It's not often that a mainstream automaker sets its sights on building a world-class supercar, but a few standout examples come to mind: cars like the Acura NSX, the Ford GT, the Dodge Viper, and the Lexus LFA.

Of course, none of these projects simply materialized overnight. Each took years of development, fine-tuning, tweaking and, in the case of the LFA, going back to the drawing board. Toyota spent years on the car's development and put some of its best personnel on the job. Lexus has now documented the LFA's development in a ten-minute video.

Follow the jump to watch it in full and see how the LFA went from idea to aluminum concept car to carbon fiber reality, through its rigorous development at the Nürburgring, the tragic loss of Hiromu Naruse and the victorious Nordschleife lap time.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 56 Comments
      Richie Rich
      • 3 Years Ago
      standing ovation
      H.E. Pennypacker
      • 3 Years Ago
      the lfa engine looks like the head of a cyberdemon.
      Duane
      • 3 Years Ago
      Amazing just amazing! ten years and its worth the wait!
      XT6Wagon
      • 3 Years Ago
      shame they forgot to make it safer than a BMW 325i oh well.
        miketim1
        • 3 Years Ago
        @XT6Wagon
        Its a shame your able to comment on this website.
      ntcougar7
      • 3 Years Ago
      LFA is a bit rice supercar... All show not really go for that price.
        morton the cat
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ntcougar7
        A Rolex and a Timex can both tell time, but are you really going to say that you'd rather have the latter?
        LOLWUT_
        • 3 Years Ago
        @ntcougar7
        Oh were you in the market for a 700K sports car? ... maybe 300K?.. nope? ...200K?... nope.... 100K?.... nope... 30K?.... oh.... then no need to get opinion from you then. This car is sold out and still in demand, so clearly target demographic buyers have been satisfied.
      Finklestein
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh yeah, it's real hard to write a check to Yamaha to build an engine...
        Bruce Lee
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Finklestein
        It's not hard to write a check to Yamaha but the motor in the LFA was made totally in-house. Yamaha's musical instrument division helped tune the sound but Yamaha didn't do any of the engine design. It's similar to how Toyota's F1 program was done in-house as well on purpose.
        Duane
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Finklestein
        another idiotic comment!
          Finklestein
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Duane
          Coming from someone named "Duane" that is really saying something...
      MAX
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yeah Mopar's $80,000 car beat Lexus $400,000 car and there's an upgraded Viper on the way to really rub it in.
        donnieorama
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MAX
        And you (and all of us) can't afford either! So what're you complaining about again?
        Krishan Mistry
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MAX
        While we're at it, a Japanese literbike costing 17K would smoke an 80K Viper, while getting roughly twice the mpg. Uncomparable? So is comparing a hammer to a scalpel. I dont need to say which car is which.
          Elmo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Krishan Mistry
          Have you watched both videos? The LF-A was just as uneasy around the corners as the Viper was around the Nurburgring. So saying it's a scalpel would be a bit much.
          billfrombuckhead
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Krishan Mistry
          Wouldn't want to take a scalpel to a hammer fight. I hope Ralph Gilles SRT division takes it as a mission statement for the next Viper to smash this ridiculous TuRD for Paris Hilton with the biggest hammer possible.
        billfrombuckhead
        • 3 Years Ago
        @MAX
        Watch it and weep whalekiller fans
          Elmo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @billfrombuckhead
          I see now... This is MAX under a different name...
      mitytitywhitey
      • 3 Years Ago
      What sets this car apart from the Italians may be reliability. When Autoblog tested the LFA, it had 13,000+ miles on it, street and track miles. AB author said it was fresh as the day it came from the factory. AB said no other supercar maker has ever delivered a 'tester' car to them with any kind of miles on them before. It's one thing to slap sticky tires on a big engine and call it fast. It's quite another to give it 'Lexus-like' reliability to a hyper-fast car (mind you this thing is faster than all the other exotics with inferior tires, and only slightly slower than the ACR. This is a competent chassis, to be sure. Lexus is sandbagging it by not giving it PS Cups like its competition). So if anyone is still wondering why this car might be worth it to the exotic collector... its meant to be DRIVEN. Not a garage queen like all those Italians you see with 5000 miles on them after 5 years of ownership. You probably would need to buy 2 exotics at 1/2 the price just so you have one working when you want to go for a drive. Waiting for all the 'I owned a Ferrari and it was the most reliable vehicle ever' made-up anecdotes. Lol.
        Hatzenbach
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        "to give it 'Lexus-like' reliability" do you remember the LF-A breaking down in the introduction lap of the 24h of the ring in 2010? and no, it didn't had 13000 miles on it. the components in >500 hp supercars suffer a lot and break from time to time. don't act like the lf-a would be any different cos it's a toyota and that's why it's just as reliable as a camry. the didn't have enough press cars, that's why it had so many miles on it and you can be sure that it spent a lot of time in maintenance before being handed over to the next journalists. you're waiting for someone to praise the reliability of a Ferrari? do you even realize that you're doing exactly the same with a Lexus you've never even seen in real life?
        Arjuna
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        I think the most novel part of this car is the engineering that went into this car will trickle down to more affordable cars. The carbon fiber weaving machine that was developed in house was expensive to develop, but will make carbon fiber cars more affordable.
        Bruce Lee
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        The best part is that Lexus even tried to find people who were actually willing to drive these and just garage queen them on purpose.
        Hailey Martin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        Just because the LF-A has a Lexus badge won't mean it'll be "cheap to maintain". That's complete and utter bullshit. Supercars are expensive to maintain and keep running. Fact. Anyone who buys a supercar and expects Honda Civic maintenance costs is a moron.
        LOLWUT_
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        I wouldnt be surprise to see a 150K Mile LFA 10 years from now..... Your correct though, Ferraris are gun sports cars but man, it'll cost you as much as the car itself maintaining it towards clocking 50,000 miles.... If LFA can be "maintained" around the same price as your Lexus ISF, I think you give it a couple extra notches and points above the other exotics.
        miketim1
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mitytitywhitey
        A SUPERCAR with 13,000 miles ??? Unheard of !
      unsivilaudio
      • 3 Years Ago
      Interesting they left out the ironic part about Hiromu Naruse being killed in an LFA prototype.
        ChrisDPrice
        • 3 Years Ago
        @unsivilaudio
        Technically, unsivilaudio is correct. They did NOT mention the vehicle he was driving when killed. They ONLY mentioned he was killed on the roads surrounding the track. Mentioning briefly that he was killed in a prototype would have implied questions about the prototype's safety, which this video was not intended to address. And Yu Yung, the video SHOWED nothing. The narrator stated that he died, they showed a picture of him, and a generic photo of a road. If the video DID show it (as you state), we would have seen a photo of the crashed prototype. Say yes to drugs.
        Yu Yung Shin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @unsivilaudio
        Layoff on smoking so much crack! The video DID show it. Say no to drugs.
        Krishan Mistry
        • 3 Years Ago
        @unsivilaudio
        It was mentioned near the end, but really brief. Should have been a bit more.
      Jonathan Arena
      • 3 Years Ago
      "Set on road tires"... my ass. It's embarrassing that so many car fans are ignorant enough to believe that crap.
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jonathan Arena
        Uh it was set on road tires. Usually when the tires are rated by the DOT, they're road tires. What you're referring to is race tires, in which none of the cars at the top used.
      Georg
      • 3 Years Ago
      amazing that every manufactor claim what ever they like... hey Lexus The Gumpert Apollo Speed is as much production car as the 50time build special Nür Edition and was already quicker on normal road tires 2years earlyer... there is no big different between the 500planed LFA including 50 Nür Editins and a Gumpert Apollo yearly production capability of 60car since 2006
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
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