Marc Cameron and Paul "Moose" Curtis, are an artistic twosome that are exceedingly skilled at turning dirt, grime and muck into art. In fact, the pair have teamed up to create our favorite kind of art – the sort that features automobiles as the subject. Starting with a spot on a dirt-covered wall in Munich, Moose and Cameron remove the buildup of gunk in various layers leaving behind their desired image.

It's called "reverse graffiti" or "grime writing," and rather than covering a wall in paint, Cameron and Moose actually clean a portion of the area they're working on. Some stencils, a few helping hands and a high-pressure power washer are the tools at work, and the resulting image not only illustrates how polluted public surfaces can be, it's also wonderful spin on a form of art that's typically frowned up.

Click past the jump to watch a reverse graffiti Tesla Roadster come to life, a project Cameron and Curtis coordinated with German's SZ-Magazin. Also, click through the gallery to get a closer look at some more of Marc and Paul's work, including the Renault Twizy. If you are interested in learning more about Marc's unique work, feel free to email him – Cameron @ Cameron2210.com or check out his website using the link below.


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  • 30 Comments
      Winsom Cash
      • 3 Years Ago
      stupid, how much water, gas and electricity have they wasted? besides anyone can spray water with wooden guides...........what a joke!
        Ak74
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Winsom Cash
        The purpose is not to clean the walls. It is to promote green attitude for people.
          RWD
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Ak74
          Besides the waste of water and fuel, when a company is called to pressure wash a large filthy surface in a public area (walls, parking lots, etc) they often set up sand bags and collect the waste water with a sump pump. All that water is now saturated with decades worth of soot, and should not be allowed to run into nearby storm drains. If they want to promote green, they should start by actually practicing it.
      MTU 5.0
      • 3 Years Ago
      First it's "dirt", then "grime", then "muck", and then magically makes the leap to "pollution." I think the first three were far more accurate. Build a concrete wall in the middle of nowhere and leave it untouched for a few years. It will look just the same even if man was 1000 miles away the entire time. The images of the cars are cool either way, even with the not so subtle eco messaging in their choices. ;)
      Stephen Smalling
      • 3 Years Ago
      Wow why all the hate. I think it's awesome. The guys playing with shading and everything, not just powerwashing directly over the stencil. Very cool stuff and car themed to boot. I'll take it.
      Sekinu2
      • 3 Years Ago
      Very stupid and it is not graffetti as they use a stencile so no actual artisc work being done.
      Andre Neves
      • 3 Years Ago
      Cleaning surfaces using stencils and calling it "Art". *sigh* And sometimes I think i've heard it all. They will call ANYTHING "Art" these days.
        Vettro
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Andre Neves
        Did you watch the video? He is actually adding some shape and highlights by washing away variable amounts of grime. Yes, the definition of "art" is always debatable but what he is doing is not just making a stencil and washing around it. The technique he is using is very similar to airbrush illustration which I guess is not art either based on your opinion.
          Andre Neves
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Vettro
          Kris, Stencil away dirt and calling it Art is stupid in itself. There IS no definition of the word "Art".
          Kris
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Vettro
          @Andre Neves, maybe you should. Then you'll become a famous artist, you'll get rich and you'll STOP POSTING RETARDED COMMENTS! But first learn the definition of art.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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      WhyNotV2
      • 3 Years Ago
      I've been doing this on my paver patio for years. Since it's under a fair amount of trees it gets pretty dirty. Add to that the polution in the air that's brought down when it rains and instant canvas. Each spring I power wash the stones and have a couple resin fish I use as stencils. After a couple hours, I have a school of fish of varying depths/intensities and some kelp. Kind of cool though not original.
      RWD
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is really no different than any other graffiti, albeit using a different and neat method. All sorts of graffiti can be artistic. It stands out, demands your attention. It's also similarly hard to remove. No one commissioned them to do it, in fact most people they asked refused (at least they asked). I think taking a photo of a car and reproducing it on a wall is really stretching what could be loosely defined as "art", no matter the method. Nothing was created here, merely duplicated. Funnily enough, they are washing away layers of air pollution to create a piece of visual pollution. Maybe I'm alone, but I don't think that every blank surface needs someone's idea of artistic expression splattered on it. We become inundated by it, surrounded. Maybe I'd like to be able to walk or drive down the street and simply admire the clouds, trees, or perhaps interesting architecture... rather than having my attention CONSTANTLY drawn to everyone's little (or big) personal statements. In this case, free advertising. At least major corporations have limits on where they can legally smear their logo feces across the landscape. Sorry, had to quote Carlin there. The documentary "Vigilante Vigilante" is a very interesting window into this subject.
        CH
        • 3 Years Ago
        @RWD
        Ironically they only chose full electric vehicles as subject for their "art" on a surface that was polluted by vehicles with internal combustion engines. Their visual pollution, as you unanimously put it, was in my humble opinion their own way of calling attention to the already polluted world we live in and what to do about it. Art is the product or process of deliberately arranging items (often with symbolic significance) in a way that influences and affects one or more of the senses, emotions, and intellect. It encompasses a diverse range of human activities, creations, and modes of expression. Therefore I would absolutely qualify the work they did, as art as it did have a symbolic significance. Instead of seeing a dirty, grimy wall you now see a picture of an alternative that wont (directly) cause the dirt and grime on said wall. On the other hand, if you’d rather be looking at trees, there surely are some woods nearby, nobody is keeping you here in this post or there in front of the wall itself.
          WillieD
          • 3 Years Ago
          @CH
          How do you know the wall was polluted by cars? Grime will build up on anything over time, not because of pollution.
      infocars365.com
      • 3 Years Ago
      great designers!!
      xmailboxcancerx
      • 3 Years Ago
      Eye of the beholder, man. (1) The billionaire oil heiresses that own a couple rare high-dollar Thomas Cole landscapes stuffed away in their Victorian chateaus will HATE this kind of riff-raff "art". (2) People like me LOVE this kind of thing.
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