Here's a useful tip for all you would-be Chevrolet Corvette thieves out there: If you happen to find yourself in a Vette with the windows up and the doors locked when the battery goes dead, there's an actual mechanical release for the door mechanism squirreled away inside.

We won't tell you exactly where it is, because, well, that sort of takes the fun out of things. Just ask one would-be joyrider in Price George, British Columbia. The 21-year-old man saw a Corvette idling with the door open, hopped inside, rolled up the windows and locked the doors. What he didn't see was that the owner had just put away his battery charger.

When the thief stalled the car trying to back out of the driveway, he found himself in one very dead piece of American engineering with no way to escape (that he knew of). Despite his efforts to break the side glass with a hatchet and pry open the door with a screw driver, police arrived on the scene and were happy to help him out of the vehicle and into a cell after charging him with multiple theft and weapons offenses.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 42 Comments
      xmailboxcancerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      If every car had this feature (instant jail cell), car thefts would be eliminated.
      Thomas
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wait....where did he get the hatchet?
        m
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Thomas
        It's Prince George, BC. Everybody has a hatchet.
        dukeisduke
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Thomas
        And duct tape. Just ask Red Green.
      Brian D
      • 3 Years Ago
      Dead batteries are common place in sports cars that aren't used as daily drivers. I'll bet half of all ultra sports cars like the Corvette are lucky to hit the streets a couple times a month. This happened in British Columbia where the weather magnifies the situation. This Corvette probably didn't run for 6 months during the winter, and it wouldn't take much non driving in the summer to have a dead battery. I bet there are just as many motorcycles sitting in garages with dead batteries as there are driving down the street. A Corvette is a toy just like a motorcycle or jet ski.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        EXP Jawa
        • 3 Years Ago
        What is, exactly? Not making it obvious how to exit an inoperative vehicle? We've got the same (or similar) problem with an '08 CTS in the company fleet. If it sits for too long, the battery inevitably goes dead. The doors have an electric assist in the handle, and with no power, they won't open from the outside. We have to leave the windows down when parked in the shop. At least, though, the inside door handles are obvious and will still open the door...
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EXP Jawa
          jawnath1n: No, the CTS doesn't have a keyhole to open the trunk. And my wagon doesn't have a keyhole in the rear hatch either. I honestly don't know how I get in if the power goes out. I presumed that the front handles still work, you just had to pull them twice. But maybe I'm wrong. I guess it's time to find my manual.
          jawnath1n
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EXP Jawa
          Have you checked above license plate where the plate lights are? That is where it is on the C6 along with the button to pop the hatch open. It is quite hidden and not in plain sight. There has gotta be a way to open the door with the battery dead from the outside of the vehicle.
      oRenj9
      • 3 Years Ago
      Haha, I remember going to the Corvette Museum and sitting in a new Corvette. They had a lady whose job it is to open the doors. Fun fact: you can't get INTO the car with a dead battery either, the levers for the doors are in the hatch or some-such, so the lady had to reach into the car and pull the lever on the floor to open the door. All I can say is that, at least this guy got trapped in a Corvette he didn't own. That is much better than the videos of idiot owners trapping themselves in their own car because they are know-it-alls that refuse to read their damn owner's manual.
      PaulC
      • 3 Years Ago
      This article is fake. No way this could have happened, it was written to catch your eye with the catchy title only to draw you in and let you read a bunch of made-up ****.
      454
      • 3 Years Ago
      Five bucks says this guys sue's GM and wins
        • 3 Years Ago
        @454
        [blocked]
        Basil Exposition
        • 3 Years Ago
        @454
        It's Canada, not the US
          Billy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          Oh, So that's how he got the hatchet.
          eliotsmeliot
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Basil Exposition
          So? If GM wants to continue selling cars in Canada, they will honor a judgment from a Canadian court. Besides, I'm sure they have assets in Canada.
      Brian D
      • 3 Years Ago
      Worx2749, I'm sure every vehicle sold has just as many dead battery issues, but it's a big deal in a corvette because the doors won't open. You would hear a lot more about dead batteries in other vehicles if the doors wouldn't open with a dead battery. BTW, Dead batteries are common place in sports cars that aren't used as daily drivers. I'll bet half of all ultra sports cars like the Corvette are lucky to hit the streets a couple times a month. This happened in British Columbia where the weather magnifies the situation. This Corvette probably didn't run for 6 months during the winter, and it wouldn't take much non driving in the summer to have a dead battery. I bet there are just as many motorcycles sitting in garages with dead batteries as there are driving down the street. A Corvette is a toy just like a motorcycle or jet ski.
      Gorgenapper
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've said this before and I'll say this again. Why isnt the mechanical door release built into the inside door handles like on any other car with a smart key? My MS3's door levers (on the inside) can unlock the door with or without battery power. I like the Corvette, and I admire it...but I'm still lost when it comes to the reasoning behind that engineering decision.
        Thorlius
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gorgenapper
        Because it's a large not-so-attractive lever. Sure, they could design something into the handle, but I don't think it's necessary. Seriously though, it was one of the first things I found when I got my Corvette earlier this year. "Hmm, what's this here for? Oh look, the door opened." Who needs a manual to find it? All these stories of this happening make me facepalm. These people should not own a Corvette. It's -almost- like Darwin's theory in action, in this case - the guy isn't dead, but he's in jail for being a dumbass on two accounts (one for trying to steal a car, the other for getting stuck in it).
          razorpit
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Thorlius
          I'm sure the stress level increased big time when he found out he couldn't get out. You mind can do strange things under stress. Obvious solutions to simple problems disappear.
        Rotation
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gorgenapper
        Because these doors don't work like that. There's no mechanical connection from the handles (inside or outside) to the lock. The reason to do this is it's far simpler, lighter and even cheaper. And it works better to boot as long as the power is on. A regular lock has a latch, a rod to pull the latch, an inside handle to pull the rod and an outside handle to pull the rod. Then it has a lock mechanism to defeat the unlatching and a switch to control the lock mechanism, and a key slot and a mechanism from the key slot to move the switch to control the lock mechanism. If it is power (nearly all are nowadays) then you also need a solenoid to move the lock mechanism to defeat the unlatching or not and some wire to the solenoid from the control system (CAN bus). This just a latch to hold the door shut and a solenoid to open the latch. Then it has an exterior and interior button to unlock the door and wire from the buttons to the control system (CAN bus) and wire from that to the solenoid. And that's it. No need for rods, handles, latch defeat mechanism. The door is always physically locked, when you press the interior button it opens. When you press the exterior button it opens if the software says the car doesn't consider itself locked. Much simpler, less to break. Much cheaper. Much lighter. You also don't have all the issues with what happens if you pull the outside handle when the car is locked. On recent cars if you have the fob in your pocket the door will unlock and open and that requires even more mechanism to both unlock and then "pull the handle" again for you to open it. With this system, it just sees you touched the exterior button, then it checks for the fob in your pocket and opens the door if authorized. You get all this and the downsides are tiny. Rarely does your car battery go flat.
      thePeterN
      • 3 Years Ago
      It happened to me too, at a car show. Took several minutes with a line of annoyed show-goers, until someone walked by and told me where the release was.
      Panoptic
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've always wondered how people manage to do this. Assuming you at least know how a manual works and have the parking brake off, with all of the torque they have, you'd have to be hideously uncoordinated to get it to stall. I can take off from a stop in my little 2 liter Honda without even touching the throttle...
        The_Zachalope
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Panoptic
        Unless the battery isn't holding a charge, then the system would become undercharged and stall out the engine.
        m
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Panoptic
        I've seen someone stall a Viper repeatedly. The pressure of driving an unfamiliar car in a time-crunch situation (as most any theft would be) can really throw off someone's driving skills. If they happened to have none in the first place, the situation will be even worse.
      50 AKA Ferrari
      • 3 Years Ago
      FAIL!
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