If you're old enough to remember the gas shortages of the 1970s, then you probably remember the long lines to get fuel. If you aren't old enough and you'd like to experience those lines for yourself, head to New England. A massive October snowfall has left many without power, including gas stations. That means that those gas stations that still have power are getting swamped, and tanker trucks aren't getting through because of the weather. Add it all up, and you have the makings of a small crisis.

WTNH talked to Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy, who surveyed the devastation via helicopter. Malloy is asking residents not to top off their tanks, adding that if you have three-quarters of a tank "we're going to get through this." The mayor insists that there is enough gas to go around and that deliveries are being made.

Hit the jump to watch video of the WTNH report. There is also post-jump video from the JB Allen Report that shows that at least some gas stations have, in fact, run out of gas over the last couple of days. Has the situation improved? What say you, New England Autoblog readers? Let us know in Comments.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 19 Comments
      jbm0866
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just another example of how fragile our modern infrastructure and way of life is..
        Dvanos
        • 3 Years Ago
        @jbm0866
        No kidding, just like George Carlin said on one of his stand ups. It's scarey.
      rllama
      • 3 Years Ago
      yeah yeah - preparing for winter, right folks? Preparing for a 5 day power failure in a place that's never had a 24 hour power failure in the last 12 years? So yeah, long lines and gas shortages are caused when A) 90% of the gas stations didn't have power for the first 2 days, B) people have been running their houses on gas generators and C) people without gas generators have moved into their cars and just sit in there driveway with the engine idling, either because it's too cold to sleep in the house, or just because they need to charge up their phones. So, less supply, more demand ... shortage.
      Hazdaz
      • 3 Years Ago
      So who was that moron that was claiming that power outages is one more reason not to buy an EV?? This is a perfect example of why even gas-powered cars are susceptible when the power goes out. When there is no power, sure, you can't recharge an EV, but you also can't pump gas into your car as well.
        Car Guy
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        I can store a couple of extra cans of gas in may garage. Extra electrons....not so much......
          Sean Conrad
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Car Guy
          You mean like a generator, or solar panels?
          S.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Car Guy
          Re: Sean Conrad Doesn't that defeat the purpose? Using a gas-powered generator to charge your electric car? And solar panels covered by 2 feet of snow seem pretty useless to me.
        mikemaj82
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        well it's really the idiots who waited until it was too late to get gas. didn't your mother ever tell you to fill up when a snow storm is predicted? ;)
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Hazdaz
        [blocked]
      Lowland
      • 3 Years Ago
      Damn. Here in Flanders it's still sunny and lukewarm outside... Even at night it's still a little above freezing.
      MJC
      • 3 Years Ago
      I live in CT, and the situation has hardly improved since Saturday. However most people can get out of their streets now, and if you drive 30 miles south of Hartford (or north), there is plenty of gas. The "shortage" is isolated to central/northern CT, and is not due to a lack of fuel, but to the fact that many stations have no power to run the pumps.
        Slizzo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MJC
        I'm with ya MJC. Issue with this storm wasn't that it was snow, it's that it was heavy wet snow that fell much earlier than usual. All the leaves were still on the trees thus the trees captured most of the snow. That means a lot of down trees/limbs. Power is still out at my house in Newington, most of the gas stations on the Pike are open. My main issues are these: CL&P is utter sh*t, and why the hell did it take the state 4 days to clear all the blocked lanes on Rte 15/5?! It's a major artery, and the road is dangerous enough with open lanes! But between most of the lights being out, and then having trees/limbs blocking whole lanes? Ridiculous.
      lemonite
      • 3 Years Ago
      Crazy people. Here in MA power is promised to be back in most places today/tomorrow.
      plarson79
      • 3 Years Ago
      I live in CT and have no power. The temp drops to 20 degrees at night and we have no heat. It stinks! Power is not expected to be restored for at least another week.
      Kimura
      • 3 Years Ago
      I drove through the storm Saturday night because I wanted to go to Leominster. Took about an hour on Rt. 2 vs the normal 30 minutes but no big deal, it was fun. Just take your time and drive smartly. Meanwhile I had the snow equipment tuned up and ready to go in September and gassed up well before hand. It's all about planning ahead. We knocked the snow off the tree over the course of the night every hour or so and only lost one already dead branch. Lots of trees down in the area though. I'm surprised we didn't loose power.
      mrbrian2334
      • 3 Years Ago
      Where I am in CT lucked out; no loss of power and hardly any snow. Co-workers living two towns over and some friends living upstate won't have power 'til Monday, CL&P says.
      sp33dklz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Crybabies. A little forethought when you live in an area that normally gets a lot of snow would go a long way.
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