The FIA is serious about developing environmentally friendly forms of motorsport. But while its premier series – Formula One – is implementing new measures like regenerative braking and heat-energy recuperation, F1 remains a fossil fuel-powered sport. That's where Formula E comes in.

First mooted back in April and officially announced in August, the FIA Formula E series starts from scratch with a new formula that calls for entirely electric propulsion. The FIA has put out an official tender for interested constructors to submit their proposals, and after Italian upstart FondTech pitched their idea in September, now Kleenspeed is getting in on the action.

The American outfit already produces an array of electric vehicles, from scooters and karts to electric-converted Miatas and even the EV-X11 sports prototype. Its Formula E concept is certainly no less ambitious, outlining plans for Kleenspeed to develop and manufacture the energy storage and propulsion systems, the complete chassis and everything that goes in it. Kleenspeed even wants to field the car with its own works team.

Whether the Formula E championship ends up going with a single design (like IndyCar, GP2, Formula 2, A1GP, Superleague and just about every other open-wheel single-seater racing series), a constructor-team format (like Formula 1) where every team designs and builds its own cars, or something in between likely depends on the quantity and quality of the proposals. But we can already see Kleenspeed's design whizzing around the world's finest racing circuits. Details in the press release after the jump.
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KLEENSPEED Files Expression of interest Proposal with FIA for Formula E Championship

The FIA (Federation Internationale De L'Automobile), the sanctioning body for Formula 1 racing and other world-class racing series, issued a call for Expressions of Interest in a new series being developed to feature electric racing cars in a formula based concept.

KLEENSPEED Technologies developed a comprehensive proposal for the FIA and has submitted our Expression of Interest Proposal to become a part of this new EV competition arena.

Our potential involvement in the FIA FE series will depend on a number of significant factors, but we are hopeful that there will be interest in our advanced EV technologies and that the necessary relationships will develop to allow us to become an active participant in FIA FE.

Formula E Championship
The FIA is now in the concept and formulation stage regarding an electric vehicle formula series and called for interested parties to submit formal proposals regarding their planned involvement by 10.14.2011. The FIA call was quite broad and it is anticipated that many manufacturers, large racing promoters and factory teams have submitted plans of various scope. It is not settled at this point whether the FE series will be based on a Spec formula or encourage individual chassis and/or powertrain designs. The actual format of the races/competitions is also open.

KLEENSPEED offered our perspectives on the formula specification and the core concepts of a successful and engaging E-Racing Formula.

"The public is smart and demanding of fresh, relevant experiences, aligned with the values of a sustainable future. New technology is fascinating and the performance of electric race cars is electrifying. Speed, sound, passing and pit stops are the traditional interest points of motorsport which will continue. In addition, the performance characteristic of the electric race car with it's instantaneous torque and burst of speed out of a corner will capture the next generation of motorsports enthusiasts." Timothy Collins, KleenSpeed President

"All traditional ICE motorsports, including Formula 1, are now at the top of the Technological S Curve. EV racing will be the rebirth of motorsports." Dante Zeviar, KleenSpeed CTO

KLEENSPEED Technologies proposed our potential involvement and partnerships in these primary areas:
* Research & Development of the Energy Storage System (ESS) for FE
* Research & Development of the complete Electric Propulsion System (EPS) for an FE Racecar
* Development & Fabrication of a complete FE Racecar
* Entry as a Racing Team Participant in the FIA Formula E Championship
* Technical Partnerships with Other Parties to Develop ESS and EPS for FE Racecars
* Design & Engineering of EV Systems and Components for FE Racecars
* Manufacturing of EV Systems and Components for FE Racecars

KLEENSPEED also proposed our potential involvement in these secondary areas :
* Sponsorship, Partnership, Investment & Support Solicitation
* FE Championship Event Concept & Context Development
* Research & Development of Advanced and Innovative Technologies
* KS Telemetrics™ Social Media Telemetry & Audience Engagement Media Technologies
* KS AccoustoSonics™ R&D to Develop a Unique Sound Signature for Formula E Racecars
* Event Planning & Development In Northern California Racing Venues

We invite you to contact us soon for more information, to arrange interviews with the principals and to learn more about the company and our innovative technologies.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      battery swap
        Dave D
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        No battery swap. We need to learn to improve the breed (batteries). That will bleed over into every day car use more quickly and that is the true benefit of racing to me. It truly can drive innovation that improves all cars. Ok, I admit I love to see them flying around the track but they really can drive improvements in tech too :-)
          Dave D
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          SJ, It would be easy to have a 20-25 minute sprint cup series with today's technology. And they could aim to increase distance by 10% each year. There are plenty of sprint races that are popular. Even the great F1 has GP2 which consists of one long race and one short sprint race as a sort of "undercard" the day before the Grand Prix on some weeks. And there are very popular sprint car series that go about 20-25 minutes in Europe, especially the UK.
          Smith Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          Battery swap is the only way EV racing would make sense with the exception of drag racing. Energy density would have to improve by at least 10X in order to have a race that would last long enough to justify spectators spending money to watch the race.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          Dave, when I say battery swap is the way it is not an invitation to disagree : ) having the cars grind to a halt after 10 minutes of driving is not a way to improve batteries. obviously. and since it costs time to go to pit that is plenty motivation to improve batteries. always assume I am right.
          Dave D
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          Dan, Don't pull for the battery swappers, it just encourages them. LOL Seriously, I would rather settle for sprint races and build up which forces battery tech to improve more quickly. In the real world, only fleet vehicles really make sense for battery swapping and they don't need racing to improve anything. I tried to keep an open mind...but I kept getting images of "blowing goats" ROFLMAO...where did you get that one??? I haven't laughed so hard in months. As a good old southern redneck, I thought I'd heard all the good sayings, but you got me with that one. LOL
        xxxZOMBIExxx
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Why? F1 is no longer allowed to make fuel stops...Tires only. It will force teams to focus on efficiency as well as speed. It will also force advancement in capacity.
          xxxZOMBIExxx
          • 3 Years Ago
          @xxxZOMBIExxx
          They can go much longer that ten minutes. An F1 style chassis weighs around 1500 lbs with the driver. A Formula E chassis with battery and driver would likely be only 1700-1800 lbs. This should give it a minimum 30 minutes of operation.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @xxxZOMBIExxx
          because the race will end after 10 minutes otherwise. there will be plenty of focus on improving efficiency to minimize number of pitstops.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @xxxZOMBIExxx
          zombie, the raceabout electric car that lapped the nurburgring spent 24kWh on a single lap. it could not complete a second lap. the toyota radical record car had a 41.5kWh pack. no doubt it was not able to do a second lap either. that was less than 8 minutes and nowhere near F1 power
      Timo
      • 3 Years Ago
      F1 car drivetrain weights around 350-400kg with fuel for one full race in the car about 150-200kg without, entire car _with driver_ 640kg. If we assume 60kg driver (those F1 drivers are usually small) That leaves 580 - 200 = 380 kg for rest of the car. (640+~200L of fuel = ~840kg) That's base for what this should be. Add in 500kg of batteries with cooling, 75kg engine + PEM + transmission, have 955kg car, 1015kg with driver. That's just 175kg more than F1 car. Assume that 500kg is enough for 150kWh (battery price should not be an issue), engine able to produce 600kW (F1 engine is around 600kW), you have a car that has approx 3 secs to 60mph, 6 to 120mph, top speed around 250mph, cornering ability close to F1 with full fuel load and with KERS proper to EV able to race around 20 minutes. With slow race circuits like Monaco considerably longer. Sprint races, but should be fun to watch. Of course halving the power output you would still have very fast cars that last twice as long, 40 minutes.
        Dave D
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Timo
        Timo, You sure the 640kg includes the fuel? I keep trying to find clarification on that but haven't come across it so far.
          Timo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave D
          You got me wrong. 640 kg is minimum weight with a driver. With fuel for one full race onboard that is around 840kg. There is a comma missing after "with fuel for one full race in the car".
        xxxZOMBIExxx
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Timo
        You forgot to subtract the weight of the ICE from the 640kg...
          Timo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @xxxZOMBIExxx
          No I didn't. F1 engine weights only 95kg, and that includes entire engine with cooling, fluids, and exhausts.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Timo
        it shouldn't carry 500kg batteries. and 150kWh would be 300Wh/kg including structure and cooling. that's one hell of a battery you got there. battery swap
          Timo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan Frederiksen
          Those do exist, and price is not a problem, or at least should not be a problem.
      Dave D
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'd love to see the specs on this. They were very open about their plans on the FondTech entry and I'd like to see the same details here. Maybe Dan scared them off? LOL
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dave D
        with a design like that they should be scared. they should be mortified : ) but they can dust themselves off and try again. I suggest 4x40kg swappable blocks in the side pods and a design along the lines of the redbull X1 from GT4. variable geometry to not waste energy on air on the straights.
      Neil Blanchard
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope they take full advantage of the reduced cooling air flow and no intake or exhaust flows in the aerodynamic package. The side pods can be quite different since they won't have need for (large?) intakes, and the exhaust flow doesn't need to be dealt with, either. Neil
        xxxZOMBIExxx
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        Some of the intakes that you would see in an F1 car will still be needed. Those intakes are multi-purpose, as most the electronic control modules are mounted in the side intakes for cooling. Battery cooling will also be needed and the intakes will be utilized for that function as well. I think that we will find that this chassis looks remarkably similar to current Formula series chassis.
      Timo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just for those not familiar with the F1 racing, many of the regulations made by FIA are actually made to artificially slow those cars down (mainly for safety reasons). If we would let the smart guys in the engineering departments a free reign in the cars with several million dollar budget they could quite easily build a EV with similar outlook and weight as F1 car that is actually a lot faster around the track. I suspect that beginner FE teams do not get such engineering geniuses as best of the F1 teams have, but they could still make those cars really really fast.
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