In 2009, Renault-Nissan CEO Carlos Ghosn stuck out his neck on electric vehicles when he said that he expects them to make up 10 percent of the new car market by 2020. A decade is a lot longer than ten years in the automotive industry, but Nissan remains confident in EV technology, as we can see in the Nissan Green Program 2016 it announced today.

Called a "mid-term environmental plan," the Green Program shares with us Nissan's big plans it hopes to reach by the end of fiscal year 2016. The biggest is to be the top seller of zero-emission vehicles with "cumulative sales of 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles across the Renault-Nissan Alliance." Aside from the Leaf and other EVs, this includes "development of an all-new fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) together with strategic partner, Daimler." Nissan recently said its fuel stack is the "world's best."

The other tent poles in the Green Program are a 35 percent increase in corporate average fuel economy compared with 2005 levels; 20 percent decrease in corporate CO2 emission (again compared to 2005 levels); and to increase the amount of recycled materials to 25 percent.

The 35 percent average fuel economy increase will be met, in part, by two new vehicles: a front-wheel drive hybrid model (the Altima hybrid replacement?) and a "plug-in hybrid model based on Nissan's unique technology." Looks like Ghosn is confident in more than zero emission vehicles.
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Nissan Announces New Mid-Term Environmental Plan

YOKOHAMA, Japan, October 24, 2011/PRNewswire/ --

- 70% of annual research and advanced engineering budget on environmental technologies -

Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. today announced its new six-year environmental plan, Nissan Green Program 2016 (NGP 2016). This new plan will focus on three areas: reduction of carbon footprint, shift to renewable energy and an increase in the diversity of resources used by Nissan.

Nissan Green Program 2016, the company's third environmental mid-term plan, aims to deliver the following by the end of fiscal year 2016:

- No.1 in Zero-Emission Vehicles: cumulative sales of 1.5 million zero-emission vehicles across the Renault-Nissan Alliance
- Leading fuel efficiency: 35% fuel economy improvement compared with 2005 on a corporate average for all Nissan vehicles sold in Japan, China, Europe and the United States
- Leading low corporate carbon footprint: 20% reduction per vehicle of CO2 emission of corporate activities compared with 2005
- Leading closed-loop recycling: raise the usage rate of recycled materials to 25%

"More consumers are demanding products in line with their values, including cars and trucks with a lower carbon footprint. At the same time, we are using technology to make our factories greener and more efficient," said Nissan President and Chief Executive Officer Carlos Ghosn. "Nissan wants to be part of the solution toward a sustainable society - for the sake of the planet and as a significant competitive advantage and a strategic differentiator in the global manufacturing sector."

NGP2016 represents the pillar of sustainability in Nissan's Blue Citizenship, the company's strategic platform covering the area of corporate social responsibility. Blue Citizenship focuses on three areas: Sustainability, Mobility and Community. Today's announcement of NGP 2016 is the first of many corporate initiatives under Blue Citizenship.

Detailed actions under NGP 2016 include:

1) No.1 in Zero-Emission Vehicles: cumulative sales of 1.5 million units of zero-emission vehicles by 2016 across the Renault-Nissan Alliance. On behalf of the Alliance, Nissan will lead the development of an all-new fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) together with strategic partner, Daimler.

2) Leading Fuel Efficiency: 35% fuel economy improvement compared with 2005 on a corporate average by launching products delivering class-leading fuel efficiency across a wide range of segments in Japan, China, Europe and the United States such as:


- An all-new front-wheel drive hybrid model
- An all-new plug-in hybrid model based on Nissan's unique technology
- Introducing a next-generation continuously variable transmission (CVT) and reach 20 million units of cumulative CVT production since Nissan's first launch in 1992

3) Leading low corporate carbon footprint

Reduce CO2 emissions corresponding to corporate activities by 20% per vehicle compared with 2005 through:


- Widening the scope of measurable objectives, including logistics, offices, and dealerships in addition to production sites
- Introduction of renewable energy sources for manufacturing and related facilities

4) Leading closed-loop recycling through being the first in the auto industry to set a recycling objective and adopt a comprehensive closed-loop recycling scheme, including steel, aluminum and plastic. Highlights include:

- Achieve a recycled resource usage rate of 25% by 2016
- Apply recycled materials from production waste or end-of-life vehicles and parts into new vehicles
- Reduce consumption of rare earth elements

Details of Nissan Green Program 2016

http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/ENVIRONMENT/APPROACH/GREENPROGRAM

About Nissan Nissan Motor Co., Ltd., Japan's second-largest automotive company, is headquartered in Yokohama, Japan, and is part of the Renault-Nissan Alliance. Operating with more than 248,000 employees globally, Nissan provided customers with more than 4.1 million vehicles in 2010, generating revenue of 8.77 trillion yen ($102.37 billion US). With a strong commitment to developing exciting and innovative products for all, Nissan delivers a comprehensive range of 64 models under the Nissan and Infiniti brands. A pioneer in zero-emission mobility, Nissan made history with the introduction of the Nissan LEAF, the first affordable, mass-market, pure-electric vehicle and winner of numerous international accolades, including the prestigious 2011 European Car of the Year award and 2011 World Car of the Year.

For more information on our products, services and commitment to sustainable mobility, visit our website at

http://www.nissan-global.com/EN

http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/IR (For IR)


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 36 Comments
      Michael Walsh
      • 3 Years Ago
      Carlos Ghosn is the man! But I don't think he'll be able to sell many vehilces.
        Dave
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Michael Walsh
        Youre right, Mike. Vehilces are a tough sell.
        Dave
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Michael Walsh
        As long as France keeps building nukes and taxing gas/diesel to death, Renault/Nissan will have a market for EVs.
          Dave
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          "I'm not really sure why you are ignoring the subsidies either, except as a way of supporting your disingenuous calculations." I am ignoring the subsidies because they are temporary. They are not part of the car. If you look at this from a macroeconomic view, not from the viewpoint of a potential buyer, you realize that someone is paying the $31,000 even if that someone is not the actual user of the vehicle.
          Dave
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          "Of course the gap is massive if you look for what cars can't do rather than what they can." I REPEAT: "Of course, there is a number of folks who will be perfectly happy with a 73 mile range. And, of those, many live in areas with relatively cheap electricity. To them I say, go for it."
          Dave
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          "I ran the figures for equalised taxes on fuel for cars, and although at the moment electric cars would certainly be less economic on that basis the gap is not huge." I disagree. The gap is massive. Take a ~$31,000 Nissan Leaf with a 73 mile range. Now add enough batteries to give it a barely acceptable range of 200 miles. It is now a ~$47,000 car. That is about $30,000 more expensive than a comparable ICE. The interest alone on that $30k is at least $1,000 per year. Of course, there is a number of folks who will be perfectly happy with a 73 mile range. And, of those, many live in areas with relatively cheap electricity. To them I say, go for it.
          Michael Walsh
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          Dave, I was making fun of the title misspelling - vehilces
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          Of course the gap is massive if you look for what cars can't do rather than what they can. It is rather like criticising a two seater sports car because it is lousy at shifting your fridge. However, on a sane level if you look at what they are designed for rather than what they are not the price difference for a city runabout is not that great if you go electric.
          Dave
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          "So you've worked out that people should choose cars based on their needs. Well done." WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG - People should choose cars based on their needs wants and desires. This is not a communist country nor should it be. "That still does not make the Leaf cost $47,000." No. It means that a Leaf with a range of 200 miles will cost at least $47,000. In actuality, the weight of the batteries would require chassis upgrades that would make it cost more. "Your luxury ICE for $17,000 is obviously thrown in to add to the gaiety of nations also." WHAT? Luxury ICE? A Cruz or Focus etc. sells for about $17,000. And it provides all of the interior space and performance of a Leaf. A Leaf is not a Luxury car.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          So you've worked out that people should choose cars based on their needs. Well done. That still does not make the Leaf cost $47,000. Your luxury ICE for $17,000 is obviously thrown in to add to the gaiety of nations also.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          I'm not really sure why you are ignoring the subsidies either, except as a way of supporting your disingenuous calculations.
          DaveMart
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dave
          Hi Dave. I ran the figures for equalised taxes on fuel for cars, and although at the moment electric cars would certainly be less economic on that basis the gap is not huge. We can use the US as a proxy for no fuel taxes compared to Europe and the break even is at something like petrol at $4-4.50/US gallon. They have the subsidy to make up, and fuel taxes to equalise so their cost goals can fairly be described as challenging, but once the manufacturing is running at full tilt BEVs should be inherently more cost effective than ICE. To run the first few million BEVs France can simply run their nuclear power stations more of the time, and hence more efficiently ( they can ramp power from them to some degree, unlike US designs, and the new ones will power up and down just fine ) I forget the exact figures which will anyway depend on when people charge, but France can run something like 7 million BEVs before needing a single new power station. They would displace France's 100% imported oil.
      lne937s
      • 3 Years Ago
      Looks like some of that 1.5MM vehicles may include heavy commercial vehicles http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/NEWS/2011/_STORY/111025-01-e.html
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @lne937s
        Good find. The economics of trucks are better than for cars too, as many of them run on constant routes and so the range can be catered for with an appropriate sized battery pack. Here is the CEO of Smith Electric talking (WARNING 1 hour audio) http://www.zshare.net/audio/8530124592d04630
      • 3 Years Ago
      Oh, that's an easy one! He is counting on the sales of the Renault Fluence ZE by Better Place. Better Place has already reserved close to 90,000 cars, and that's less than 3 months before the network starts up. Denmark has a tax system whereby a petrol car has a 180% tax and a 100% electric car has zero% tax. That makes an electric car's price of say 20,000 and a petrol car's price almost 60,000!! (56,000) Who is going to buy a petrol car in Denmark? NO ONE.. EVER.. In Israel it will be something similar as EV's have a 10% tax and petrol cars have a 72% tax. By 2014 as the network will be running in full force with battery switch stations all over Israel and Denmark the Better Place Renault Fluence ZE will be the No. 1 best selling car in Israel. http://www.globes.co.il/serveen/globes/docview.asp?did=1000684196&fid=1725 So Carlos is counting the hundreds of thousands of cars Better Place will be selling until 2016. ff
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        The market in Israel and Denmark does not amount to hundreds of thousands, and it is only those and the Australians who have expressed much interest in paying Better Place's huge charges. Its a big order for Israel, yes, but the really big market for Renault is in Europe where the price is competitive with diesel and the battery lease charges are far lower than via Better Place.
      Sukairain
      • 3 Years Ago
      We lost Steve Jobs, but we still got Carlos Ghosn. : )
      Smith Jim
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wish Mr. Ghosn much success. I hope he's right. With Nissan promising future PHEVs and GM promising future BEVs who will be first major automaker to offer HEV's, PHEVs and BEVs? The answer is Ford.
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      God Bless Ghosn and Nissan. I saw a dozen Leafs in L.A. and they look amazing. I wish I could afford one.
      DaveMart
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nissan are more specific on the fuel cell than that: 'Introduce Fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) into market' That is by 2016 http://www.nissan-global.com/EN/ENVIRONMENT/APPROACH/GREENPROGRAM/
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        I wonder what moron downrated a comment simply outlining Nissan's plans?
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DaveMart
        You got upgraded to +4. That confuses me too - I will ask a question, "Oh hey - no right or wrong answer, but will a fleet of electric school buses tax an electrical system in a small town? Just curious." And I get downgraded. Like, okay, but why? I figure people here know more about stuff than I do, so what is wrong with asking? People hold grudges...I see a -9 for Dan when he says, "The car is too heavy."
      Arun Murali
      • 3 Years Ago
      1.5 million certainly looks like a steep number with just 4 years to do it. Thats about 375k vehicles on an average every year. Even the age old Prius barely manages over 100k a year. Considering that Renault is selling their cars on leased battery model, they are likely to see more cars on the road than Nissan but the very first car Zoe is still atleast half an year away. In my belief it will be tough to even reach that 375k cars annually. On the other hand, I certainly hope they do it. 1.5 million future proof clean cars out of 800 million cars is certainly progress. Thats about 4-5 million liters of fuel saved every day.
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Arun Murali
        The Zoe is due for release in September next year. Like all such forecasts it relies heavily on sales at the back end of the forecasting period, ie after the factories are built. The currently have building for Renault/Nissan facilities to produce up to 550,000 vehicles per year, so most of the cars are to come in the last 3 years. The plan is out to 2016, and there are 5 years up to the end of that year, plus a bit. Obviously all such plans rely on demand holding up, but as for production Renault tell us that they could pretty rapidly double the 150,000 Zoe production currently planned. That was before the Flins plant was delayed though, so I don't know if that has changed things.
        skierpage
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Arun Murali
        Another part of Nissan's plan is three more EV models, so those high sales figures are the worldwide total for six or more Nissan and Renault EVs. You're spreading misinformation. Prius sales in the USA alone were 140,000 last year. Toyota doesn't seem to give worldwide sales figures, but they reached 1M in 2008-05 then passed 2M in 2010-09, suggesting a worldwide sales rate of ~400,000/year before the quake, tsunami, and Thai floods.
      Dave
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wonder what a "vehilce" is
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      See . . . I told you GM would come out with a pure electric eventually (The Spark) and Nissan would come out with a Plug-In Hybrid eventually . ICalledItColbert.gif
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        They were both being jerks for bashing the other type of drivetrain.
          lne937s
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          I don't think Nissan ever bashed plug-in hybrids. They just pointed out that they are not electric cars and were not their focus for vehicle electrification. Plug-in hybrids still aren't electric cars, regardless of what some car companies claim.
      Spiffster
      • 3 Years Ago
      Man I really love this guys passion for EVs... not a big fan of the LEAF though, but It will be very interesting to see what Nissan will follow up with. Perhaps something from Infinity that will compete with the Model S! Either way I got until 2016 before I will be back in the market for a car. My solar PV system is already sized to accommodate an EV so all I am missing is the right EV :-)
        DaveMart
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spiffster
        A Daimler badge is perhaps more likely than an Infiniti, as Nissan pursue their policy of trying to get more volume for their components including batteries by co-operation with Daimler.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spiffster
        Your local electric power company must love you . . . you are giving them free power!
        Nick
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spiffster
        You should see the Leaf in real world, it's simply amazing.
        Michael Walsh
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spiffster
        An Infiniti EV is almost certain for 2016. Sooner even. But I can't say any more than that, because it's one of those "I could tell you, but then I'd have to kill you" deals.
        Aaron Schwarz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spiffster
        More good things to come" said one of my hero's, Carlos G of Nissan! I share his vision and passion to bring electric vehicles to the mass market so that consumers can vote against imported oil that hurts their local economy. With EV battery technology rapidly advancing, in only a few more years, the battery prices will have fallen (8%) per year, whilst the power density, cycle life, calendar life and energy density will have improved (%8ish) per year = a lot of really cool more affordable EV's soon to launch, and their second and third generation Iterations will be ready for prime time. Lots of interesting things yet to come with new battery chemistry, kinetic energy recovery systems, turbo hybrids, ultracapacitors, nano materials, composites, power electronics, ect. Cool: I only wish the Nikola Tesla was here with us to see all the good technology that is being developed for the future of oil free transportation.
      David Ringgold Lardn
      • 3 Years Ago
      Spell check title, please.
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