AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors
  • AltCar 2011: Island Green Motors

How's this for an unusual business model: take a Chinese-built vehicle, convert it to electric drive in Iowa and then export it to the Caribbean. Yeah, it doesn't make all that much sense to us, either.

Perhaps this is why Island Green Motors (IGM) scrapped this original plan and is now focused on building and selling electric scooters. At the 2011 AltCar Expo in Santa Monica this weekend, IGM was showcasing both its three-door E-SUV and its E-scooter. Neither of these are for sale quite yet (and the Jonway-based E-SUV, while originally intended for the islands, will most likely be too expensive for the Caribbean market, IGM's Dean Tassio admitted to AutoblogGreen), but IGM could put the E-scooter into production in the spring of 2012. It's also far too early to talk about prices, but the two versions of the E-scooter – one that has a 72-volt LiFP battery and a 5-kW, brushless DC hub motor and one that has a 48-volt, 3-kW system – could cost around $7,500 and $5,000, respectively. Maybe.

What would you get for that money? A range of around 54 (or 40, for the lesser bike) miles and a top speed of 54 (40) miles per hour. Both bikes can charge in around 5-6 hours from a standard 110 outlet. The design of the bike was done by Momo in Italy, which created a good-looking two-wheeler that weighs only around 400 pounds.

The E-SUV, should it ever make it to market, would be offered in both three- and five-door versions. Both would be able to go around 60 miles on a charge and have a top speed of 75 mph. The bigger SUV would come packing a 21.7-kWh pack, while the little one would rock a 17.4-kWh battery. That sound you hear? It's the waves splashing in this island fantasy.


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