In its latest 30-second advertisement pitching the 2012 LaCrosse eAssist, Buick makes an interesting point: since people don't constantly run in place, its near-luxury mid-size sedan doesn't either.

The ad thus extolls the virtues of eAssist, a fuel-saving mild hybrid setup with stop-start technology available in the LaCrosse. Because of Buick's simple – but, indeed, quite clever spot – the general buying public should comprehend eAssist: it shuts down the 2012 LaCrosse's gas-burning 2.4-liter Ecotec engine when not in motion.

Thanks to eAssist technology, the $30,820 2012 LaCrosse, which is indeed quite a porker (3,829 to 4,045 pounds), returns 25 miles per gallon in the city and a rather impressive 36 mpg highway. Buick says eAssist, is a "technology that shifts from gas to electric power, and back, seamlessly." And that's all Buick is trying to say, and you can check it out for yourself after the jump.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 26 Comments
      Dave
      • 3 Years Ago
      2011 Lacrosse 23 mpg combined, $27,130 2012 Lacrosse 29 mpg combined, $29,960 $2,830 to save ~$375 per year (plus a longer cruising distance and 15 more hp off the line) sounds like something that even conservative Buick buyers can appreciate.
        Mark Schaffer
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dave
        Are all other features EXACTLY the same including acc.? Because if they aren't then the price difference is actually some portion of your figure.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dave
        Also, does the EPA drive cycle give start/stop a fair shake as to how much you will be saving in gas for real world drving?
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      Start-Stop is the easy, low-cost way of saving tons of oil. Just look at any big metro area, on any given day, there's MILLIONS of cars just idling and burning untold amounts of fuel for nothing.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Yes- Gay.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      no plug no green
        Bootkicker
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        so gay
        GR
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Rome wasn't built in a day, Dan. Neither will we switch to all electric all at once.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Dan, is this a record for you? Four words and -18? Not sure I could do this if I tried? If I voted, you would be -17 but the record must go on.
        Jon
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        no grammar no sense
        uncle_sam
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        the daly Dan rant. :D
      Jim McL
      • 3 Years Ago
      Very nicely done. Reminds me of the Renault / Nissan ads where everything ran on gas. I suppose the BBC and the Top Gear guys will find some way to denigrate it. Consumer Reports will too. But we need every angle, and this is a good one. I wouldn't buy one but I applaud GM anyway.
      miles
      • 3 Years Ago
      Very nice spot, well done.
      Smith Jim
      • 3 Years Ago
      I support all efforts to increase efficiency but I noticed something funny about this advertisement. This advert attempts to educate consumers about start-stop advantages in CITY driving but then they boast about the highway MPG number. Did anyone else catch that?
        krisztiant
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Smith Jim
        eAssist is not a pure start-stop system, but a mild-hybrid, coupled with GM’s next-gen six-speed automatic, reducing friction losses etc. Since the electric boost takes the place of some downshifts, it needs less hunting for gears / able to hold a higher gear in steady-state situations / able to use a lower final-drive ratio of 2.64:1 vs. 3.23:1 (2011 four-cylinder), resulting higher highway mpg as well. The ad, first of all, attempts to educate Buick's specific target market, who might not know, care (or be able to catch on) how this tech actually works, but these funny real-world associations will help them to dig it.
          Smith Jim
          • 1 Day Ago
          @krisztiant
          Good point. I appreciate it when I learn stuff from people who comment here. Thanks for educating me. Where did you get this technical information about the final drive ratio, etc?
          krisztiant
          • 1 Day Ago
          @krisztiant
          @Smith Jim Here's GM's Media site with detailed specifications about the 2012 LaCrosse (and all the other GM vehicles by brand). http://media.gm.com/media/us/en/buick/vehicles/lacrosse/2012.tab1.html
      winc06
      • 3 Years Ago
      Don't all hybrids use this tech and many nonhybrid small cars are getting it? I thought advertising was to let people know what is special about your product? It is like saying your hybrid has a battery. Duh.
        Dave
        • 1 Day Ago
        @winc06
        We car geeks know that, but to most of the population, its a foreign language.
      Doug
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow that's a BUICK? It looks loke a Lexus GS in profile. Pretty.
      • 1 Day Ago
      This is a great commerical. Im am going to purchase a buick with soaring gas prices,after seeing this ad.
      Champ
      • 1 Day Ago
      You know, I have a 2003 civic hybrid, and on that, the engine only kicks off when your foot is on the break, and you are going about 3-5mph or less. If you lift your foot off the break to creep forward (like in a fast food drive-through line) the engine fires back up and then, it does NOT turn back off until get the car back up to a higher speed (like 10mph) and then break again. So, that leaves me idling through the whole drive-through lane. I REALLY want a manual "drive-through" button that tells the gas engine to stay off while under - say 10mph. This would apply to creeping through very slow moving traffic as well. I sincerely hope that Buick's system is better. My neighbor has a Ford Escape Hybrid, and I've noticed that she can creep down the road at a slow speed, and then gas engine doesn't fire up until she really gets going. I think Toyota's system works better too, but it just leads me to a little frustration that engineers don't think all the way through on a start-stop system.
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Champ
        Hybrid systems have come a LONG way since 2003. Just about any hybrid will go into electric-only mode at the lowest speeds unless you stomp on the accelerator. It's nice to see start-stop making its way to the US. It's been standard in Europe in many models for years, especially in vehicles with diesel engines (which are also slow to come to the US for various reasons). Whether it's easy and low-cost is debatable, though. Starting and stopping an engine at every red light means sensing when the start-stop should be used (or not) and making the engine start up IMMEDIATELY and smoothly. There is surely technology involved, and doing it poorly would be worse than not doing it at all. So, I'm glad to see it but I wouldn't expect this feature to be seen in your sub-$20k compacts.
      Rick
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is a very practical addition netting some real-world gains. Auto makers have for a long time advertised highway mileage only when speaking of such matters. "The __ mpg 2011 Toyota Camery" for example is how the ads start out. But for a substantial car like the LaCrosse, 26 city mpg would be great.
        uncle_sam
        • 1 Day Ago
        @Rick
        I bet an experienced hypermiler can beat that. like with the honda ima most drivers got much better ratings, just with lots of coasting. the buick is based on the german insignia which is very well made. it is sad that the eAssist will not come to germany
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