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  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe front

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe front

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe front 3/4

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe chassis

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe suspension

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe fuel tank

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe suspension

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe interior

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe seat

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe door panel

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe seat

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe seat detail

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe seat detail

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe front 3/4

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe bumper detail

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe license plate

  •  ICON Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe gauges

Ladies and gentleman, this is what SEMA should be about. Behold the latest from Icon, the Derelict – a 1952 Chevrolet Deluxe Business Coupe hiding a full arsenal of modern engineering beneath over half a century of patina.

The vehicle uses a complete powder-coated Art Morrison chassis with a front independent suspension and a four-link rear. An all-aluminum, fuel-injected 6.2-liter General Motors LS3 V8 sits between the frame rails and cranks out 430 horsepower. The engine is mated to a 4L65E automatic transmission and a full set of six-piston brakes with anti-lock control ensures that the whole party can come to a stop in a timely fashion. Despite looking like junkyard relics, the wheels are actually custom CNC-machined pieces shod in ZR-rated BF Goodrich rubber.

If the Coupe's mechanicals and exterior aren't enough to flip your switches, take a peek indoors. Both seats have been recovered in a combination of wild-caught alligator and buffalo hides(!) that have been dyed to the same Hermes hue as John F. Kennedy's briefcase. The carpet is Rolls-Royce Wilton wool bound in buffalo as well, and an Aston Martin vintage mohair headliner finishes out the indoors. An array of tech is also tastefully hidden away as well, including Focal and Parrot audio components with Bluetooth capability.

This sort of execution is so far above and beyond the typical restomod and tuner fodder we typically see from the SEMA crowd that it serves as a breath of fresh air. If you like what you see, Icon says that the company can do the same for nearly any vehicle from the '30s to the '70s.

Gentlemen, start your imaginations. The Icon Derelict 1952 Chevrolet Business Coupe will be on display at this year's SEMA show.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 68 Comments
      jwarjward
      • 3 Years Ago
      FYI gentlemen, My name is Jonathan and I designed and built this car. Good custom design and build work is like an art, it is an opinion. Therefore, not for everyone. That is why there are so many different styles and approaches. That is what the new cars sitting in a line at the dealerships are for! This build represents my ideas and vision, for better or worse! The patina is 100% real, as found in a barn in Texas. Each Derelict I build is based on finding the right patina car. We also build Reformers, which are concours restored as new, hiding the modern chassis and other goodies. Thanks for (almost) everyones support! :-) JW
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      dukeisduke
      • 3 Years Ago
      My grandfather had a '51 DeLuxe four-door, and his was just plain derelict, including the riveted-in sheet metal driver's floorboard, installed by a local sheet metal shop.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      JamesG
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here's another low key and unassuming "derelict" racer, a '52 Chrysler Town & Country..love it! http://www.hotrod.com/featuredvehicles/hrdp_1104_the_derelict_1952_chrysler_town_country/viewall.html
      Jim R
      • 3 Years Ago
      PAINT. THAT. DAMN. CAR.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      to your email L
      • 3 Years Ago
      Jeez just go all the way and give it a factory spec paint job, as some other comments alluded to, looks like it should be driven down a Havana street.
        JamesG
        • 3 Years Ago
        @to your email L
        You're missing the point...the paint job (old/patina or lack of it) gives it's unassuming "sleeper" effect.
        David Spillman
        • 3 Years Ago
        @to your email L
        kinda defeats the purpose ;)
      stickshiftn69
      • 3 Years Ago
      i think this car is friggin awesome... and california is NOT the place to have it lol, since you know how that state is LOL i'm very surprised, i thought the wonderful, non-hybrid car-loving state of California didn't let anyone register any cars made before 2006, except maybe steve jobs, but he was very rich so he probably thought he was above the law anyway environmentalist commie tree huggers
        Kyle Potter
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stickshiftn69
        I registered my 2002 M3 in California....and I get about 9 miles to the gallon when I "zip" around town ;D
      motoramic
      • 3 Years Ago
      This car is definetly a sleeper car! I want one!!!
      artandcolour2010
      • 3 Years Ago
      it's completely fantastic, inside and out. I only take exception to the term "business coupe" for the way this car is modified. "Business coupes" didn't have rear seats. The rear compartment was left empty for the business man's "wares." This 2-door bodystyle's short greenhouse and long deck with a back seat was actually called the Club Coupe. Pedantic, I know, but every other detail is worked out perfectly, the name should be too.
      masonperegrine
      • 3 Years Ago
      Absolutely stunning.
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