• Sep 24, 2011
Over in the Netherlands, Neste Oil has celebrated the opening of Europe's largest renewable diesel facility. Located in Rotterdam, Neste Oil's new site boasts an annual production capacity of 800,000 tons of the firm's NExBTL renewable diesel fuel. NExBTL technology allows Neste to use a wide variety of oils, greases and fats as feedstock to make the fuel.

The firing up of the Rotterdam facility (Neste Oil's fourth renewable diesel site) marks a significant milestone in Neste Oil's clean-fuel strategy by securing the firm's position as the world's number one (by volume) producer of renewable diesel. With the facility now online, Neste Oil has the ability to pump out more than two million tons of renewable biodiesel a year. NExBTL supposedly reduces greenhouse gas emissions by up to 80 percent compared to fossil diesel and its clean-burning properties make it especially valuable in heavily polluted urban centers.
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Neste Oil starts up Europe's largest renewable diesel plant in Rotterdam

ESPOO, FINLAND--(Marketwire - Sep 20, 2011) -

Neste Oil has successfully started up Europe's largest renewable diesel plant in Rotterdam in the Netherlands. Production of NExBTL renewable diesel at the new plant will be ramped up on a phased basis. The start-up is a significant milestone in Neste Oil's cleaner traffic strategy and consolidates the company's position as the world's leading producer of renewable diesel. The plant was completed on-schedule and on-budget.

"We are very proud of the new plant in Rotterdam," says Neste Oil's President and CEO, Matti Lievonen. "It will help us meet demand in the European market, the world's largest for renewable diesel."

The Rotterdam plant has a capacity of 800,000 t/a and will increase Neste Oil's total renewable diesel capacity to 2 million t/a. Utilizing Neste Oil's proprietary NExBTL technology, the plant can make flexible use of almost any vegetable oil or waste fat in the production of premium-quality renewable diesel. The plant employs approximately 150 people, consisting of 110 Neste Oil employees and 40 service provider personnel.

Neste Oil already operates a renewable diesel plant in Singapore that came on stream in 2010 and two plants in Porvoo in Finland that came on stream in 2007 and 2009. All of Neste Oil's NExBTL plants produce renewable diesel and have the capability to produce NExBTL renewable aviation fuel.

"The Rotterdam plant is Neste Oil's fourth facility producing high-quality renewable diesel. With its start-up, our major EUR 1.5 billion investment program aimed at increasing our renewable diesel production capacity has entered its final stage. The successful completion of the program underlines our strong commitment to providing solutions that help meet the world's growing energy demand and need to reduce traffic-related emissions," continues Lievonen.

Neste Oil's NExBTL renewable diesel is a premium fuel that is compatible with all diesel engines and existing fuel distribution systems. It offers excellent performance at low temperatures and can be used either blended with fossil diesel or as such. NExBTL helps reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40-80% compared to fossil diesel. Its lower tailpipe emissions also make a valuable contribution to enhancing overall air quality, especially in urban areas.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 2 Comments
      harlanx6
      • 23 Hours Ago
      It's a logical move for a nation with ag land and insufficient oil reserves. Basically it's economic.
      • 23 Hours Ago
      Is there any word on their cost per gallon? It would be interesting to start comparing different kinds of oil feed stocks (palm vs canola etc.) and to see what the costs - and yields per acre would look like. Does any one have any references? Great article. Thanks. David.