation
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Yeah, energy consumption is minutia. What's more important is that you can pretend you're doing something to help. And look good doing it.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          Tax man won't be taking anything away as he is a investment banker and he needs the write off, he will write off his club expense as well, at the club he will ponder if he like the Karma better or the Ferrari that is two years old sitting in his garage since 2008 and only has 6000 miles on it. That story was damn funny because, like Hommer Simpson would say, "it was not directed at me".
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          @Rotation (singing) He'll have fun, fun, fun, 'til the taxman takes the Fisker away..........
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          @EVSUPERHERO Heh,heh, so young and yet so wise!
          throwback
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Rotation
          MP that was funny! I agree most people buying this car will not care wether they get 50 miles or 5.
        Spiffster
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Amusing. Interesting choice of words too, as usual. Must be an English thing...
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        yeah the people buying green cars don't care about how efficient they are. makes sense.. if you have a sickness of the mind
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          @DF, Late at night, a small troll whines, few listen, even fewer care.
        Nick
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        Fun story, but the way you generalise things and label people is amazing. Do you really think EVERYONE who buys the Fisker: 1) Does not care about the environment at all. 2) Does not care about the EV range. 3) ONLY buys it to look good and pick up girls at fancy clubs (as if a nice car made a difference).
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Nick
          If you can drive your car into a bar it would. Range was never the issue above. I agree, Neil could be a very eccentric millionair.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Nick
          @Nick Oh dear Nick, No of course I don't ! But, thanks for appreciating the humour! I was really responding to all the bitter comments levelled at the Fisker Karma, predicting doom, lack of sales etc. I hoped a lighthearted approach may show that a lot of buyers will be attracted to the Karma because of its stylish appearance. Very much in the same way Coca Cola ads, show pictures of young, good looking people, enjoying a wonderful lifestyle with Coca Cola. It's an illusion. Hopefully the Fisker Karma will indeed, attract young, affluent, image conscious males (and females) away from their SUV's and Porsches etc. This sort of buyer is not attracted to worthy practical vehicles like iMev, Th!nk, Leaf' s a hatch, GM Volt's middle executive, Tesla's S, won't appeal because it's a saloon car. But, these highly affluent, highly mobile younger buyers are some of the biggest wasters of fossil fuel. Sure, lot's of different people will buy a Fisker. Older wealthier people seeking an environmentally friendly form of transport with style and amazing technology. All sort of buyers. Hopefully, the Karma might attract some of the image conscious, fashion trend-setters, thereby creating a more prestigious image for EV's in general. It might even promote environmental consciousness. Oh, and Nick, sad as it maybe, down at the shallow end of town, where the all important club, 'A' list reigns supreme, it really is important! Ownership of a Fisker Karma might just get you past the Security, and into the clubs VIP section, inhabited by a certain type of girl who notices the trappings of success! (and you don't even have to posses the other sort of Coke!). You may still look like an escapee from the "Big Bang Theory' TV show, but the Doorbitch, will assume your are a Silicon Valley Zillionaire! Marketing, is all about generalising. (At least when it comes to effective publicity) A $100,000+ car needs to sell to a specific target audience. The Fisker Karma is not a breakthrough Tesla roadster, It's aimed at a specific market. Will all Karmas be sold to a predetermined market demographic? No, but the majority will. The Karma is not aimed at those grimly fuel conscious, spartan, whole earth types, knitting their own yogurt and living Vegan lifestyles! It's an extravagance! It's fun! It's, it's .... well, just a great piece of art/engineering/ technology, in a sexy suit! Enjoy!
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      Considering 90% of all your trips are below 30 miles, I don't get what all the loud whining is about. You can use this car as an EV and hardly ever turn on the ice. I'd take this over an A8 / S-Class / 7-series any day.
        electronx16
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        Sure, but in EV mode it uses about 650 WH/mile where the Volt for instance only uses about 340WH/Mile so apart from being a gas hog the Karma is also an electricity hog. Electricity doesn't grow on trees you know...
          JakeY
          • 3 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          @EVSUPERHERO Actually, that's not the reason. The reason is the Fisker weighs 5300lbs (which increases rolling resistance and the amount of power you need to accelerate) and has mediocre aerodynamics. There's probably some extra inefficiencies in the drivetrain too. The EPA cycle doesn't take into account that you have more peak power available (and can accelerate faster). The amount of acceleration is already predetermined in the cycle (you have to be at a certain speed at a certain time), so having more power available doesn't really change anything (the only reason why most cars with more power do worse is for an ICE, more power usually means more displacement, which means lower efficiency). Just look at the rating for the Roadster (0-60 in 3.9, 3.7 for the Sport); the available fast acceleration didn't have any impact on its rating (it should have gotten a much worse rating if acceleration was factored in). It might have even helped it because the way Tesla got more powerful motors was by increasing efficiency so more amps can be pumped through without overheating it.
          Ele Truk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          Well, it does if you have a wood burning steam powered electric generator.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          Yea, but the Volt won't do 0-60 in 6 seconds. Speed kills... Speed and acceleration always kills efficiency, the laws of physics can't be avoided, even in a EV. Though I have heard opinions expressed that larger EV motors actually are more efficient for some reasons. Of course not if they are used to accelerate quickly or driven at high speeds, once again physics.
          otiswild
          • 3 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          I get more like 410WH/mi in my Volt, but I do leave it in sport mode all the time, plus Texas summers.. Either way I can do a round-trip commute and charge for $0.007/mile at the parking garage's L2 charger..
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @electronx16
          ... or if you make ethanol from wood chips, and then use that ethanol in a fuel cell...
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        I am very critical of the Karma but I still agree with that.
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