The Detroit News reports that Chevrolet may take a page out of the Disney playbook to improve the automaker's customer service and its appeal in the California market.

Chevrolet dealers are headed to classes at Disneyland in Anaheim, California, to learn some of the magical secrets employed by the amusement park to make visitors feel that they've had a special experience. The report says that some of the tips shared include the fact that no Disney Prince or Princess ever smokes in public and that sometimes, it's better to say less to ensure that a customer has a positive impression of their visit.

In addition to polishing its customer service, Chevrolet is rolling out a volley of new, smaller and more fuel-efficient vehicles targeted directly at Californians and renovating its aging dealerships. The brand has picked 100 dealers in the Los Angeles, San Diego and San Francisco areas and offered between $500,000 and $1.5 million for improvements, including a new, uniform front entrance. The moves are designed to pull Chevrolet back from its Southern, Midwestern truck-based focus.


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  • 16 Comments
      MANARC100
      • 3 Years Ago
      Make it magical with the staff all in costume and singing while not negotiating at all and chaning the coke machine from 50 cents to 5 dollars. Hmm I see how that could work.
      Rich M
      • 3 Years Ago
      Eliminate the sales staff entirely, eliminate rebates and incentives, and sell every car at just enough profit to cover costs. THAT would be a magical experience.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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      Brett
      • 3 Years Ago
      Less can certainly be more. We recently stopped at another brand's dealership cause I was just starting my search for a vehicle, and was being addressed by a member of the sales team before I could close the door on my car. Said I was just looking, and was followed around the entire time I tried to browse, constantly pelted with questions. No way in the world I'll buy anything from that dealership. I understand a certain level of aggressive salesmanship, but you also have to have some talent for reading the customer. The only thing that salesman closed that day was the guarantee that I would never return.
      kontroll
      • 3 Years Ago
      California being the turd world subcontinent state of the United States, will not buy enough of anything from anybody to make any difference. While the rest of the country is thriving economically this state's major preoccupation is to figure out at what precise temperature to serve the school lunch to the kids of the illegal immigrants. Might as well reunite with with Mexico, that's where they belong. Hasta la vista
      • 3 Years Ago
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      starrizerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'll say this...If anyone were to approach me at a dealership acting so much as ANYTHING like Mickey Mouse, I'd kick their A$$
      chasegarcia
      • 3 Years Ago
      This looks like a good move by Chevy. I hate going to dealers.
      Mike Tyson
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's a crap car after all...It's a crap car after all... it's a crap crap car....
      Matrix
      • 3 Years Ago
      What are they goin to do? Sing the song "Be Our Guest" from beauty and the beast to Every costumer? Lol that would be funny.
      Kevin Gregerson
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's not really a secret to Disneyland success. Their primary success comes from developing the customer experience such that its seemless and magical. They plan it out step by step, then test it out, throw a bunch of monkey wrenches at it to get a good idea of what it looks like and rebuild on it, then they building it, test it out for themselves, and get consensus on it before sending it out to the public. If there are any issues when it hits public give out refunds for NDAs, close off the area and apologise until its fixed seemless. If GM wants to be successful, they should take a page out of the Vegas dealership service departments some years back. I've never had a dealership say to me that they are too booked up to take it that day but the other one has some time and then transfer me to them with a guy he's familiar with. The other dealer got me towed and got me a new water pump installed with a new belt and gave me a carwash within 3 hours. Even gave me a ride to my hotel and back. Sure, it was a 500 dollar deal covered under warranty. But, If I knew that level of service was consistent across all the dealers, I'd be a GM customer for life with 100k warranty on everything I buy. Contrast this experience with my nieghbor's 2008 525i which has gone back and forth to the service department 3 times before they figure out he has a bad battery and apparently a 3rd bad continental tire which had sidewall bubbling on the inside(stay away from continental) . It's got 26k miles on it and 2 months from turning in at the end of the lease. He's decided that he's never getting another BMW.
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