Toyota is considering moving production of the company's Korean-market Camry to the United States, according to Reuters. The move would take advantage of the free trade agreement between the U.S. and South Korea and put Toyota in a better position financially as the yen continues to strengthen.

The Korean-market Camry would be built alongside the U.S.-spec Camry in the automaker's Georgetown, Kentucky facility. Even with word that Toyota is mulling sending production outside of Japan, the company has said that it is still committed to keeping some manufacturing at home.

The Toyota Camry has enjoyed substantial success in South Korea, where it remains one of the most popular foreign-built vehicles in the country. Last year, Toyota sold around 4,200 Camry models in the South Korea. That represents a small figure compared to the 203,688 units produced at the Georgetown plant last year, but shifting production to the States could still pay large dividends for Toyota.


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  • 37 Comments
      Danny Eckel
      • 3 Years Ago
      Actually the guy everyone down rated has a valid point. If you go back and look at what automakers were selling in very early by the numbers, it was a WHOLE lot more than what they currently do. Don't be fooled by the green percentage increases as compared to an abysmal sales year, they sell a lot less than what they did in the glory days and Im guessing must have additional manufacturing potential
      Myself
      • 3 Years Ago
      Speaking of cheap labor....
      • 3 Years Ago
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        • 3 Years Ago
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        axiomatik
        • 3 Years Ago
        The sensible reader would simply shrug. 4,200 cars per year isn't really going to make any difference either way.
        • 3 Years Ago
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      dondonel
      • 3 Years Ago
      Toyota sells so little in US these days that they plenty of production capacity to spare. No wonder, considering their current offer.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @dondonel
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      DuBirus
      • 3 Years Ago
      The actual true American,born outside of the U.S.! While GM and Ford mull on expansion in Korea and send parts production there Toyota and Honda are doing the opposite. That what I call pseudo-American companies, take advantage of being founded in the U.S., but hedging domestic production and using money toexpand outside the borders and bring to the country under American emblem..plz you guys are bunch of joke Big2!!!
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DuBirus
        [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DuBirus
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          kontroll
          • 3 Years Ago
          you're the biggest uneducated peasant on this blog and you have the bolls to criticise others? I think blogging is to the detriment of common sense and intelligence. It was way better before blogging, at least the idiots remained in the closet and nobody knew about them
        • 3 Years Ago
        @DuBirus
        [blocked]
      Polly Prissy Pants
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'll definitely support a company working to create manufacturing jobs in America versus one that gives it's exec an 8 figure "bonus" while firing thousands of middle class workers. Which company is really better for America?
      gvari
      • 3 Years Ago
      WoW! I guess the day has come. Cheap uneducated American labor for the well off Koreans? Keep rapping gringos.
      reattadudes
      • 3 Years Ago
      the Toyota Camry has enjoyed substantial success in South Korea, where it remains one of the most popular foreign-built vehicles in the country". they sold 4,200 cars in a country of FORTY-EIGHT MILLION. and that is considered "substantial success". of course, when the US has had dismal failures selling cars in Japan, the Japan fanboys tell us, "it's because US products are junk, and the Japanese don't want them". ...and what spin can you put on this?
        brian
        • 3 Years Ago
        @reattadudes
        Koreans have an issue with buying foreign cars - Particularly Japanese cars... ...something about atrocities during WWII.
          miles
          • 3 Years Ago
          @brian
          Wasn't that about 70 years ago? It's nationalism, pure & simple. I've also heard anecdotal evidence about harassment for driving foreign brands (lots of traffic tickets). They support the home team, because it makes their country stronger. Many of us in the US don't, and it makes our country weaker.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @brian
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        Temple
        • 3 Years Ago
        @reattadudes
        Hyundai/Kia has mind-boggling 80% market share in S. Korea. 80% for basically one line of cars. The rest are largely taken up by the lesser foreign-owned Korean-brands like Daewoo, Ssangyong, Samsung, etc.
        RA
        • 3 Years Ago
        @reattadudes
        people don't drive foreign cars in korea.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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      whofan
      • 3 Years Ago
      America has been good to Toyota, It wouldn`t hurt them to built more vehicles here.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @whofan
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      TruthHertz
      • 3 Years Ago
      That's one way to get the Koreans to buy an American built car. Make sure it's under a Japanese name plate.
        billfrombuckhead
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TruthHertz
        Don't count your chickens before they hatch. Let's see how many Camrys sell before talking about Koreans buying American assembled Japanese appliances. The refreshed Camry is going to have to compete with the new improved Korean built Malibu over there as well as other improved Korean built cars. Hyundai had to withdraw from Japan as Japanese wouldn't buy Korean cars. I'm sure Korean Government Motors will have some response.
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