• Nov 2nd 2011 at 6:01PM
  • 16
At the moment, the Northeast is not exactly a hotbed for electric vehicle use in the United States. With chilly winters making consumers nervous about battery range and dealers in some states still not even offering vehicles like the Nissan Leaf, the Northeast currently claims only about 6% of the U.S. EV fleet.

However, that number could get a boost as a new charging network offers additional stations across an 11-state area. The Northeast Electric Vehicle Network has announced plans for hundreds of new public charging stations from Maine to D. C. By working together, participants hope to build an infrastructure that convinces the area's many green and high tech consumers to go electric.

The network is a cooperative agreement among agencies in the participating states. The list of states involved includes Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington, DC. Bolstering the effort will be a $994,500 grant from the Department of Energy, which will be used to set up guidelines for permitting and siting the charging stations.


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  • 16 Comments
      Michael
      • 3 Years Ago
      Finally, the Northeast has been a second mover on new energy tech and emissions standards for at least the last 10 years. I would like to thank those in California for moving the ball forward (as much as I hate to give them any credit). There are plenty of potential buyers in this area of the country, but without a sufficient infrastructure we were left in the cold so to speak.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      Northern California needs some build out. I see lots of new EVs but not much on the infrastructure front. Not that it is sorely needed since most people charge up at home for nearly everything . . . but it would be nice. With all these projects, this area deserves chargers because we've bought a ton of EVs around here. I see them literally every day.
        throwback
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        " this area deserves chargers because we've bought a ton of EVs around here. " I think the reverse is true. Clearly your area does not need chargers to help EVs sell, so why install them? You (private owners) could install some cooperative chargers for use on a subscription basis.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @throwback
          Well the very early adopters don't mind . . . but it may be hard to keep the momentum going if the very few chargers around are constantly in use. Right now though, the issue seems to be going from the old incompatible types of chargers to the new J17772 chargers
      • 3 Years Ago
      I want to see charging stations along the New York State Thruway!!
      • 3 Years Ago
      How about a CHADeMO station in Tyson's Corner, Virginia and maybe Silver Spring, MD and Alexandria VA so that at regular intervals along the Capital Beltway folks can get a quick charge?
      DarylMc
      • 3 Years Ago
      The first thing that comes to my mind when looking at the picture is that given the cost of getting these things installed and the size of that cable, is that they should have the best cable retracting system that money can buy. I agree with Peter, and think most people will charge at home and work unless there were cords attached to every parking meter. But I also think an investment of $1M is probably reasonable and doubt it's going to pay for a whole lot of stations. Even less I suppose, if they have super dooper retracting systems.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DarylMc
        I'm something of a fan of induction charging. It gets rid of most of the street furniture. Renault and others are developing it. The criticism is that it lowers efficiency. In fact losses in the cable etc in plug in charging can approach the same level. If it can be done at reasonable cost, what's not to like?
          DarylMc
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          I don't think the losses in a cable will be anything like the losses in an induction system but sure I know which one I would find more convenient in my garage. Baby steps I suppose. I've already got a garage!
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          The losses are annoying but not huge. I think the big problem is that you are taking a technology that is already struggling with high costs and adding on yet another cost. The biggest issue with EVs is cost! That is why the Ford Focus electric announcement is such a disappointment . . . it costs more than the Leaf but has a (slightly) smaller battery. If EVs remain just a toy for the rich with Teslas and Fiskers, there will be a huge political backlash against them as a wasteful government money sink to create ecological friendly toys for the rich. If that is the best we can do, then it is a waste of money. But I know we can do better. The 2011 Leaf shows it can be done. The Mitsubishi-i shows it can be done. Even the Volt (which is a bit pricey) shows it can be done.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @DaveMart
          Counter-intuitively, apparently not: '‘There has been a lot of mythology around wireless charging being inefficient. Although we lose a couple of per cent from the road to the car, most high-frequency plug-in chargers have a similar loss through AC-DC conversion and back again,’ added Thomson. HaloIPT has been conducting independent tests with the Sustainable Vehicle Engineering Centre at Oxford Brookes University that directly compare inductive versus plug-in technologies. Early data apparently show they are more or less equal in terms of charge efficiency, with inductive possibly showing a marginal benefit. ' http://www.theengineer.co.uk/sectors/automotive/tfl-depots-to-trial-inductive-charging-technology/1007568.article This assessment is not an outlier. At worst the efficiency losses seem tolerable, if they exist at all. The challenge is the cost.
      Peter
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nissan has just "proved" that no one dares go more than 37 miles with a Leaf. Let us only hope that the money is spent on highway corridors for DC fast charging, but even a million bucks will not get you "hundreds" of fast "chargers" so sigh, its not going to happen. PLEASE If it has to be slow chargers give grants to let employers put (split) plugs out for their employees. (at 110 V a Leaf will get 40 miles topup in an 8 h shift). Much more bang for the buck, much less waste, and can be up converted to 15A 220V (3KW) with the wiring in place.
      • 3 Years Ago
      I want to see a chargeing station in Lewistown Pa. ( Central Pa.)
      • 3 Years Ago
      Where are the Betterplace charging stations? They have the best design in my view. Also! When will the Leaf have a switchable battery to take advantage of the Betterplace switch Station to :Drive-Switch-and Go in the USA?
      • 3 Years Ago
      Who do I contact to get more information about this effort? I am a member of the Central Connecticut State University President's Advisory Council for Environmental Sustainability and we are exploring ways to install some EV charging stations on the CCSU campus. Please email me if you have contact information for this program at buttonche@ccsu.edu Thanks, (Dr. Charles E. Button)
      • 3 Years Ago
      I want to see a charging station in Lewistown Pa.( central Pa.)
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