Although the Arctic has incredible potential energy resources – the United States Geological Survey (USGS) estimates 90 billion barrels of undiscovered oil and 1,668 trillion cubic feet of undiscovered gas – extracting that fuel will be costly.

A calculated and cautious approach to exploitation will be vital to optimal development, according to the UK-based analytical firm Visiongain. Due to the lack of geological data in the Arctic, oil and gas exploration and extraction will be a high-risk, massive-reward venture in which only the most experienced and wealthy of companies will compete.

Visiongain predicts that global spending on advanced oil and gas exploration technologies, including those used in the Arctic, will exceed $10.17 billion in 2011 and soar to exorbitant levels by 2021. Why all this spending? Well, as the world shifts to discovering hidden oil and gas deposits, the exploration industry will be required to use advanced surveying methods and outrageously expensive equipment. This kind of energy doesn't come cheap.
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The Advanced Oil & Gas Exploration Technologies Market 2011-2021

The Advanced Oil & Gas Exploration Technologies Market 2011-2021 report analyses how this vitally important market will develop over the next ten years. The report quantifies the market in terms of global size and breaks the market down into sub-markets and seven regional markets, with forecasts and analysis provided for each market from 2011-2021. The report also examines the major drivers and restraints influencing the market over the next decade and explains the major technologies utilised, analysing which regions will drive growth for each technology. Our research shows that global spending in 2011 on advanced oil & gas exploration technologies will total $10.17bn.

Oil and gas exploration was once a painstaking, inefficient and time consuming activity. Prospectors looked for surface seepages from underground reserves, which occur only over a small proportion of deposits. Today, technological innovation allows more efficient management of fields and better evaluation of exploration prospects, reducing the need to drill numerous exploratory wells thus saving money and minimising environmental damage. A combination of high oil prices, improved extraction technologies, increasing global energy demands, and supply concerns including; declining production, depleting production fields, maturing reservoirs and increasingly more difficult frontier exploration that is deeper, more complex and more remote - is creating new opportunities for growth in the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market. As the need to find new oil and gas deposits increases, the exploration industry will be relentlessly driven toward the use of more advanced surveying methods, including seismic 2D, 3D and 4D imaging, Controlled Source Electromagnetics (CSEM) and Remote Sensing techniques.

Though the industry will be faced with the restraints of proving the effectiveness of some of the new technologies on a commercial scale, overcoming environmental concerns, and confronting a weak global economy, the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market is likely to provide substantial opportunities for potential investors. This report offers an examination of the advanced exploration technologies market over the next decade, providing detailed market forecasts for each of the regional markets and offering in-depth analysis of the opportunities and challenges facing companies in the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market throughout the world.

The report also describes the most important technological changes within the advanced oil & gas technologies industry and assesses their importance for the growth of the market over the long-term. The various drivers and restraints of the market are evaluated in order to provide readers with specific insights into the future direction of the exploration technologies market.

How much is forecast to be spent in the leading regional advanced oil & gas exploration technologies markets in 2011? Who are the leading companies in the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies industry? Where are the growth opportunities over the next decade - in which countries and with which type of technology? These critical questions and many more are definitively answered in this comprehensive report.

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• Global advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market forecasts and analysis for 2011-2021.
• 88 tables, charts and graphs quantifying, analysing and forecasting the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market from 2011-2021.
• Analysis and forecasts informed by extensive consultation with industry expert opinion. Full transcripts of interviews are included from two leading advanced oil & gas exploration technologies companies.
• Regional market forecasts from 2011-2021 and analysis for the 7 regional advanced oil & gas exploration technologies markets.
• Submarket forecasts from 2011-2021 for the 3 major advanced oil & gas exploration technologies.
• Profiles of the 32 leading companies within the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market.
• SWOT analysis of strengths, weakness, opportunities and threats facing the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market over the next ten years.
• Examination of the main technologies and contemporary innovations in the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market

Comprehensive analysis of the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market

The Advanced Oil & Gas Exploration Technologies Market 2011-2021 report examines this sector critically by drawing upon a rich combination of primary and secondary research with a comprehensive review of recent contracts, official corporate and governmental announcements, news reports, industry publications, market analysis, policy documents, industry statements and an extensive consultation of expert opinion.

Why you should buy The Advanced Oil and Gas Exploration Technologies Market 2011-2021

• You will achieve a thorough understanding of the global advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market and how it will develop over the next ten years.
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• The analysis and forecasting has been underpinned by extensive consultation with expert opinion. Within the report, you will read full transcripts of original and exclusive interviews with CEOs of two leading advanced oil & gas exploration technologies companies:
- Dmitry Vilbaum CEO of Terra Energy & Resource Technologies, Inc.
- Martin Bett CEO of Stingray Geophysical Limited
• You will receive regional market forecasts from 2011-2021 for advanced oil & gas technologies markets in the following regions:
- Asia-Pacific
- Latin America
- North America
- Europe
- Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS)
- Africa
- The Middle East
• You will receive submarket forecasts from 2011-2021 for the following global advanced oil & gas technologies submarkets:
- Seismic Exploration Technologies Market
- Controlled-Source Electromagnetics (CSEM) Exploration Technologies Market
- Remote Sensing Exploration Technologies Market
• You will be able to compare the various global advanced oil & gas technologies and discover which technologies will grow most rapidly in each region over the forecast period.
• You will be provided with profiles of 32 of the leading companies within the global advanced oil & gas ttechnologies market.
• You will receive a SWOT analysis of the main strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the global aadvanced oil & gas ttechnologies market over the next ten years.

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Anybody with an interest in the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market should gain valuable information and insight from this new study by visiongain, which analyses one of the most dynamic markets in the oil & gas industry. The advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market offers substantial business and investment opportunities and is a critical component of the global energy sector.

This visiongain energy report will be valuable both to those already involved in the advanced oil & gas exploration technologies market and those wishing to enter the market in the future. Gain an understanding of how to tap into the potential of this market by ordering The Advanced Oil & Gas Exploration Technologies Market 2011-2021 report today.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 43 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      "What's your definition of cheap, because it's pretty much cheaper than the alternatives." I think that we are in the middle of a major sea change - that is testing your hypotheses now. My money is on alternatives dropping in price and being cheaper than traditional fossil fuels in the very near future. The numbers are very hard to pin down. What is the true cost of a gallon of gas? It becomes especialy complex when you factor in the subsidies, and the taxes. I think we are at an amazing moment in time - and are witnessing the emergence of the new energy economy. I think fossils will be irrlelevant within a couple of decades. Time will tell. David
        Smith Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        I hope you're right David but the concept of Jevon's paradox scares the bejesus out of me.
      Noz
      • 3 Years Ago
      I wonder what 10.7 Billion in renewable energy research would have gotten us.....
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Noz
        Again, I must comment that gasoline is but a small component of the total output from this sort of exploration. Our society needs petrochemicals for a whole host of industries, from agriculture to plastics to pharmaceuticals.
      Ryan
      • 3 Years Ago
      I hope they realize the artic isn't clear skies and calm blue water... Are they only going to be able to drill for 2 or 3 months out of the year each summer? And how is this and keeping the status quo any better than changing to new tech? Or is it because the auto makers and ship builders aren't making good cars that don't use oil? I just hope we don't fight a war over this 'oil' up there.
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ryan
        @Ryan You are correct that it's disgraceful that shipping companies continue to use bunker oil because its cheap. The IMO regulations are pathetic. Marine grade No. 6 oil should be abolished. Sit down some time, and make a list of all the products Oil provides, then cross out all the products that could reasonably be replaced with alternate sources, you are still left with more demand than the Oil industry can provide from current production. The next dynamic you must calculate, is the investment in western economies provided by the wealth generated by the Oil industry. Now you can start to appreciate the scale of devastation to the world economy if the Oil industry faltered, or was unable to produce an economically viable product . Everyone, including the Oil industry, is aware of Oil depletion. The problem is, that despite enormous investment, only a very small percentage of alternate energy has been developed.(except for Nuclear, mostly uneconomic). The world still relies on Coal. But, if Oil depletion gets as bad as the doomsday prophets claim, get ready to fight wars over this resource. Kuwait, Iraq (partly) Libya (completely), are all resource wars. Western economies run on Oil! When it becomes a matter of seeing our people starve, or fighting, we always choose war! The best hope for peace and prosperity lies with technology. In the search for more Oil and Oil alternatives, the Oil industry plays a huge role. The '5 Sisters' invest heavily in alternate R&D. If you don't like Chevron, you could try Petrochina, China National Offshore Oil Corp, China National Petroleum Corp, or Total of France ,Gazprom, Rosneft , Lukoil etc..! The ethical practises of these giant Oil industry titans, make Chevron look like Greenpeace ! These are the (mostly government owned or supported) Oil industry rivals that Chevron, Shell, BP, Exxon,and Conoco-Phillips, must compete with to underpin the entire western economy. Since the World War 2, nearly every major US and Western manufacturing and resource industry has, one by one, lost out to Asian competition. Asian investment is buying up much of the worlds resources, including food production. There has been a massive transfer of wealth and resources away from Western nations. Only in the Oil industry have the '7 sisters', successfully out-manoeuvred their opponents. But for how long? The major Oil giants are being subjected to a prolonged attack by environmental groups, and left-wing governments. So far the Oil giants have accommodated these concerns, and even turned them to an advantage, but by demanding only one side plays by the rules, the West will not gain a moral victory, just another lost industry. But, that's exactly what the US haters desire. They want an impoverished and beaten Western hemisphere. They believe that by betrayal of Western values, and opening the gates to the enemy, at last, they, the losers, will finally become winners.
          Mark Schaffer
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          Poor little oil companies so picked on by those nasty leftists and environmentalists...how will they ever survive? Your last paragraph is a paranoid rant.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @Mark Schaffer Paranoid? Hmmm...maybe, but that's probably what people said about to the workers at US Steel, or the US textile industry, US Shipyards, US electronics, and a hundred other industries, no long gone. What will you say to your grandchildren when they ask why citizens of the PRC have a higher living standard than an impoverished America? What will you reply to the massive pollution created by Petrochina, China National Offshore Oil Corp, China National Petroleum Corp, Gazprom, Rosneft etc... Who will pay for your retirement plan, fund your hospitals, pay for your children's education? No one is saying that the Western oil companies are paragons of virtue, but the US is in serious competition. In a world where major US corporations must grovel to sponsor official PRC Communist Party Films and events, what was once regarded as paranoia, seems now like prudent self-preservation!
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          @David All major oil companies have been involved in some pretty ruthless behaviour. Often this is just the nature of the oil industry. Often it's an unavoidable consequence of dealing in unstable third world countries. But the Oil industry isn't alone in this sort of behaviour! The United Fruit Company of America had some pretty vicious methods, the Chemical, Mining Industries, the list goes on and on. While the Guardian newspaper is hardly an objective media outlet, but there is no denying the discovery of any mineral wealth in a third world country invariably leads to corruption and discord. (often the corruption was always present, the new wealth just brought it to the notice of the world). The Nigerian government would argue that after 3 civil wars in 50 years, it has every right to hunt down the criminal gangs and terrorists cutting the pipelines and stealing the Oil. The Guardian newspaper will always side with any rebel group (unless the government is socialist) . The oil company is caught in the middle. Remove Shell, and Total, Petrochina, LukOil etc...move in, and the situation just gets worse. Those cheering at the removal of Qaddafi, should remember that the 'rebels' only exist because of Total Oil of France funding, French military special forces, and NATO air power. The propaganda that Qaddafi had no support, is absurd when witnessing the determination of loyalists against overwhelming foreign intervention. You neglect to mention that Marathon Oil and Noble Energy, (AMPCO) are also responsible for the Bioko Island Malaria Control Project (BIMCP) in Equatorial Guinea. BIMCP has Africa's most successful malaria reduction campaign, especially among children. BIMCP is recognised as a model of a corporate humanitarian effort. Millions of lives saved. This is no mean feat in a nation ruled by one of the world's worst dictators (President Obiang Nguema). Shell is the only multi-national Corporation to be accredited as a level 3 Broad-Based Empowerment Corporation. ( Broad-Based Empowerment measures corporate programs to actively distribute wealth across a broad spectrum of South African society). But it's reasonable to assume that all multi-nationals support national governments that are best at protecting business interests . The media often cheers rebels who take government, only to discover that the new regime is even worse than the previous regime. In the meantime, billions of dollars of investment has been destroyed. (and the people are always worse off) How would the Union have viewed a multi-national Steel maker, who sided with the Confederates? It's certainly not an easy issue. Not so long ago, the world cheered the election of Pres. Mugabe, (the Guardians "Man of the Century" ) a new dawn of peace and prosperity for Zimbabwe! Whose cheering now? Difficult issues.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Marco Polo
          I do not indulge in blanket attacks on companies in particular industries, but the record of the oil companies is particularly bad. 'Shell has never denied that its oil operations have polluted large areas of the Niger Delta – land and air. But it had resisted charges of complicity in human rights abuses. Court documents now reveal that in the 1990s Shell routinely worked with Nigeria's military and mobile police to suppress resistance to its oil activities, often from activists in Ogoniland, in the delta region. Confidential memos, faxes, witness statements and other documents, released in 2009, show the company regularly paid the military to stop the peaceful protest movement against the pollution, even helping to plan raids on villages suspected of opposing the company. According to Ogoni activists, several thousand people were killed in the 1990s and many more fled that wave of terror that took place in the 1990s.' http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/oct/03/shell-oil-paid-nigerian-military The record of Marathon in its complicity in some of the most brutal exploitation in the world oil industry in Equatorial Guinea is also outstanding in its ruthlessness: http://www.afrol.com/Countries/Equatorial_Guinea/eqg_profile.htm I know people in the oil industry who have refused work rather than be complicit in the near starvation condition of the population whilst the oil and gas wealth is pumped out from under their feet. They are more like North Korea with oil than Dallas.
      Danaon
      • 3 Years Ago
      "This kind of energy doesn't come cheap." What's your definition of cheap, because it's pretty much cheaper than the alternatives.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Danaon
        My electric bike costs 11 cents per 30 miles to operate and i can get anywhere in town faster than all the cars around me.. The bike cost me about $1300 to build. That's a pretty cheap alternative i'd say.
          Danaon
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Can you carry extra people and items with your bike? How safe is your bike in a collision? What if I need to drive somewhere on the highway? Can you tow anything? Oh right, you're just being obtuse.
          Nick
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          @Danaon 1) I hardly ever need to go somewhere with someone. If I do, I take the bus, or borrow a car if I need to go outside of town. 2) Yes I can carry items on my bike. I have steel baskets above the rear wheel, that can hold 100+ LBS. You can also purchase a small trailer, and tow several hundred pounds of stuff. 3) Bicycles are not safe in case of a collision, and I happily take the risk over your bulging bags of fat, cholesterol, back pain and a bad attitude. 4) Bicycles are illegal on the highway, everybody knows that, dumbass.
          Nick
          • 3 Years Ago
          @2 Wheeled Menace
          Yep. In any dense urban environment, a bicycle (even non EV) is much faster than cars. It takes me 13 min to get home, VS 35min by bus, and up to 1h by car!
      emperor koku
      • 3 Years Ago
      As energy costs go up, people have less money to spend elsewhere...future is not bright.
      Ford Future
      • 3 Years Ago
      10 Billion on Wind Farms would have a 50 year lifespan or more, with virtually No Pollution. Not to speak of Global Warming.
        Noz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ford Future
        Such raw materials will be replaced by plant based substances if we are smart....fully recyclable, far less polluting, biodegradable. Plastics made of from petrochemicals should be abolished.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Noz
          In time, maybe. We already have serious discussions as to whether biocrops can produce enough biofuels to make a serious dent. I've got a phone made from bioplastics - it's great. I prefer the cellulose packing peanuts, I love freaking people out by eating them. But while those are great steps forward, it's going to be a very long time before conventional petrochemical-based products are replaced by bio-chemical products. Maybe when every last gram of garbage and refuse is blasted into their molecular components within plasma gasification plants...
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ford Future
        But winds farms don't provide the raw materials to make plastics, fertilizers, food additives, pharmaceuticals, and countless other needed products that are made from petrochemicals.
          emperor koku
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          All the more reason for us to conserve oil and stop using it for transportation.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          emperor koku Agreed.
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's interesting that some people scream "EVs are not feasible, too complex!" and then you see this 1/2 mile wide, multi-billion dollar floating oil refinery thing.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        Well, I don't think people feel EVs are too complex. They are actually damn simple compared to ICE cars. It is just the up-front cost, the range, and the refuel time that hurt EVs.
        Noz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Nick
        I think 10 Billion dollars would have solved those problems.
      uncle_sam
      • 3 Years Ago
      A big leak unter the artic. then the weather gets bad, and everything freezes up. but the oil is still pouring out of its holes. then whe hear the CEOs. We are sorry. we are sooo sorry? you hear...
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @uncle_sam
        You're right, that's always the risk ! CEO's shouldn't apologise. Such risks are the price of Oil extraction. If you don't want drilling, just declare the area protected. If not, then everyone shares the responsibility!
        Noz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @uncle_sam
        We don't decide what is protected...the oil companies do....the people lost their power a long time ago.
      Ford Future
      • 3 Years Ago
      Do we need a LAW to demand they move to clean energy already? Every Investment in fossil fuel should be MATCHED 1 for 1 with an investment in clean energy. It's time Shareholders REVOLTED. This is incompetence.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ford Future
        Sorry but that's now how private business works. They put 10 billion into this because they know they'll get money out. There is no alternative right now.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Ford Future
        Shareholders revolt? Why would they do that? All they care about is dividends & stock appreciation. And that is not as easy with clean energy. But we do need to tax fossil fuels more to recapture the externalities not captured in the price (pollution, dept. of defense spending, CO2, higher healthcare costs from respiratory ailments, etc.)
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @ Spec, Absolutely correct! As for taxing fossil fuels, (for whatever reason) that's a purely government decision. National governments are responsible for national economies. If a government feels it can tax fossil fuels and still get elected, despite massive price increases and economic disruption, that's the risk every government must accept. Oil companies, like all corporate citizens can express their views on the wisdom of these decisions, but essentially like all citizens must accept the governments mandate. But it must be remembered that the ordinary consumer, especially the poorest, must bear the cost of such taxes, not the Oil companies. There was a time when left wing governments could gain popularity by heavily taxing unpopular industries. Taxpayers are more wary now, and see such actions a economically risky and a sign of poor economic management. The complex ramifications of such tax initiatives, must be very carefully calculated to ensure that results are truly beneficial and not just dissipated by irresponsible government vote-buying extravagance for short term gain, and long term pain.
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      As Oil depletion becomes more obvious, Oil exploration and extraction technology will become increasingly expensive and more complex. Western Oil companies are desperate to locate Oil in places that are easily controlled by advanced technology, where their expertise and capital resources can compete with the hunger of PRC and Russian Oil companies. This sort of Oil extraction technology is new and risky. At these depths and circumstances there is no margin for error. Those who argue that these new fields are potentially environmentally harmful, are correct. The counter-argument that no matter the risk, the world needs oil, is also correct! ( especially if Shell doesn't drill PetroChina will!) I understand, and even empathise with the sentiments of commentators like 'fordinsight'. What he proposes has no real ability to work, and shows and astonishing lack of reality, but you can't fault his motives. Truth is that Oil as a transport fuel has a very limited future due to economic depletion, but right now over 3 billion products rely on oil to provide the world's population a means of existence. The biggest investors in alternate energy production, are the giant Western Oil companies. These corporation understand that transport oil will be soon become uneconomic. The Oil industry is so integral to the world economy, in ways very complex to assess, that disengagement and replacement will be incredibly difficult and complex. Wild demands and idiotic conspiracy theories are simply unhelpful. Yet, replacements for this dwindling resource will have to be found, EVs are a part of the solution.
        Smith Jim
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        When you say, "idiotic conspiracy theories" I think of people who believe AGW is a hoax. The electromagnetic absorption spectra of CO2 is as fundamental as Maxwell's equations. http://www.google.com/search?q=maxwell's+equations&hl=en&safe=off&biw=1364&bih=683&site=webhp&prmd=imvnsb&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=CmaHTtm3HoaosQKZsKGZDw&sqi=2&ved=0CDgQsAQ
          Smith Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          http://webbook.nist.gov/cgi/cbook.cgi?Spec=C124389&Index=0&Type=IR&Large=on
          Smith Jim
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          http://chartsgraphs.wordpress.com/2009/12/07/understanding-the-science-of-co2%E2%80%99s-role-in-climate-change-3-%E2%80%93-how-green-house-gases-trap-heat/
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Smith Jim
          When I referred to " idiotic conspiracy' theories" , I was not referring to AGW.
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Marco Polo
        I agree with most of that . . . but I don't know if I'd say the biggest investors in alt-energy are the Western oil companies. They make some token investments . . . but it is pennies compared to their continued oil investments. They are largely PR efforts, not sincere efforts. All those solar and EV companies wouldn't be trying to get government loans if the oil companies were really into green energy.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @Spec, You are confusing ideology with commercial reality.There is no 'moral' obligation on any Oil company to invest in anything outside of their shareholders best financial interests. Shell's enormous investment in bio-fuel R&D is driven by a desire to find an energy source compatible with it's existing infrastructure. BP invests for the same reason, (Although it's Solar efforts back in the 70-80's were motivated by Lord Browne's more idealistic tenure) Exxon and Conoco-Phillips syndicates will drive potentially immense investments in Bio-fuel feedstock research, in an effort to match and exceed Shell. Without Chevron's huge and long term investment in the otherwise abandoned Geo-thermal Industry, Geo-thermal would have remained a moribund investment, abandoned by private and government investment alike, in every country except Iceland and New Zealand. For many years, BP was alone in R&D into the replacement of bunker oil for marine use. (Now, almost no one's interested!). Oil companies must produce huge profits and retain capital reserves far in excess of other businesses due to the high risk nature of exploration and production. If Oil companies invest in alternate energy, it's in the hope of commercial return, not ideology. It would be irresponsible of these companies to act otherwise. Shell's bio-fuel investments are not pennies. Chevron's Geo-thermal investments are over 70% of total Geo-thermal investment, but no Oil company can afford to ignore its base product and what generates it's huge capital investment base. Without the enormous profitable revenues generated by oil companies, most of the world economies would collapse, creating human misery and hardship on an unimaginable scale.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @Spec i think you are still missing the point. Oil companies actually do make huge investments in alternate energy. BP still has the largest single investment in Solar. Chevron is by far the largest investor in Geo-thermal. The Oil companies through their investment banks indirectly finance 32% of all Venture Capital funding. Since the Virent process was discovered Shell, BP, Exxon,Chevron, Conoco-Phillips have returned to funding Bio-gasoline ( A new product, not a combination of bio and gasoline). This is understandable, since this fuel can replace all the various types of energy not replaceable with Electricity. If these competing syndicates are able to succeed in solving the feedstock dynamic, then renewable fuel resources will become the new Oil industry, with investment on a scale unprecedented in human history. Exactly as you say, the oil companies wish to preserve Oil for more valuable products than fuel. Their motive are commercial, not idealistic! So what? That's what they are, commercial corporations!
          EVSUPERHERO
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          Great Marco another to big to fail scenario... The whalers were once to big to fail. What happened their? You propose business as usual and the oil corps will find us a way out and they are to big to fight any way and if you fight and win, you still loose. The banking system in our country would have us believe the same thing. We tax oil now and the benefits and the hardships are cast upon us. We do not tax oil now and the oil corps benefit and the hardships are cast upon us. If the banks failed, many small banks would have popped up to take the slack up. If they oil corps fail, alternative become more viable, to big to fail solves no problems but only make you dependant on one source instead of many.
          Spec
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Spec
          @Marco Polo No, I'm just talking reality and facts. Other people are investing in green energy, not the oil companies. It is not oil companies owning Vestas, SMA, Schott, Sanyo, Brightsource, FirstSolar, Tesla, etc. Yeah, they invest in biofuels but that is just so they can have something to cut their oil with.
      • 2 Years Ago
      http://oilandgassearch.livejournal.com/ innovation in oil and gas exploration
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