The 2012 Ford Focus Electric showed up on the company website's configurator this morning with a base price of $39,200 before state and federal incentives, plus an additional $795 for destination charges. That brings the total base starting price of the Focus Electric to $39,995. Factor in a maximum federal tax credit of $7,500 and the price falls to a more palatable $32,495.

For comparison's sake, the 2012 Nissan Leaf features a base starting price of $35,200 plus $850 for destination charges. Factoring in delivery fees, Ford's EV will cost $3,945 more than Nissan's before incentives.

Options that will inch up the Focus Electric's price are few, but include special Blue Candy ($395) and White Platinum ($495) paint options, as well as leather-trimmed seats ($995) to replace the car's standard Earth-friendly cloth seats.

What you'll get for your money is Ford's fun-to-drive Focus with a permanent-magnet electric motor producing 123 horsepower and 181 pound-feet of torque. The motor is fed by a 23 kwh lithium-ion battery system and mated to a single-speed transmission. A full charge can be had in 18-20 hours by a typical 120v outlet or 3-4 hours by a special 240v charger. While no quick charge option is available, Ford has partnered with a company called SunPower to offer a home solar charging option for an additional $10,000.

You can reserve your own 2012 Ford Focus Electric by clicking here.

UPDATE: Official Ford press release added.
Show full PR text
Ford Opens Reservations for 2012 Focus Electric

2012 Focus electric is Ford's first all-electric, 100% gas-free, passenger car and the first of five planned electrified vehicles

Detailed product specifications and virtually build and price available at online website: http://www.ford.com/electric/focuselectric/2012/

Ford Certified EV dealers in California and New York/New Jersey markets will begin taking first orders for the 2012 Focus Electric


SEATTLE, WA., Nov. 2, 2011 – Starting today, drivers that want to go completely gasoline-free will be able to configure the all-new 2012 Ford Focus Electric online at Ford.com and place their orders with a Certified Electric Vehicle (EV) dealer.

"Today is an historic day, as Ford opens up the order banks for the company's first full production, all-electric passenger vehicle – the Focus Electric," said Chad D'Arcy, Focus Electric Marketing Manager, Ford Motor Company. "The all-new Focus Electric is an important part of Ford's overall strategy, bringing still another option to customers who want a car that is fun-to-drive, easy to own and fully electric."

Drivers interested in learning more about the 2012 Focus Electric will be able to see detailed product specs and virtually build and price one at a dedicated online website: http://www.ford.com/electric/focuselectric/2012/ starting Wednesday.

Focus Electric comes standard with: MyFord Touch with 8-inch touchscreen; two driver-configurable 4.2-inch color LCD displays in cluster for unique EV driving screens; MyFord™ Mobile App (for remotely monitoring and scheduling battery charging with owners' smartphone as well as remote start); HID Headlamps; 17-inch aluminum wheels, ambient lighting, seats made from 100-percent recycled material; Rear Camera with Rear Parking Sensor; Intelligent Access with Push-Button Start; MyKey®; voice-activated Navigation System; Particulate Air Filter; hands-free SYNC® Bluetooth telephone connectivity with Traffic, Direction and Information Services; electronic traction control; Sony®-Branded audio with nine speakers; SIRIUS® Satellite Radio and HD Radio™.

The only options on well-equipped Focus Electrics are leather seats and two paint colors.

"Ford believes driving electric doesn't mean consumers should have to sacrifice on driving experience or vehicle quality," said D'Arcy. "The Focus Electric comes with more standard features than any other comparable all-electric vehicle."

In addition to silently cruising past gas stations, Focus Electric drivers will never need oil changes or any of the other service required on gasoline engines. Focus Electric exclusively stores energy in an advanced lithium-ion battery pack. The battery pack uses liquid-cooling to help ensure a long-life and optimal performance under all weather and driving conditions.

The Focus Electric's battery can be recharged in just over three hours using a 240-volt charging station, about half the charging time of the 2012 Nissan Leaf. Drivers also can top off the battery any standard 120-volt outlet using the included charging cord.

The online site also provides potential customers the ability to find the location of their nearest Ford Certified EV dealer so they can place their order.

A limited number of Focus Electrics will first be available in California and the New York/New Jersey regions. Availability of the Focus Electric will expand next year to the remaining 15 launch markets as production ramps up.

The 19 launch markets include: Atlanta, Austin and Houston, Texas; Boston, Chicago, Denver, Detroit, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, New York, Orlando, Fla., Phoenix and Tucson, Ariz.; Portland, Ore.; Raleigh Durham, N.C.; Richmond, Va., Seattle, and Washington, D.C.

Markets were chosen based on several criteria, including commuting patterns, existing hybrid purchase trends, utility company collaboration and local government commitment to electrification.

Power of choice
Electrification is an important piece of Ford's overall product sustainability strategy, which includes the launch of five electrified vehicles in North America by 2012 and in Europe by 2013. Ford launched the Transit Connect Electric small commercial van in 2010 and will launch the all-new Focus Electric later this year. In 2012, these models will be joined in North America by the new C-MAX Hybrid, a second next-generation lithium-ion battery hybrid and C-MAX Energi plug-in hybrid. This diverse range of electrified vehicles allows Ford to meet a variety of consumer driving needs.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 263 Comments
      Marco Polo
      • 7 Months Ago
      Sir Vix, I'm not so sure. To people buying a car costing more than $40,000, "image" becomes increasingly important. Especially in the executive fleet market. The executive Fleet market is where GM's Volt's is designed to succeed. With cars in the $20,000 -30,000 sector, fuel economy is far more important. But the higher the price, the less fuel is a factor, and style, image etc become more powerful motivators. These vehicles reflect the lifestyles and aspirations of the owner, more than a desire to save on fuel.
      masteraq
      • 3 Years Ago
      This would have been a hit if it were priced competitively with the Leaf and (post tax credit) Prius. It's as green and cheap as the Japanese cars, but more fun to drive! Alas, this price is not competitive.
      fairfireman21
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am sorry but $40,000, and the long charge time without the $10,000 charger makes it all not worth it.
      Noz
      • 3 Years Ago
      These car companies don't get it....people want simple, reliable, transportation...not crap that is loaded with stupid electronics, electrically powered everything, and such. Give us a simple, decent driving EV with basic stuff and it'll be going for $25K...and it'll be lighter to boot.
        Chris M
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Noz
        "Less expensive" does not necessarily equal "lighter". There is only so much weight savings possible by cutting out parts, beyond that weight savings means using exotic and expensive materials like high strength steel, aluminum, and carbon fiber composites.
        Marco Polo
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Noz
        @Noz The Ford Focus EV is based on the Ford Focus. Experience has taught automakers that it's very difficult to make money on basic cars. Not only are such vehicles unpopular as new cars, but as used vehicles they are a disaster. Small manual cars may sell to a small percentage of male drivers, but on the used market Autos fetch a premium with female buyers. Why is this important? It affects insurance and finance values. Very important with economy car buyers. A 'simple driving basic EV, for $25 K , is not possible to produce, and if it was wouldn't sell profitably in any real volume. Fitting a lot of extras, doesn't raise the price much, but makes the higher price for EV construction more palatable. Automakers are in business to make a profit, not fulfil an ideology criteria.
          Spec
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          "A 'simple driving basic EV, for $25 K , is not possible to produce, and if it was wouldn't sell profitably in any real volume." The Mitsubishi-i is $22K (after tax-credit). However, it is a very low-end vehicle. I'd like to see one that is a little bit better and costs $25K after tax-credit. Ford made a decision to half-ass the FFE and I believe that will be viewed as a bad decision in retrospect. Due to the outsourcing and small volume, they won't get the manufacturing scale and efficiencies needed to make a good relatively-inexpensive EV. Go big or go home. Nissan and GM went big. Ford just went through the motions to show they have an electric.
          Jim McL
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          "Go big or go home"? Tesla kick started this generation according to many with a very low volume. Their next model will still be lower volume than the Focus. Think started the first generation of EVs in the early 1990s (before GMs EV1) with a low price and good crash performance, with Ford eventually buying (then selling) Think. Even small players have made big waves.
          Noz
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @POLO: Making stupid comments like that is well..just plain stupid. The Leaf is already $7000 cheaper than the Focus. So cheaper products already exist...we don't need you to claim otherwise... I wonder...have you ever made an EV? If not, then zip it with your suggestion of making one......no? While you think your comments are full of information and somehow you think you are sophisticated, your paragraphs of bullsh*t stand to say that you really know nothing at the end. Pretending you're an expert at everything is amusing at best...I have to say you do score points for entertainment value though...keep it up!
          Noz
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @POLO: A 'simple driving basic EV, for $25 K , is not possible to produce, and if it was wouldn't sell profitably in any real volume." Absolute rubbish...of course it is...why not? What do you base that on? Profit can be made at any price point...so what should we do? Drive the planet into the ground so automakers can make 5% more profit? Is that what you think should happen? A base Focus is less than $20K...a loaded Focus is about $29K....that's a 45% increase over the base model's price....so rubbish on that comment also. More excuses from an apologist.
          Marco Polo
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @Noz Tell you what Noz, get yourself some money, (preferably your own) and try building a commercially viable EV. (Ok any EV). Then I, who have built or had built many EV's , will listen to you! Your ill-informed, simplistic nonsense, is always annoying, but occasionally, out of courtesy, I try to make a little sense from your rantings. (I should know better) Now go and join DF, in the corner!
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Noz
        Perhaps they do get it. They just want to milk as much money as they can out of the early adopters with extra high-margin gadgets & baubles. However, that may backfire on Ford. The really early adopters already picked up Leafs, Teslas, Volts, and Karmas. The Mitsubishi-i will be out before the FFE too. By the time the FFE hits the market, much of the early adopter market will be gone and they'll have to compete for normal consumers against 2nd generation products. And the 1st gen, out-sourced, $40K Ford compact won't do so well against them.
        Yespage
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Noz
        While I agree that a trimmed down version would be nice, I wonder if the Car was going to cost that much regardless and they pop the extra electronics in to make the price seem more worth it.
        DaveMart
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Noz
        Innovation has to be paid for. It has mostly arrived in the top models first, where margins are not so tight and some of the cost can be paid down.
      electronx16
      • 3 Years Ago
      The least Ford could have done was to use the stationwagon version as basis for the EV conversion. That would have provided at least some justification for the $4K price difference with the Leaf and it would have added something to the market that others weren't already doing better.
        Spec
        • 7 Months Ago
        @electronx16
        Good point. A PHEV mini-van would also be a nice vehicle for someone to build.
          Jim McL
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Spec
          Sounds like that Yulon is the one with the AC Propulsion drive train that was used in the Mini E? That thing rocks. Stronger regen than a Tesla.
          Marco Polo
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Spec
          @Spec Your wish is their command! Yulon Motors of the ROC, will release not one, but two Luxgen Mini-Vans models, in PHEV, EV and ICE configuration. Available now in the ROC and PRC markets. A US release is planned for 2012-3. High quality, and very competitively priced against Hyundai, Toyota, and Nissan.
        Marco Polo
        • 7 Months Ago
        @electronx16
        @electronx16 Interesting idea!
      BipDBo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just for the fun of it, I unraveled the whole comment thread and I'm marveling at it. 247 comments, and most of them are pretty long. For ABG, this is epic.
      Ford Future
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is a FAILURE of Ford Management. This is such a game changing vehicle, it should have been FORD's goal to make it the Number 1 selling EV, this year, and of All Time. Ford Management needs to crack a book and learn how to sell cars from a history of the company's original CEO: Henry Ford. This is a Model T moment.
        Sasparilla Fizz
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Ford Future
        There is actually a limitation that Ford Management is up against - they can't make many of these vehicles - it is supplier constrained (the EV architecture was supplier designed and pitched to Ford management) and (particularly with the batteries) you can't just add some more shifts and produce all you want cause you won't have the batteries and other plug in specific components there for the cars. Batts for these and hybrid vehicles are more akin to producing semiconductors than anything and require special factories that require years to build - look at the history of Toyota having to wait years to increase Prius production in the face of demand because the batt factory wasn't built and existing ones couldn't be throttled up like most factories. Ford doesn't have a big battery factory ready (nor one coming from what I understand) for the Focus Electric (unlike GM with their battery factory coming online this year (65k Volt packs a year) and Nissan with their US one by the end of the year (100k+ packs a year capacity). Ford is just dipping their toes in the water here, sadly. So Ford looked at the limited production limitation and (guessing) high demand and decided to go for Volt type pricing since they'll have way more people wanting them than they can produce. A rational choice, but I agree it doesn't show vision - but Ford management didn't have an EV program in the first place (the vision thing again - this vehicle was designed and pitched to Ford by a Canadian supplier that's why you have the trunk taken up by the inverter - the supplier wanted to make the EV architecture able to go into most small car designs since they were planning to pitch it to more than one manufacturer).
          Grendal
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Sasparilla Fizz
          Very true. However Tesla will create a production line from scratch, build a vehicle that is better than every other one in its class, with 1/10th the funds available to Ford. I suppose this just proves that Tesla will be the EV leader into the near future. I was hoping for more from the FFE. At least better than or equal to the Leaf.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Ford Future
        Unfortunately it is Nissan that is doing what Ford did with the Model T. Oh how we all miss the days when America was the smartest, most innovative, and produced good quality stuff... :(
          Ford Future
          • 7 Months Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Exactly. Back in the day when the CEO built Empires, and worried more about his product, then his stock price, and golden parachute.
        throwback
        • 7 Months Ago
        @Ford Future
        Based on how Ford has navigated the financial waters over the last 3 years, It seems to me they certainly know how to make and sell profitable cars.
      EZEE
      • 3 Years Ago
      Everyone read PR's post (the one that starts with 40k) and calm the eff down. It's like two down.
      • 3 Years Ago
      UDPATE?
      DaveMart
      • 3 Years Ago
      That is quite a bit lower than I had feared based on the stratospheric price of the Ford Connect. It seems that that $57,000 price was based on not having competition in the electric van segment. It is difficult to see this as a truly competitive price against the Leaf though, looks aside. I would doubt that they can do anything about the boot, as they are limited by using an existing body and presumably they packaged it as well as they could in the prototype. For the Fluence also based on an existing body Renault had to extend the body to get decent boot space. This would appear to me to be something of a 'buy American' play, with orders perhaps largely expected from Government and quasi-Government organisations, and big business conscious of their image. That rationale will be even thinner when the Nissan US factory opens. I don't want to be too negative though, as the price is better than I expected and also having electric cars on the road means that Ford have done a lot of the heavy lifting in R & D and getting a parts supply chain sorted, and increasing production and lowering price will now not need any fundamentally new work. The speed Ford is moving in the foot-race to electrification compared to Nissan perhaps does rather remind us that Ford was 108 last June though! ;-) Perhaps though what Ford really fancy is plug-in hybrids, and the Maxi will be more competitive.
        Michael
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        Dave, How many times must I tell you? The Transit Connect EV is an aftermarket vehicle not a Ford Product. It is completed by Azure Dynamics. Ford will sell one to you in the same sense that they sold the Saleen Mustangs.
          DaveMart
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Michael
          That was the only price indicator we had, and based on it I predicted entirely accurately that the Focus EV would be a lot more than the Leaf than people were hoping. The vehicle also appears on the Ford website and is based on the Ford so I don't really see why you are getting your knickers in a twist. And it is still a ridiculous price. I don't care that Ford distanced themselves from the product.
          DaveMart
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Michael
          That was the only price indicator we had, and based on it I predicted entirely accurately that the Focus EV would be a lot more than the Leaf than people were hoping. The vehicle also appears on the Ford website and is based on the Ford so I don't really see why you are getting your knickers in a twist. And it is still a ridiculous price. I don't care that Ford distanced themselves from the product.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        IMO, the $3k / 10% price premium suggests that Ford has done a very poor job of getting the supply chain straightened out. If Ford had done their homework, and leveraged their existing Hybrid technology & suppliers, they should have come in no higher than the Leaf. Ford is adapting an existing chassis & platform, using proven batteries & motors, etc. They don't have "first mover" costs like Nissan or GM. For the small numbers of cars they will sell, and not until spring of 2012, Ford should sell them at a loss, matching the Nissan price. If Ford doesn't establish national footprint and significant mindshare in 2012, they will never be competitive in this segment. The only good thing about Ford's strategy, is that they're not holding up the rear like Chrysler.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          SVX, The extra cost of the thermal management they have gone for on the battery is unknown. IMO the big reason for the price difference though is that Ford do not see electric cars as selling in volume, and so are set up for low volume. The extra cost of doing that per unit as against turning out the 550,000 EV's that Nissan/Renault are going for are substantial, so I am surprised that Ford have even got this close in price and I suspect that they will sell each one at a substantial loss. So this is more of a place marker than a competitor for the Leaf, and I suspect that Ford do not even want to sell too many as their losses would be higher given their basic production model, in the thousands rather than the hundreds of thousands. Let's hope the Maxi plug in is something Ford can put their hearts into.
          Dave R
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          The '12 Focus is never going to sell in high volume at this price. But I hope they apply everything they learn with this version to their next gen plugin.
          SVX pearlie
          • 3 Years Ago
          @SVX pearlie
          If Ford doesn't intend to sell EVs, they shouldn't bother. If they're releasing a DOA product, why not at least be consistent and slap a Lincoln badge on it?
      throwback
      • 3 Years Ago
      Looking forward to some road tests.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      "mated to a single-speed transmission" Single-speed transmission? That is an oxymoron.
        Dave
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        http://www.thefreedictionary.com/transmission "5. (Engineering / Mechanical Engineering) a system of shafts, gears, torque converters, etc., that transmits power, esp the arrangement of such parts that transmits the power of the engine to the driving wheels of a motor vehicle"
          JakeY
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Dave
          @SVX pearlie "A single drive shaft is not a system, nor does it have gears or torque converters." Doesn't the differential have gears and don't you need gears to perform the reduction?
          SVX pearlie
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Dave
          A single drive shaft is not a system, nor does it have gears or torque converters.
          SVX pearlie
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Dave
          Guys, a differential is not a transmission, either. The gears are to allow the left and right wheels to turn smoothly, while transferring torque from the power shaft, not to adjust torque going int. The Final Drive reduction is an artifact of having to drive the diff ring of the diff.
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 7 Months Ago
          @Dave
          It has reduction gears.
        SVX pearlie
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        I agree with Spec. Direct drive to final drive reduction in the diff housing doesn't count as a "transmission".
        Neil Blanchard
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Well, it is a step down gear to provide more torque and to let the motor rev higher. It transmits the power, so it is technically a transmission. It probably also has the differential in it? Neil
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Technically it's called a gear reduction.
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