Chinese automaker BYD is set to open its North American headquarters in Los Angeles today. The company says that the office will add around 150 jobs to the area, including engineering and management positions. In addition, the manufacturer has announced a partnership with Hertz that will see BYD electric shuttles transport rental car customers to and from their vehicles at the Los Angeles International Airport. BYD is hoping to position itself as an EV specialist here in the States, but Edmunds Auto Observer reports that the automaker has seen its fair share of problems over the past year.

In 2010, BYD sold 519,800 vehicles, which is a far cry from the 800,000 units the company forecast earlier in the year. Likewise, 2011 hasn't been any kinder to the automaker, with 232,400 vehicles sold from January through July. In addition, labor, research and administrative costs have all increased as the company's profits have slid off among weak consumer confidence.

Currently BYD plans to offer two vehicles in the U.S. – an all-electric sedan and the E6 SUV EV.


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  • 67 Comments
      Diz
      • 3 Years Ago
      We should demand US "partnerships" & agreement to transfer all technologies to their US partners. Just like China does. In everything.
        Bruce Lee
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Diz
        Where are you going to find US partners who want to learn from BYD exactly? Their assembly plants use more manual labor than robots because human labor is cheaper, that's not really technology that's applicable to use here. And there are no U.S. lithium ion battery manufacturers except A123 and they moved their new plant to China anyway.
      hmmwv
      • 3 Years Ago
      Regardless whether people will buy or even like their cars, 150 jobs is a positive thing for America. BYD should use their North American operation as an engineering center instead of a sales office, because we have the most experienced auto manufacturing talent pool in the world.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hmmwv
        [blocked]
      IBx27
      • 3 Years Ago
      People walking by should spit on their doors.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        October Calls
        • 3 Years Ago
        Ladies and gents, we have a full fledged racist here. Who the hell still uses "jap"? Seriously. You probably never even fought in WWII. Someone ban this moron.
        Quen47
        • 3 Years Ago
        America-only fanboys aren't any better
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Quen47
          [blocked]
      xmailboxcancerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      Don't trust it. Yes, because it's still Chinese, North American headquarters or not. Sorry.
      Andre Neves
      • 3 Years Ago
      No thanks. Go back where you came from.
        aatbloke1967
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        Perhaps China should adopt the same attitude towards Ford and GM? If you truly want a subsistence economy as opposed to a global industrial one, then you have to be prepared to accept all it entails.
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Ibx ... rules? Whose rules exactly? China sets its trade policies which benefits its own interests. Just as all countries do.
          IBx27
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Except the reds don't play by the rules the rest of the world follows, so up theirs.
          C4RBON
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          No, there are international agreements in place to promote fair trade and balanced, strong economies. China has a way with skirting said rules via currency manipulation and environmental disregard. China is absolutely acting in their favor. I wouldn't be complaining if their were no rules and every country did what was best for themselves. I think the US would be in a better relative position today, but the environment and global well-being would suffer. Either everyone follows the rules, or nobody does. Those are the only fair games to play.
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          Interesting, given that America emits more than a quarter of the worlds greenhouse gasses.
          aatbloke1967
          • 3 Years Ago
          @aatbloke1967
          And didn't the US refuse to ratify the Kyoto accord for the simple reason that "it was not in America's interests" in the words of G W Bush? That caused outrage in other western countries, but the US didn't give a toss.
        Andre Neves
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        Amazes me that amount of politically correct babies on this blog. I'd like to see how fast your tone changes years from now when you lose your job because the company you work for decides to move oversees. What China is doing is worldwide economic terrorism.
          Lachmund
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Andre Neves
          your kind of capitalism is the real thread today, but you probably will never get that and just blame the "damn communists"
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        [blocked]
      casenjustin19tn
      • 3 Years Ago
      I have decided when 2011 started i would find items made in the America or anywhere but China.. i was surprised how successful ive been!!!
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        October Calls
        • 3 Years Ago
        You really have no life, huh? Go do something productive like cash in your unemployment check.
        • 3 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        Al Terego
        • 3 Years Ago
        Capitalism sucks when you're not driving the engine train, huh? Well, this is what it's like for most non-Americans. Live with it and deal with it until you pay back sugar daddy China.
      C4RBON
      • 3 Years Ago
      Not interested. I vote with my wallet.
      Egon
      • 3 Years Ago
      A few years ago, BYD rolled out a few examples of their (supposedly) finest work at NAIAS. The bodywork was atrocious. Huge panel gaps and wavy door skins. I've seen better work out of vocational school auto body classes. The interiors were no better with cheap materials everywhere and lousy fit and finish. Perhaps they have improved their products since then, but that first impression was hilariously bad.
        Egon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Egon
        Okay: It ain't so. See? That wasn't so hard. There are plenty of economical cars that still maintain some level of modern quality control. The BYD examples I referenced above appeared to be inspired by mid-80s Hyundais (remember those?).
        Dest
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Egon
        Lousy fit and finish on economical cars? Say it ain't so!
          IBx27
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dest
          There isn't a single economy car built today that has panel gaps and body panel quality from the '70s. Over in the prc though, yeah you'll find that. That's a sign that the car is an accordion.
      drewpy
      • 3 Years Ago
      even if i don't like it or buy it...i'm down for more options...
      aatbloke1967
      • 3 Years Ago
      The Chinese are on a huge learning curve. By offering two distinct EV only models which are likely to be keenly priced, they're targeting a rapidly growing corner of the market ... a market in which people want as much as they can get for as little outlay as possible. The people employed by its US subsidiary company know this, and it'll bs interesting to see how they fair. If they can quickly match at least Korean quality standards, they will undoubtedly cause a few sleepless nights for the establishment. I say bring it on.
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