Annual worldwide sales of natural gas vehicles will jump 68 percent to 3.2 million vehicles in 2016 from 1.9 million in 2010, according to Pike Research. The surge, says Pike, will be driven mainly by fleets looking to cut petroleum dependency and reduce operating costs.

In the U.S., annual natural gas vehicle sales will almost quadruple to 33,000 vehicles in 2016, up from an estimated 8,400 in 2012. Among individual countries, India will overtake Iran as the world's leading user of natural gas vehicles by 2016. Oil-rich Iran will apparently turn more and more to natural gas as a fuel because using petroleum means that the nation would turn less profit from selling the crude to foreign countries.

Even if the U.S.' use of natural gas does quadruple, it will continue to account for a near-meaningless percentage of worldwide natural gas vehicles. This, says Pike, is due to a lack of infrastructure. As of September 1, there were an estimated 946 operational natural gas fueling stations in the U.S., compared to 3,200 public-access electric vehicle charge points and nearly 125,000 gas stations. Lack of infrastructure aside, the fact that only one production passenger vehicle sold in the U.S. is capable of burning natural gas – the 2012 Honda Civic Natural Gas – is quite a bottleneck.
Show full PR text
Commercial Fleets Will Power Natural Gas Vehicle Market through 2016

September 14, 2011

There are currently about 12.6 million natural gas vehicles (NGVs) in use worldwide, and sales of NGVs vary widely from region to region and country to country. The majority of NGVs are located in Latin America, the Middle East, and Africa, particularly in countries like Pakistan and Iran that lack extensive gasoline refining capacity. In North America, due largely to a lack of convenient refueling stations, demand for NGVs is largely relegated to the fleet market. Worldwide sales of natural gas vehicles are expected to grow rapidly over the next five years, to 3.2 million units annually by 2016 from 1.9 million in 2010, according to a recent report from Pike Research. The consumer market will continue to lag growth in commercial fleets, however: three-quarters of the new growth between 2010 and 2016 will come in corporate and government sales.

As a portion of the worldwide total, the percentage of commercial NGVs will rise from 59 in that period, according to senior analyst Dave Hurst.

"Many manufacturers and industry observers are looking forward to the time when consumer NGVs become the next big thing," says Hurst. "But the number of refueling stations remains too low for the consumer market to really take off in many parts of the developed world."

One solution to the current inadequacies in NGV infrastructure is the spread of bi-fuel vehicles. Popular in Latin America, where almost 90% of NGVs have bi-fuel engines, these vehicles can run on either gasoline or compressed natural gas (CNG).

India, which has one of the largest fleets of CNG buses in the world, is expected to overtake Iran for the lead in NGV sales by 2014. By 2016 there will be 612,000 NGVs in India, according to Pike Research's analysis. The strongest growth, however, will occur in the United States, where a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 25.4% will result in nearly 33,000 vehicles sold in 2016.

Pike Research's report, "Natural Gas Vehicles", provides a comprehensive examination of natural gas vehicle technologies, compressed and liquefied natural gas shipping and storage, governmental incentives and regulations, and key drivers of market growth. The report includes forecasts of NGV sales, refueling infrastructure, and natural gas usage through 2016 for light-duty vehicles and medium/heavy duty trucks and buses. Key market players are also profiled. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the firm's website.

Pike Research is a market research and consulting firm that provides in-depth analysis of global clean technology markets. The company's research methodology combines supply-side industry analysis, end-user primary research and demand assessment, and deep examination of technology trends to provide a comprehensive view of the Smart Energy, Smart Grid, Smart Transportation, Smart Industry, and Smart Buildings sectors.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 22 Comments
      fairfireman21
      • 3 Years Ago
      The 2011 Honda Civic GX CNG car Will get about 218 miles out of 7.8 (gasoline gallon equivalent) @ 3600 psi. City/ highway/ combined 24/ 36/ 28. The price for them start at $25,500. With no refueling stations everywhere including around home this thing is just an expencive paper weight. Now if you could refuel just about everywher then it might be ok. I do not even see a lot of towns or cities letting you fill at home because CNG @ 3600 psi is a bomb.
        Ford Future
        • 3 Years Ago
        @fairfireman21
        So a hybrid is Much Better. With 44/44/44. http://www.hybridcars.com/news/hybridcarscom-achieves-687-mpg-2012-honda-civic-hybrid-29764.html CNG Too Late.
          fairfireman21
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Ford Future
          Yes they are. You can fill a hybrid from anywhere too. You can even get a better mileage hybrid for the same price, without having a bomb on board.
        JP
        • 3 Years Ago
        @fairfireman21
        Actual users report more like 160-180 miles of range.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Globally it makes sense to use methane as a mid-term fuel over gasoline and diesel, especially in areas such as India and some areas of Europe and Americas. In the long term of 2050-2300 (expected methane reserves, exc. biological sources), only electric motor efficiency makes sense. There just isn't enough money to make deserts into utopian algae fuel farms (even in long-term) to feed the billion combustion engines of yesterday. Especially, when methane is also used in heat and power plants (both on- and off-peak).
      • 3 Years Ago
      Dangerous natural gas drilling in America.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZe1AeH0Qz8 ff
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        Waaa I am against everything that is commercially viable.
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      Chriss m oppose the idea of selling a car that have 2 tanks, one for gasoline and one for natural gas and that you can use as a bi-fuel nat gas and/or gasoline. He said last month that it occupy too much space in the car. Who would buy a car that has only a nat gas tank and no gasoline tank even if a gasoline tank is a proven effective technology and can make your vehicle able to go everywhere anytime. Iran is actually lauphing of the usa and canada is automaticcally following the usa for every and each policy and cultural thing the day after and i live in canada and im interrested in buying a bi-fuel nat gas plus gasoline car. This site is for ordering a car put on sale near where you live. With 946 nat gas refueling stations available many many car owners will buy these bi-fuel cars and trucks. Also india have hythane, a mix of gazeous hydrogen bonded to 25% nat gas. germany is heading toward nat gas made from co2 and water so do the same in usa and canada will follow exactly the day after and i will buy my buying bid like i alweays do anyway.
        EVSUPERHERO
        • 3 Years Ago
        @goodoldgorr
        Gorr, what is your fixation with Chris M?
          goodoldgorr
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          Chris M is the one responding to a lot of my posts and he do like he's working for big oil ( goverment, democrat, republican, journalists, exxon, chevron, citgo, exxon valdez retirees workers, nasdaq, arm traders, security agents, us army, scientists, subsidized business, gm, ford, toyota, honda, mercedes, bp, saudi-arabia petrol workers and bankers, swiss banks, greenpeace, rock and roll musicians, u.r.s.s, zone 51 residents, boieng, caterpillar, canadian goverment, kaddafi and the new power in lybia and tousand and tousand of others ).
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @EVSUPERHERO
          Hmmm. he covered about all of us in that post....
      • 3 Years Ago
      WHAT ABOUT AUTOGAS ? (Liquefied Petroleum Gas) Isn't it cheaper to convert a car to Autogas than to buy a new NG car? Autogas conversion kits start from $3,000. http://alternativefuels.about.com/od/propan1/a/propaneconvert.htm Also any car can be converted to Autogas and the driver can turn a switch to alternate from Autogas to gasoline. Moreover, there are over 2600 Autogas refueling stations in the US http://pixiegas.com/tag/lpg-fueling-stations/ Locator: http://www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/locator/stations/ ff
      Neil Blanchard
      • 3 Years Ago
      CNG requires that you fill up at home, after installing the equipment. There are zero filling stations around here, as far as I know. The infrastructure for CNG is far worse than for EV's. What is the range of a typical CNG car? Neil
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Neil Blanchard
        The CNG Civic gets between 220-250 miles, more than adequate for a commuter vehicle.
          EZEE
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Yea, but Neil's point is well made regardless of range. I might have range anxiety in an electric, however, I will bring an extension cord with me to plug it in where ever I go (and hide the cord, with leaves, so no one sees me) - so however slow, I WILL get to where I am going. With CNG - once you are done, you are DONE.
          JP
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Is it more efficient in a fuel cell when you add in the high compression losses required to get it into a tank that fits in a vehicle? Then there are the costs of FCV's compared to EV's, where EV's clearly win.
          JP
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          In actual use it gets much less of course, 160-180 miles. It's also much more efficient to burn NG in a combined cycle generating plant to charge EV's than it is to burn it in an inefficient ICE.
          Letstakeawalk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          ...and it's even more efficient to pass the natural gas through a fuel cell to create electricity than to burn it in a CC turbine...
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      68% jump sounds impressive until you realize that you are starting from near zero.
        EZEE
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Look at me agreeing with Spec. I have seen a FEW converted Lincoln Town Cars (not being built anymore) at airports and such. But considering the local power company has some Fuel Cell powered Focii motoring around town (logo's painted all over so you don't miss them), I see more of those than the natural gas vehicles. I guess it is a start....
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        As with most pike research articles. They work off of 1-2 years of data, extrapolate it over ~10 years, send it to autoblog, then we have a news article to banter over.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      lol, pike.
    • Load More Comments