Automotive News reports that domestic automakers are gaining market share thanks in part to the weak dollar. Import vehicles are currently selling at the highest price premium in 12 years compared to their domestic counterparts.

Whereas imports sold for an average of $31,636 in August, domestic vehicles left the lot for an average of $23,922. That's a difference of over $7,000, and the largest gap since 1999. That fact has helped Chrysler, Ford and General Motors pick up some market share. In addition, the earthquake and tsunami activity in Japan earlier this year resulted in tight supply of some Japanese vehicles, further pushing buyers into the waiting arms of domestic automakers.

The report says that total domestic light-vehicle deliveries increased by 10 percent from this time last year. That pushed GM to gain a full point of market share and Ford to pull an extra tenth of a percentage point.


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  • 55 Comments
      BASIQ
      • 3 Years Ago
      A nice bit of irrelevant statistics given that Japan didn't ship nearly as many cars as they usually do. Also, does this mean importers are selling more cars that actually make a profit vs the cheap ones that don't?
      stickshiftn6901
      • 3 Years Ago
      do the math .... $22k msrp for base impala or $30 k msrp for a cheap-ass camry or garbage auto tranny accord... what would you rather pay ?
        Bscar
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stickshiftn6901
        They live off their reputation for reliability, and thus, customers are willing to spend more for them. However, with that big of a gap, and more people living on lower income, 8k is a HUGE difference($50 or more a month extra if you're financing). So some might be willing to take the gamble and go with the lower priced vehicle. Hell, even if you had to replace the whole engine, you'd break even on the price gap.
      cashsixeight
      • 3 Years Ago
      I love german cars, but they're stupidly priced lately for anything interesting. Japanese cars are pretty much 100% bloated and boring now, with the exception of the Genesis Coupe R Spec. This leaves the domestics, which have sucked ass since I was born in 1980. And I have to tell you... Chrysler is really on my radar. Their new V6 with 280hp and 30+ mpg... nice interiors... definitely cool cars! And ford's mustang with the V6, 300hp, and 30mpg! Insane! Go detroit! And SUCK IT GM! YOU STILL SUCK.
        L14t
        • 3 Years Ago
        @cashsixeight
        Is that why Camaros have more power, because they suck. And I like how you say go Detroit but then bash GM
          • 3 Years Ago
          @L14t
          [blocked]
        rmkensington
        • 3 Years Ago
        @cashsixeight
        Awwww yeah Boy!
      • 3 Years Ago
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          Synthono
          • 3 Years Ago
          donnie: VW is a publically traded company with large divisions on every continent. The money goes everywhere.
        • 3 Years Ago
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        MiralDesai
        • 3 Years Ago
        What kind of sense is that? Are people seriously buying cars based on the fact they want to be patriotic and American? I bet a lot of people think like this too.. How about buying a car that is value for money? Or built with good quality that will last? Who bloody cares what country it came from/was built in. A good car is a good car.
          Camaroman101
          • 3 Years Ago
          @MiralDesai
          tell that to all the asians who buy toyotas and hondas for life purely because of the badge
        Patrick R. Gibbons
        • 3 Years Ago
        oh yes, because its oh so American to tell free people what to buy and enjoy in life... the most American thing you can do is buy whatever car, truck, SUV or motorcycle you want from whoever you want. Its called freedom - enjoy it while you still have it!
      • 3 Years Ago
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        clquake
        • 3 Years Ago
        And guess who owns Ford? Mostly Chinese people. ???????????????????????????????????????????
      BipDBo
      • 3 Years Ago
      In the 90s, if you were looking for a big SUV with all the trim, you would shop American. Not many people looking for a compact went to an American lot. Now that's changing because American compacts are getting better.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
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      • 3 Years Ago
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        • 3 Years Ago
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        • 3 Years Ago
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          Rayvan
          • 3 Years Ago
          Because like most people, you seem to think screwing the car together here = "made" here. The cars that are screwed together here get many of their sub-assemblies from Japan.
          • 3 Years Ago
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      tipdrip215
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well luckily for us, the quality of American cars has risen by leaps and bounds since the 1980's, and soon enough if things continue the way they are now, American quality will be better than the Japanese.
        Renaurd
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tipdrip215
        American quality is already better than Japan.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
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          Dest
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          lol...
        • 3 Years Ago
        @tipdrip215
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          Synthono
          • 3 Years Ago
          While it's tempting to downvote this guy because of his reputation for saying very stupid things, this is actually accurate. Case in point: The Chevrolet Colorado saw production decrease immediately after the Japanese earthquake because paint and important transmission components were sourced from Japan.
      Jason L.
      • 3 Years Ago
      ... the Genesis is Korean, not Japanese. All rook same, I guess
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jason L.
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        • 3 Years Ago
        @Jason L.
        Herro?Why u people downgrade so much?It true.We asian people are feering the same way towards you.You all rook same to us.
      AnthonyL
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hmm.. I have some questions about this article. It says "foreign-built" and "domestic" but then it talks about auto makers in specific. Now is say a VW Passat or Toyota Tundra "foreign-built" and are all of the big 3's offerings considered domestic even if they use cheaper labor in Asia?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AnthonyL
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          AnthonyL
          • 3 Years Ago
          Well then this article is misleading then. It states this is the reason for the big 3 picking up market share. How so? Many foreign housed automakers have moved production plants to the US (BMW, VW, Toyota) and have been able to produce for cheaper (due to buying materials and labor in dollars rather than Euros, Yen, etc). This leaves "foreign-built" cars to be more expensive in comparison (everything is relative). Big 3 makers have been also out sourcing from the states to build cars cheaper. The article mixes "foerign-built" and foreign company together when it shouldn't be. As you snarkly put it in your last sentence, how is this complicated? I don't know, ask the author who confused the two.
          Dump
          • 3 Years Ago
          I agree with AnthonyL. The article does not clearly define the differences b/t foreign- & domestic-built vehicles as related to all the major automakers. The articles also makes a note about the market share for the US Big3, where most of us know they sell both domestic & import vehicles as well. Very open-ended.
          • 3 Years Ago
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          Fresh
          • 3 Years Ago
          Since the big 3 are still by far the largest producers in this country it's not hard to see why you could infer that an increase in sales of "domestic built vehicles" would be a larger benefit to "domestic companies".
      sp33dklz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Considering there aren't many domestic cars in the upper eschelon of pricing, that gap doesn't make a whole lot of sense to me. I think the information is irrelevant... sort of. Regardless of whether there's a disparity in pricing, I think the amount of units being sold is a far better indication of success. The move away from SUV's could be one of the reasons that domestic vehicles are selling for a lower average price.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @sp33dklz
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        Danaon
        • 3 Years Ago
        @sp33dklz
        That's an overly simplistic way to look at it. GM has the highest average transaction price of any mainstream automaker. I assume that luxury brands like BMW, Audi, and Mercedes skew this a bit.
          Bruce Lee
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Danaon
          I'm not sure this article is counting trucks like the average transaction price stats usually do, or else you would have higher numbers for the domestics. I'm pretty sure it's strictly comparing cars that are imported versus produced domestically and the numbers are obviously higher for imports since many imports are solely luxury marques.
      Patrick R. Gibbons
      • 3 Years Ago
      and it has nothing to do with US auto manufacturers producing cars more efficiently. The price is directly correlated to a weak dollar, import restricts (We restrict the supply of what must be sold, low supply and high demand increases the price) and we also have an additional import tax on the cars (which further boosts the price consumers pay). In other words, US auto manufacturers have to cheat in order to get their cars to appear cheaper. In reality, all cars, including American ones, would be much cheaper if we had free trade.
        MiralDesai
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Patrick R. Gibbons
        and as a result, the USA is losing out on better cars but also at getting what are imported at a high price. Low selection of imports and high price basically. There are some top quality cars that the USA barely get, if at all. This lack of competition has created a market where American car companys rule and don't have to worry about quality as or efficiency compared to cars from other countries.
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