Ford has officially added another model to the company's licensed reproduction steel body shells. Those looking to spin their own wrenches toward restoring a 1964 1/2, 1965 or 1966 Mustang Convertible can snap up a brand-new body from Dynacorn that uses higher-quality steel and more modern welding techniques than the originals. Even better, every last inch of the piece comes rustproofed straight from the factory. That means you can save the pennies and time you would have blown on cutting out cancer (rust and rot) and welding in new pieces and put both toward designing the perfect 289 for your build.

Ford and Dynacorn plan to show off the reproduction 1965 Mustang Convertible body shell at this year's SEMA show. If you like what you see, the two companies will be happy to send one your way for the reasonable sum of $15,000.

As you may recall, Dynacorn produces a number of body panels for a wide range of classic vehicles, including a complete 1969 Ford Mustang body shell. Hit the jump for the full press release.
Show full PR text
America's Favorite Classic Mustang – the '65 Convertible – Returns with All-New Ford-Approved Body Shell

The original Mustang – America's favorite classic convertible – can now be assembled complete with all-new Ford-approved restoration parts

New first-generation Mustang body shells can be made into '64½, '65 or '66 models, depending on the trim and powertrain that is installed during the rebuild

New '65 Mustang body shells are made with stronger steel and use modern welding techniques, making them better than the original


DEARBORN, Mich., Oct. 30, 2011 – It's a classic car lover's dream come true: Now it is possible to build a '64½, '65 or '66 Mustang convertible from the wheels up using the all-new Ford-approved and officially licensed body shell.

The body shell for the original Mustang convertible, now in production and available for restorers as a Ford-licensed restoration part, gives classic car enthusiasts a new option in putting their classic dream Mustang ragtop back on the road.

"The 1964-66 Mustang is the most restored vintage vehicle. But the number of original 1964-66 vintage bodies is shrinking every year," said Dennis Mondrach, Ford Restoration Parts licensing manager. "Most of the original Mustangs left in scrapyards are rusted or wrecked beyond repair. The new body shell is made of virgin metal and uses modern welding techniques. It comes rustproofed, and after final adjustment and finish preparation of the body panels, it is ready for painting and final assembly."

To build a restored Mustang using the new shell, the powertrain, suspension and brakes, the electrical systems, the interior and trim can either be bought new or transferred from an existing car to the new body. Original parts that can't be reused from an old Mustang can be replaced with Ford-approved restoration parts. Mondrach says that nearly all the parts needed to build a complete new 1964-66 Mustang convertible, except for some minor body hardware, are now available from Ford-approved classic parts suppliers.

Ford-approved Mustang restoration parts can be found at www.fordrestorationparts.com.

For a restoration part to be approved by Ford, suppliers must meet or exceed the fit, finish and quality of the original, said Mondrach. In order to keep classic Ford-built vehicles on the road, Ford allows parts suppliers access to original technical drawings, blueprints and specifications for parts.

The new body shell can not only save restorers time and money, but enable them to build a strong, well-engineered classic.

"Instead of spending money fixing rust and welding in new panels, restorers can now simply transfer their powertrain, interior and trim parts onto the new body shell," said Mondrach.

The '65 Mustang body shell is constructed of higher-grade steel than the original, said Jim Christina, vice president of Dynacorn International, the Ford-approved company that is manufacturing the '65 Mustang. "We use a modern universal automotive-grade steel that is actually stronger than the original, and modern welding techniques along with more welds to strengthen the body," Christina said.

The '65 body is in production now and can be delivered by freight truck to any address. The '65 Mustang body includes the doors and trunk lid and all the sheet metal from the radiator support to the taillight panel except the hood and front fenders. Those items are available separately. The '65 Mustang body shell starts at $15,000.

America's love affair with the original Mustang is still going strong after nearly 50 years. Debuting in April 1964, the original Mustang sold more than 1.2 million units – including more than 174,000 convertibles – before its first redesign in 1967. The 1964-66 Mustang has long been America's most popular classic car of the postwar era. It is frequently the No. 1 most insured car at Hagerty Insurance, the world's No. 1 insurer of classic and collectible cars.

The new body shell can be made into a 1964½, 1965 or 1966 Mustang, based on the powertrains and trim parts added to it. It is the third classic Mustang body shell now available to restorers. The other two are the 1967-68 and the 1969-70 fastback bodies.

Ford will display a new 1965 Mustang body shell Nov. 1-3 at the Specialty Equipment Marketing Association (SEMA) show in Las Vegas. It will be parked next to a restored 1965 convertible to demonstrate the high quality of the assembly.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      Vergenbuurg
      • 3 Years Ago
      Call it heresy, but I honestly think a modern V6 Mustang drivetrain mated to this bodyshell would make for something interesting... not a barn-burner, but not slow, either, with rather good fuel economy.
        adrive7
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Vergenbuurg
        Considering the best you could do in 65 was a 289 making about 225 hp, I'd say the 305 hp V6 from the current Mustang would be pretty awesome.
          mbmorrow4
          • 3 Years Ago
          @adrive7
          Actually, the top of the line 289 was the HiPo at 271hp (Gross) Today's hp ratings are net (with accessories and exhaust). The 2011 305hp V-6 would easily surpass the original 289. It just won't sound quite as cool. 45 years of technology has made for a lot of improvements. I have a '64 1/2 convertible that I restored 15 years ago. I looked at a lot of really rusted cars before in bought my relatively clean one. It doesn't take much time to spend $15k trying to save a rusted body that needs floors, torque boxes, rockers, quarters and rear frame rails.
        Number23
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Vergenbuurg
        I would think so, 312hp is fair bit more than the original came with.
        adrive7
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Vergenbuurg
        That said, the new V6 is very quiet, and noise is part of the fun in a car like this. A lot of the fun, really.
          Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @adrive7
          put a loud exhaust on it. V6s sound fine with a bit of a mellow snarl.
        JonZeke
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Vergenbuurg
        I Agree as well, a V6 (supercharged? :D) would be a sweet combo... ...but being a child of the turbo-4 generation I wonder what a 2013 Focus ST turbo mill might be like in there. You could turn a coupe version into a crazy drift machine with a blowoff valve soundtrack...
      kelar77
      • 3 Years Ago
      Man I hope other manufactures jump on this bandwagon, and license their old shells. I would love to be able to buy a FD RX-7 shell or a Mark IV Toyota Supra in a few years
        Carbon Fibre
        • 3 Years Ago
        @kelar77
        This! Dude, you nailed my thoughts exactly before heading to the comments. Since my future car will be a MKIV Supra (youngling here) I find this nothing but excitement seeing these companies produce parts like this. Of course, NOTHING replace the original untouched material if you go by the extreme side, but at least this is some what "official" by having Ford interfere with this instead of some copy cat cheap kits or something. Wow.
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @kelar77
        I don't think Japanese manufacturers will EVER do this.
      Carman
      • 3 Years Ago
      This may sound like it's overdoing it, but this is genuious! There are so many desired classics out there that need a second chance. Having this kind of resource is priceless!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      DMAG
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't know much about these repros, but are you required to already have a VIN for the car before you buy these shells in order for it to be street legal?
      cashsixeight
      • 3 Years Ago
      So if they won't allow vin swaps from a rusty but desirable car to a rust free v6 model, how is this legal? I really do not see the difference.
      FRENZIED
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is awesome! I'm holding out for a 2nd-gen Falcon repro body (which shouldn't be too hard for Dynacorn to make seeing how the Mustang is based on the Falcon platform).
      50 AKA Ferrari
      • 3 Years Ago
      It varies from state to state folks. Each state has different rules about registration and VIN rules/classifications.
      waetherman
      • 3 Years Ago
      Maybe I'm a bit of a purist, but a re-issued body just seems like cheating to me; less restoration, more knock off kit car. That said I can certainly appreciate that someone might do something interesting with this kind of a body that one would never do with an actual 64.5, like chopping it in interesting ways, giving it modern drivetrain etc. I still prefer my mustangs in all-original form though.
      Paradigm ♂♂
      • 3 Years Ago
      :'( I want this..
      LostBoyz
      • 3 Years Ago
      coupe also or just vert?
      ammca66564
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's amazing. The car is effectively still in production 47 years later. That's the mark of a classic, I tell you.
    • Load More Comments