Good brakes may be less important in stock car racing than in other forms of motorsport, but on a plane, they're pretty darn important. That's what Rick Hendrick found out – the hard way – last night when his private jet crashed off the runway in Key West, Florida.

Hendrick's Gulfstream G150, registered to Jimmie Johnson (one of Hendrick's star drivers), slid straight off the runway and almost into the water when its brakes apparently failed upon landing. On board together with the NASCAR team owner were his wife Linda and two pilots. Fortunately, CNN reports that no one was seriously injured.

The incident must have been especially traumatic for the Hendricks, who lost seven members of their family – including their son Ricky who drove for and ran the team with his dad – in a 2004 plane crash. However, the Hendricks aren't the only ones to have been affected by plane crashes: Fellow NASCAR team owner Jack Roush has survived two such incidents, while off-road racer Rick Huseman and his brother Jeff were killed in a small plane crash in California a couple of weeks ago.

Click past the jump to watch an Associated Press report on the crash.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 13 Comments
      Skylar Ross Toups
      • 3 Years Ago
      Im sure it was terrifying for them. Being involved in a plane crash after having your son and other family members die in one has got to be traumatizing.
      healthtrekker
      • 3 Years Ago
      Weird. Sounds like they, or their contractors have been seriously negligent in the routine tip-to-tail scheduled maintenance. They must have effed up pretty bad, as the Takeoff-Distance for a MTOW, fully-fueled, fully-loaded G150 is 5000ft., and the Landing-Distance is just 2880. ++And these guys managed to go 700' past a 4800' tarmac on a plane that stalls at 112kts... ...Probably time to fire all your pilots, groundcrew, maintenance, and start over from scratch. . (i wonder how much lb. thrust % can be reversed after they flare, touch down & dump the airbrake panels)
      SloopJohnB
      • 3 Years Ago
      Makes you wonder who was responsible for brake maintenance.
      JR
      • 3 Years Ago
      Lot of factors at play here. Landing,hot,heavy and long at night on a short(4800ft) runway w/o thrust reversers active?? may have felt like no brakes. Lots of redundancy built in to Gulfstreams. Have to read the NTSB report when done.
      dukeisduke
      • 3 Years Ago
      Thank goodness no one was hurt. I'd sure like to know why their brakes failed; some mechanic has some 'splainin' to do, to the FAA and NTSB.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        hmmwv
        • 3 Years Ago
        Not all jets have reverse thrust, but the picture suggest the engines on this Gulfstream does. It's also possible that the pilot touched down too far down the runway.
      diffrunt
      • 3 Years Ago
      I read once that the end of Daytona race day's worst traffic jam is on the nearby airport runway, not on the surrounding highways.
      Sik68
      • 3 Years Ago
      Glad they're okay...the plane number has 48 and JJ in it. And apparently the plane is also most comfortable on banking and turning left.
        Tom Winch
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Sik68
        There's a reason for that. According to early news reports, the plane is actually owned by Jimmy Johnson Racing.
      bleexeo
      • 3 Years Ago
      They should have bought a 'real' Gulfstream instead of that mutant IAI.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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