Kowloon  Motor Bus

The government of Hong Kong is ready to invest $180 million to acquire 36 single-decker buses, but ordinary coaches won't cut it. Ordinary emissions buses, that is.

Concerns over roadside pollution have convinced government officials in Hong Kong to purchase eight low-emissions "supercapacitor" and 28 electric buses to trial throughout the city-state. If these 36 buses prove capable of surviving the daily grind, then Hong Kong will come up with additional funds to secure more of the low-emissions coaches.

According to China Daily, Kowloon Motor Bus (pictured) is in line to get the eight "super-capacitor" buses that recharge at each stop, while the 28 electric buses will be divided among Hong Kong's four franchise bus operators. And in case you were wondering, $180 million for 36 buses means each one will set Hong Kong back $5 million.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 11 Comments
      Joeviocoe
      • 3 Years Ago
      "And in case you were wondering, $180 million for 36 buses means each one will set Hong Kong back $5 million." -Eric "The Instigator" Loveday OR, you could NOT be such a simpleton! You could realize that you cannot simply divide the total cost of this project by the number of final products produced. This is a Research grant which will test the viability of super capacitors in the real world. You could understand that the REAL "product" is research! If you were as simple as Eric is, then you would have been mad as hell at NASA for spending billions of dollars for Just 3 guys on the moon. But the next 3 guys didn't cost as much... Oh, and now we have GPS! $180 million could still be a waste of money, but for different reasons than "for 36 buses".
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Joeviocoe
        I don't think that that fact was lost on eric -- its simple, just as when you buy a fancy bike or a new mac, you're funding research. But I completely agree, it is extremely important to realize that spending money here builds demands and powers research.
          Joeviocoe
          • 3 Years Ago
          It is not only the fact that any purchase has a part that feeds R&D... but this was explicitly stated in the source link... and explicitly ignored by Eric to fuel his 'ad-revenue' blog debates. " in order to assess their performance on different conditions." http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/hkedition/2011-10/13/content_13883218.htm
      Ford Future
      • 3 Years Ago
      Isn't it great for the Tea-Republican-Party to TRANSFER LEADERSHIP to a foreign Country!
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've been to Hong Kong and I can tell you, all those buses running the routes clogged up my nose really quickly! It's wonderful to see that the government has considered the environmental impact of mass transportation. It also improves the living conditions by reducing high emission vehicles on the road which affect pedestrian traffic (which is very high in bustling Hong Kong). Juan Miguel Ruiz (Going Green) http://www.GreenJoyment.com
      • 3 Years Ago
      Thanks for helping us out with the math, however I think it may be important to clarify that its $180 mil Hong Kong Dollars and not US Dollars. The cost actually comes out to $23 mil. USD and $640,000 per bus, a much more reasonable figure.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      and I wonder what the super cap busses are. super caps have very low energy density. it would only be able to go a few km per charge but I guess that's enough in a city where you charge at every stop
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      rather expensive bus
        Andrew Richard Rose
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Yes it is rather , when you think that 100KWH of lithium batteries can be bought by the man in the street for $50k !
      • 2 Years Ago
      Eric Loveday... - as per AtomicQuasar - I'm surprised that, given you went to the trouble of doing at least some research to write this article, and that a substantial proportion consists of your opinions of the costs involved, you neglected to figure out that the costs given in the source are in HK$ not US$. As noted by AQ, this works out at about US$640,000 per bus - still expensive, but in the ballpark for an experimental trial of new technology. HK has very significant air-pollution problems, which significantly reduce quality-of-life metrics. See http://www.hongkongcan.org/eng/ for more info on HK air pollution issues. Is there an editor at AutoBlogGreen? Please have a quiet word with Eric.