General Motors manufacturing facilities around the country have begun ratifying the tentative labor agreement between the automaker and the United Auto Workers. Both Flint and Lansing were the first plants to vote for the new deal over the weekend, though others are beginning to fall in line, including the St. Louis-area plant in Wentzville, which has been earmarked for a $380M investment to help build a new mid-size pickup, along with Spring Hill, Tennessee, former home of the now defunct Saturn brand. A total of 48,500 GM workers are expected to vote on the measure by the time the issue comes to a close. All-in, Reuters reports that 15 plants have voted for the new contract, three have voted against ratification, and there are 35 yet to vote.

The Detroit Free Press is also reporting that a deal with the Ford Motor Company may also be struck by week's end. The UAW is also continuing negotiations with Chrysler, which have endured some early hiccups.

GM and the UAW agreed on a deal that would see new entry-level workers receive a $2-3 hourly raise over the next four years, as well as a $5,000 signing bonus and a yearly $1,000 lump-sum inflation protection bonus.


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  • 31 Comments
      Adam
      • 3 Years Ago
      SERIOUSLY? 5k singing bonus and 1k yearly bonus that's inflation protect? SIGN ME UP!
      Gregory Martin
      • 3 Years Ago
      UAW needs to be dismantled or rethought... I'm not saying that they don't (and didn't) serve a purpose but their over all business presence in the auto industry is appearing to be counter productive and irritating. These guys just have terrible timing for EVERYTHING.
        TelegramSam
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gregory Martin
        Guess what, a living wage and retirement plan are essential for all Americans. It used to be that private companies took responsibility, and offered their workers a plan which aided in retirement. To do this, they had to pay their workers a reasonable amount, so they could contribute to that plan a little themselves and live. These days, that responsibility has been foisted upon the Government, because American companies no longer to be responsible for those they lead. It's not very surprising that these reasonable benefits started to taper off along side the fall of American labor.
          TelegramSam
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TelegramSam
          @Gregory But if corporations just took care of their own (remember when it was common to spend a whole career at one place and get a pension?), we wouldn't need large bureaucratic organizations as a check on greedy corporations. You're picking on normal people who want a few extra bucks to send kids to college, go on vacations with their family, buy a project car for the weekends, all things you could probably understand, yourself. On the other hand there are the executives, that have already secured their kids trust funds, divorced their original wives, and want to take the newest girlfriend to whatever the flashiest new South American resort is. I know where my sympathy lies.
          Renaurd
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TelegramSam
          People that trash Unions are uninformed at best. I'm afraid when they find themselves working for 5 bucks an hour it will be too late. Corporations are already lobbying politicians to end the wage an hour law, companies are working temps to keep from paying vacation pay, and insurance. Those that want to work for third world wages may do so but you had better educate yourself about unions, they gave you the wages you have today, plus your vacation pay, 4o hour work week, overtime, and the list goes on and on. Apparently the youth of today believe all of this came about from the goodness of corporate America's heart, bullcrap on that. Educate yourself people while you can.
          Gregory Martin
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TelegramSam
          To disagree with the modern union DOES NOT mean I don't know where they came from, or what they have done for this country. It is just as blind to think they are wonderful for corporations in the current state they are in. UAW has become its own living identity now within companies. Many times becoming an overbearing father. A designer can't pick up a sculpting tool to help with a future designs because it's "not his job", and just the same a UAW worker can be on "idle" and still get paid. Living wages should come with work, and for some reason (especially in this country) people think they don't have to and still get paid. Fact of life, the debt has a lot to do with spending money without solutions. UAW just needs to be more clear in there intentions/reasoning rather than asking for "more" money....they are already the highest paid in the industry.
        Gregory Martin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Gregory Martin
        @TelegramSam I have two major issues, the first being the blanket statement about executives, not all are pleasure riding scum bags. It takes a lot of hard work to manage people and PREVENT people from loosing there jobs. Normal people are typically responsible for very low numbers within a company. It's all relative. Now I don't agree on unfair compensation on any level, but those people have definitely got to were they are by not being dumb... Secondly, no one is picking on anyone (biggest problem in business is people taking things to personal) while sympathetic of workers, I believe they should be payed fairly related to the business NOT the UAW. UAW can throw out any damn number but it doesn't mean it is right for the long term survival of the company. I will always support equal pay but never greed at ANY level, especially when it could cost long term growth.
          TelegramSam
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Gregory Martin
          You said, "Living wages should come with work, and for some reason (especially in this country) people think they don't have to and still get paid." I agree with this statement. What I don't agree with, is that UAW workers, don't work, but still want pay. They do, in fact, work. So why are you entitled to make blanket statements about workers, but it's absurd to play to the stereotypes about executives? You also said, "Normal people are typically responsible for very low numbers within a company." The average person, at your average company, is... average. Most workers in any profession are not above average. Who gets to decide what "Fair" pay amounts to? Apparently you have deemed $2-3 an hour raises, for the lowest of the ranks, as well as a signing bonus, and a cost of living adjustment. I'm sure the automakers don't like paying extra, but how is this unfair?
      Coop
      • 3 Years Ago
      ahhh the UAW....making a $20k car cost $30k for 100(?) years!!!! God bless 'em!!!!
        Renaurd
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Coop
        I'm sorry but you have no damn clue.
          Jeremy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          I seriously would like to know why UAW worker feel they deserves all the benefits that they get and fight for. Am I wrong that an assembly line worker can easily be replaced and trained bringing them up to speed within a month or less? Yes it is great to be able to live comfortably on your wage and have benefits but it is not a right and it not a right to have kids. They are expensive if you can’t afford them don’t have them. Am I wrong in believing that you should get paid the value that you are worth , if you can be easily replace and have no seriously skill set besides willing to work hard you don’t deserve much. Minimum wage was not meant to live on. I went to school and got an education to try to make myself valuable to an employer. When I graduated my salary was low and rightfully so for I provided little value to the company. Now I gained some experience and knowledge and make a great wage, while giving back to my employer the skills I have developed. Do UAW workers provide that? What do they provide automotive manufactures? These are serious questions; I am not trying to mock UAW just trying to become informed.
          Jeremy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          please inform us
          TelegramSam
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          @Jeremy I would seriously like to know, why you feel you deserve anything that your have. Maybe you should consult the AutoBlog message board when you want a raise.
          Jeremy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          That was a serious question sir
          Jeremy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          great argument, I am done
          Jeremy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          um I believe I already explained why I deserve what I get . I have gained knowledge and skill through education and experience and give that back to the company I work for, in return I get a fair salary. When I want a raise I develop more skills or take on more responsibilities, I don't strike. Sometimes I overcome the budget in which a company can afford to pay me and I understand that is business and economics; I don't strike I move to a different company with a bigger budget that has a greater value or need for my skills.
      Mike K
      • 3 Years Ago
      UAW - The leeches of the automotive industry.
      Winsom Cash
      • 3 Years Ago
      there must be a lot of UAW members on Autoblog, just an observation........
        Ducman69
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Winsom Cash
        There are, as there is a massive change in voting and gallup polls show the majority of the nation is not only anti-union but particularly so when it comes to outright criminal organizations like the UAW. I'll still continue to buy American made cars, but by non-UAW labor in Mercedes, Toyota, and Honda plants right here in the USA.
      tylermars.design
      • 3 Years Ago
      just.....no words.
      Danny Eckel
      • 3 Years Ago
      And people wonder why manufacturers want to shift production over seas......
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Danny Eckel
        [blocked]
          Adrian
          • 3 Years Ago
          EXACTLY. I love how Americans think unions only exist here, when in reality they are even more powerful in nearly every country except China.
      Phandara1971
      • 3 Years Ago
      The line worker in that photo really needs to wear socks. I can't imagine how his feet must feel, and smell like, at the end of a shift. All the money these guys make, you think this would be common sense.
      Adrian
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here come the pro-union/anti-union rants from the usuals. How about just researching which car is best for your needs, and buying it? What a novel idea.
      mrokner
      • 3 Years Ago
      Clearly, these unions are not going away any time soon, even though they have already went above and beyond in accomplishing their goal of basic human working conditions many decades ago. Their new goal is no different than religion or a cult or a Columbia DVD program, build membership and make money. The jobs bank program is an insult and disgrace to the rest of America. What makes you special? Join the Gov't unemployment line like everybody else. Did your insane demands cause the big three to fail or flounder? No. But you were a factor and didn't make things easier. If the company is doing well, then you should get a fair cut of the profit. If they are doing poorly, you should get nothing, just like the rest of the private sector. You are not special or different that you deserve special treatment. If you guys are really about fair treatment, tell your president to stop being greedy and only take what your PARENT (i.e. Ford, GM) can afford to pay without burdening them.
        TelegramSam
        • 3 Years Ago
        @mrokner
        You said, "The jobs bank program is an insult and disgrace to the rest of America. What makes you special?" I believe it is the union dues, paid by each member that fund the Jobs Bank. That is what makes them so special, they helped fund the jobs bank (through their dues), and if needed they benefit from it. Why do they get this special privilege? Simple, they pay for it. Why does this insult you? It isn't your money. Also corporations are not our parents, and workers are not "subjects" of their employer. It is not up to the worker to ensure that their compensation is not too "burdensome".
          mrokner
          • 3 Years Ago
          @TelegramSam
          Good, glad to hear you think you deserve bonuses and dues, regardless of a company's health. Glad you answered that directly and didn't avoid it.
      Jeremy
      • 3 Years Ago
      UAW has been blamed for the automotive industry crisis of 2008-2009. Union workers' higher wages and more generous benefits has been compared to those working at union Japanese auto plants in the U.S. as one of the primary reasons for the poor competitiveness of the Big Three. In a November 23, 2008, New York Times editorial, Andrew Ross Sorkin claimed that the average UAW worker was paid $70 per hour, including health and pension costs, while Toyota workers in the US receive $10 to $20 less.[18] The UAW asserts that most of this labor cost disparity comes from legacy pension and healthcare benefits to retired members, of which the Japanese automakers have none. The Big Three already sold their cars for about $2,500 less than equivalent cars from Japanese companies, analysts at the International Motor Vehicle Program say.[19] According to the 2007 GM Annual Report, typical autoworkers earn a base wage of approximately $28 per hour (higher than the average university educated engineer). Following the 2007 National Agreement, the base starting wage was lowered to about $15 per hour.[20] A second-tier wage of $14.50 an hour, which applies only to newly-hired workers, is lower than the average wage in nonunion auto companies in the Deep South.[21] One of the benefits negotiated by the United Auto Workers was the jobs bank program, under which laid-off members received 95 percent of their take-home pay and benefits. More than 12,000 UAW members were paid this benefit in 2005.[22] In December 2008, the UAW agreed to suspend the program as a concession to help U.S. automakers during the auto industry crisis.[23] UAW Leadership granted concessions to its unions in order to win labor peace, a benefit not calculated by the UAW's many critics.[24] The UAW has claimed that the primary cause of the automotive sector's weakness was substantially more expensive fuel costs[25] linked to the 2003-2008 oil crisis which caused customers to turn away from large sport utility vehicles (SUVs) and pickup trucks,[26] the main market of the American "Big Three" (General Motors, Ford, and Chrysler). In 2008, the situation became critical because the global financial crisis and the related credit crunch significantly impaired the ability of consumers to purchase automobiles.[27] The Big Three also based their respective market strategies on fuel-inefficient SUVs, and suffered from lower quality perception (vis-a-vis automobiles manufactured by Japanese or European car makers). Accordingly, the Big Three directed vehicle development focused on light trucks (which had better profit margins) in order to offset the considerably higher labor costs, falling considerably behind in the sedan market segments to Japanese and European automakers.[28]
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