Word from the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show was that dividing lines would form in the Hyundai-Kia Automotive Group, with Kia to focus solely on electric vehicles and Hyundai to develop plug-in hybrid and fuel cell vehicles.

Under this strategy, Kia will soon kick off small-scale production of the group's first highway-capable electric vehicle under the codename "TAM." The vehicle – scheduled to launch in late 2011 – is reportedly based on the Hyundai i10 minicar. Specs? We'd expect the electrified Kia to sport a 16-kWh lithium-ion battery, a 49-kW (66 horsepower) electric motor and be a sub-100-mile electric mini.

The Kia-badged i10 electric will likely differ only slightly from the Hyundai i10 BlueOn prototype that took to the streets of South Korea in limited numbers back in September 2010. According to Kia, the electrified version of the i10 will be a low-volume production model, with output set at 2,000 units in 2012. There's no word on whether or not Kia's electric minicar will ever hit the U.S.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 9 Comments
      Michael Walsh
      • 3 Years Ago
      Test
      • 3 Years Ago
      I remember a CARB credit system, that "extra allowance is also available for battery electric vehicles with more than a 100-mile range per charge." I truly hope Kia TAM uses the relatively small battery to level out its price compared to equivalent combustion engine cars. Kia is mostly known for affordable cars and it could be one reason for this. Another is that the minicar is kept to a certain weight boundaries to increase efficiency or match some jurisdictions with limits on weight.
      fairfireman21
      • 3 Years Ago
      Would not buy one with someone elses money.
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      16KWH? The only people that can get away with a battery that small would be Aptera and other hyper-efficient cars. Other than them, 16KWH is too small, IMHO. (That includes you, Toshiba iMiEV.)
      Michael Walsh
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm kinda sad about this one. I don't think the i10 is a particularly attractive car, and thought they'd have something better looking as their first production EV.....an electrified Forte, for example. But still, one more EV on the market is better than one less!
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Let us know if there are plans to get it here Eric.. We really need a small & affordable electric car here in the states. Said car needs to come in at the price of a Prius or below. I think Hyundai could actually pull it off.
      EVSUPERHERO
      • 3 Years Ago
      2000 units is not mass production, so no effort being made here to bring production price down.
      Michael Walsh
      • 3 Years Ago
      Kinda sad that it's going to be something this bland and not, say, an electrified Forte. But still, one more EV in the marketplace is better than one less! Maybe we won't get the i10 Stateside, and will instead get something more interesting. We can but hope! BTW, ABG, I haven't been able to use my FB login to post here or rate others' posts since Saturday! Banned for playful (yet admittedly juvenile) fun with the spammers? Surely not?
      Michael Walsh
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well, I'm somewhat disappointed...I don't find the i10 particularly enticing. I was rather hoping their first EV would be something a little better...like maybe an electrified Forte.
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