LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
  •  LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
  •  LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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  • LA 2010: 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV
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Repeated use of a DC Fast Charge, "Level 3" quick-charge unit negatively affects the long-term performance of the battery pack that powers most plug-in vehicles, right? Wrong, according to Mitsubishi.

Officials over at Mitsubishi believe that even daily use of a quick-charge unit won't have much overall affect on the battery pack found in the 2012 Mitsubishi i. Bryan Arnett, manager of electric vehicle product strategy at Mitsubishi Motors North America, told Green Car Reports, "We expect a daily quick charge not to have a significant toll on battery life."

According to Arnett, the automaker expects its battery packs to retain around 80 percent of their original capacity after ten years of real-world use. That 80 percent estimate reportedly includes frequent use of a quick-charge station.

Still, Mitsubishi is smart enough not to really encourage exclusive use of quick-charge stations. Rather, the automaker is implying that a once-a-day quick-charge won't hurt life or capacity much, so go ahead and quick-charge your i whenever necessary.



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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      Battery technology seam not to be masterized by these contradictory studies. The best would be to stick to proven hydrogen technologies even if the hydrogen infrastructure is in his infancy. With the confusion about battery chemistry and the large choice of different battery chargers, bevs start in a big confused way. Probably consumers will not be attracted by these problematic overpriced gadjets. All we see here is the result of subsidies toward fake petrol replacement gadjets done by big oil fans like bush and obama, epa, cia, opeq, wall street, paid scientists, pollution agencies that want to keep their jobs , journalists that want their share of the petrol-war stories, the wifes and families of petrol shareholders that still need the millions to go to vancancies and universities, Taxation govermental business like epa and doa.
        Roy_H
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        The only "proven hydrogen technologies" are way too expensive. That is why there is so much on-going research to reduce cost, increase lifespan, and reduce size of hydrogen tanks.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Roy_H
          The size of hydrogen tanks isn't so much a concern as weight. Current efforts are focused on reducing the amount of carbon fiber used (which will also reduce the weight and cost of the tank) by using newer winding techniques/patterns, smaller carbon filaments, and different resins. The carbon fiber currently makes up about 75% of a compressed hydrogen tank's cost.
      • 3 Years Ago
      The long life of the battery under fast charging is also helped in the fast-charge capable SE of a secondary cooling circuit drawing on the air-conditioning to keep the battery cool under fast charge: http://i.mitsubishicars.com/miev/charging/battery
      electronx16
      • 3 Years Ago
      Better read the greencarreports article to understand what Mitsubishi is really saying here: Fastcharging won't hurt your battery IF: -it's only a midday top up -that's limited by Mitsubishi to a maximum of 80% of capacity So fastcharging won't hurt your battery as long as it involves only a small portion of the battery's capacity. So unless fastchargers are everywhere the iMiEV's small batterypack will still get you nowhere.
        Tysto
        • 3 Years Ago
        @electronx16
        I suspect the importance of this, tho, is that fleet owners need not worry about using fast chargers to top off cars as they come and repeatedly thruout the day. Regular owners will still slow charge overnight, and nobody is planning on driving EVs cross-country yet.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @electronx16
        Yeah, it sure would be nice to see some increase in the Mitsubishi's battery capacity. OTOH they are leading in EV car sales to date, with about 11,000 sold worldwide, and are much more focussed on being strictly a city run-about than the Leaf, so it does fine at what it is supposed to do, and one should not expect every duckling to become a swan.
          • 3 Years Ago
          Fair enough. I hadn't bothered to check for the latest figures. Mitsubishi is ramping sales and production too, but their main expansion is not due until next April.
          Schmart Guy
          • 3 Years Ago
          Wikipedia has the i MiEV and LEAF both over 15,000 in worldwide cumulative sales up to Sept. Looks like the LEAF will soon be taking over the lead.
      krona2k
      • 3 Years Ago
      I thought it's because they switched to the new Toshiba batteries, which seem to be rock hard?!
        • 3 Years Ago
        @krona2k
        Nah, they are still using the GS Yausa for most of their cars, but are using a tiny 10.5 kwh Toshiba in some configurations as a second source. How that will pan out we will have to wait and see, but certainly there would not be fast charge issues with the Toshiba.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      They don't sound very sure of themselves. . . . ." not to have **a significant** toll on battery life." Maybe they are right. I hope so. But I don't think we have had enough real-world experience to know. Perhaps they have a lot of simulated testing (generally repeated discharging at elevated temps) . . . but all simulated testing is not quite the same as real world discharging and time-based aging.
        porosavuporo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        It's kinda hard to be absolutely sure what your battery will do in 10 years, if the particular battery chemistry itself is barely 10 years old ? I mean, you can test cycling, yes, but you cannot ever test the actual calendar life without having both the Flux capacitor and the DeLorean. And there is more than one commonly used battery chemistries that do have calendar life issues, pretty much independent of cycling duty or storage conditions.
      Roy_H
      • 3 Years Ago
      Tysto, Tesla uses Panasonic, Toyota uses Panasonic and Sanyo, GM uses LG Chem and A123, Ford uses LG Chem and A123, Hyundai uses LG Chem, Fisker uses A123, Tata Indica EV uses Electrovaya. As far as I know only Mitsubishi uses Toshiba.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Not surprising: 'Mitsubishi tested the cycle life of the pack under standard (50 A) and quick charge (120 A) conditions using the JC08 driving pattern and found that the pack retained 84% of capacity with quick charging and 83% with standard charging after 1,000 cycles.' http://www.greencarcongress.com/2008/05/the-battery-pac.html That's the GS Yausa pack. The Toshiba lithium titanate one used as an alternate is so macho it laughs in the face of fast charging, and cries: 'You can THAT fast! Come on, give me your best charge!'
        Roy_H
        • 3 Years Ago
        This is precisely why the article has made a major error! "Repeated use of a DC Fast Charge, "Level 3" quick-charge unit negatively affects the long-term performance of the battery pack that powers most plug-in vehicles, right? Wrong, according to Mitsubishi." The article suggests that ALL battery technologies are the same, and that other battery manufacturers who state that their batteries will be damaged by repeated quick charge are stupid and don't know what they are talking about.
          Tysto
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Roy_H
          "The article suggest that ALL battery technologies are the same..." No it doesn't. It specifies "the battery pack that powers most plug-in vehicles." That suggests that if a manufacture is using the GS Yausa pack like Mitsubishi and says that fast charging will damage it, then they are doing something wrong with their charge controller or are being overly timid.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Roy_H
          That's Eric! ;-)
      EZEE
      • 3 Years Ago
      Radical Right Wing Extremist here... These articles scare me. First, we hear, to extend your battery life, do NOT: Fully charge your battery (thee goes my 90 mile range). Fully drain your battery (see above) And now, MAYBE it won't hurt if you charge it every day??? Why not just leave the damn thing in my driveway so I can point at it to prove how much I care while driving my ICE car around? These articles are not helping...
      Arun Murali
      • 3 Years Ago
      Right. This is because the 'i' uses Toshiba SCiB batteries as opposed to traditional Lithium ion cells. SCiB are Lithium Titanate nano crystal batteries, similar to Altairnano. These SCiB batteries are proven to be able to take over 6000 cycles(18 years if charged once a day) of quick charging and still retain over 80% charge. The 'i' does look quite competitive now. If only they had it on a bigger car like the Colt more people might be interested in it.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      A 30 minute recharge ( 2C rate ) is nothing for a battery with a charge rating of 5C+. The limitation is more so the power grid at that point!. Batteries that can do >2C rate charges have existed for a pretty long time. Mitsubishi is smart for going in this direction.. It's nice to be able to beat on the battery all day and not worry about it. since it's overspecced like crazy.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        The Toshibas are perfectly happy at 10C!
      hodad66
      • 3 Years Ago
      first, you have to find a "fast" charger....... perhaps when my Volt lease is up in three years........
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @hodad66
        Well the iMiEV has such a small battery that you might want to have a fast charger around before considering buying it. :-/
      Roy_H
      • 3 Years Ago
      Forgot to add, Nissan makes their own batteries.
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