How does one make the decision to put $2,250 down and then pay $499 a month for a 24-month lease of an all-electric BMW? Autoblog's Damon Lavrinc is currently working out his personal answer to this exact question about the 2012 BMW ActiveE and recently got the chance to test out the all-electric 1 Series in the streets around Munich. Anyone considering making the leap to this particular luxury EV should find the story compelling – or anyone who is just curious to learn more about the ActiveE – should get the details of Lavrinc's quest in this First Drive report.

Autoblog accepts vehicle loans from auto manufacturers with a tank of gas and sometimes insurance for the purpose of evaluation and editorial content. Like most of the auto news industry, we also sometimes accept travel, lodging and event access for vehicle drive and news coverage opportunities. Our opinions and criticism remain our own – we do not accept sponsored editorial.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 6 Comments
      PR
      • 3 Years Ago
      How does one make the decision to put $2,250 down and then pay $499 a month for a 24-month lease of an all-electric BMW? Probably like one makes a decision to put $2,500 down and then pay $439 a month for a 36-month lease of a BMW 135i. Except when leasing an EV, you calculate in state incentives, and how much your personal savings will be for buying electricity instead of gas. My personal savings would be roughly $200 a month, plus a roughly $2,000-$2,500 state incentive (yours WILL vary). So my actual cost for an ActiveEV lease would be right around $199 a month for me personally. Seems like a pretty easy decision. If BMW actually include my state, I'd be signing up in a heartbeat.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      1800+kg is pathetic. it's heavier and slower than a Leaf.
        PR
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Yup. It also has fewer doors and is less practical than the Leaf. BMW will seriously have to resolve the weight issue by designing a ground-up purpose-built EV like Nissan did, instead of doing a conversion of a gasser. Hopefully the i3 will deliver on those things. I'd still get one if I could.
        Roy_H
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        That's why this is a limited test series. The production version will be 270kg lighter.
        Andrew Richard Rose
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        what I don't understand is how is it that home converters can gut an ICE car , stuff it full of Lithium batteries and the rest of the electric kit and still come in within 10% of the weight of the original car . Something the large motor manufacturers seem incapable of !
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