The Prius Plug-in Hybrid has a price: $32,000. That's the just-announced MSRP for the base plug-in hybrid, with the top-of-the-line Prius Plug-in Hybrid Advanced jumping all the way up to $39,525. Because the both of these Prius Plug-in models have a 4.4-kWh, 176 pound battery pack, it should qualify for a federal tax credit of $2,500. Toyota has also announced that the larger Prius V, which does not qualify for any tax incentives, will start at $26,400. *All vehicles are subject to a $760 delivery fee.

Toyota says the plug-in Prius will be available in 14 western and East Coast states next spring and in all 50 states in 2013. The Japanese automaker is predicting 15,000 sales in the first full year and the Prius family could eventually be the company's best-selling nameplate once all members are on sale – presuming overall hybrid sales increase.

Recently, Toyota announced a partnership with Leviton to provide charging stations. Today, Toyota said that it will offer Leviton's 16 Amp, Level 2 charging station for $999 (including installation), starting in early October. Starting next month, Toyota will start taking reservations for the Prius Plug-in at its website next month. Starting some time later today, you can watch a video about how to order a Prius Plug-in over at the official site.

So, how 'bout it: does a plug-in Prius starting at $32,000 sound right to you? Mull over the official press release after the jump and then leave your thoughts in Comments.
Show full PR text
TOYOTA ANNOUNCES PRICING FOR ALL-NEW 2012 PRIUS v AND PRIUS PLUG-IN HYBRID VEHICLES

RICHMOND, Calif., September 16, 2011 - - Toyota Motor Sales (TMS), U.S.A., Inc. announced manufacturer's suggested retail prices (MSRP) here today at the annual Green Drive Expo for two new hybrid vehicles, the Prius v and Prius Plug-in.

Since 1997 to present day, the Prius has been the dominant leader in hybrid technology worldwide. In the U.S. alone, the Prius has sold more than one million units since 2000. The all new Prius v and Prius Plug-in are the two newest hybrid vehicles to help make up the Prius Family. A fourth new member, the city-friendly Prius c, will launch in 2012.

Prius v The first new member of the Prius Family, the Prius v , will meet the needs of
growing families with active lifestyles while providing the same attributes traditionally
found in the Prius DNA including Toyota's Hybrid Synergy Drive. The Prius v will
provide 58 percent more cargo space than the Prius Liftback, and at 34.3 cubic feet, it
has more cargo room than 80 percent of the small SUVs on the road today. Despite the
spaciousness of a family friendly midsize vehicle, the Prius v will deliver estimated EPA
fuel economy ratings of 44 mpg city, 40 mpg highway and 42 mpg combined, the highest
fuel efficiency of any crossover, SUV or wagon on the market.

The Prius v will have three configurations to help provide an easy ordering process, the value-driven Prius v Two, the well-equipped Three, and the premium level Five. All Prius v models come equipped with a wealth of standard comfort and convenience features including a new 6.1-inch Display Audio system with integrated backup camera, Bluetooth® and USB port, 16-inch alloy wheels with wheel covers, single-dial climate control, EV/ECO/Power modes, driver door Smart Key System, instrument panel with driver feedback displays, Toyota's Star Safety SystemTM [which includes the Anti-lock Braking System (ABS), Electronic Brake-force Distribution (EBD), Brake Assist (BA), Enhanced Vehicle Stability Control (VSC), Traction Control (TRAC) and Smart Stop Technology] with power lumbar support and much more.

Prius Plug-in
The third member of the Prius Family, the first-ever Prius Plug-in Hybrid, combines the benefits of the third-generation Prius Liftback's Hybrid Syndergy Drive with extended electric vehicle (EV) range, in a package that is priced more competitively than any plug-in hybrid or pure EV on the market. It will feature a new Lithium-ion battery, which supplements the superior fuel economy of the Prius with an extended electric-only driving range of up to 15 miles at a maximum speed of 62 mile-per-hour. By Toyota estimates, it will deliver an estimated 87 MPGe (miles per gallon equivalent) and when operating in hybrid mode will achieve an estimated 49 MPG3, providing drivers with great fuel economy without range anxiety. The Prius Plug-in also offers convenient charging times of only 2.5-3 hours using a standard 120V outlet or 1.5 hours using 240V.

The Prius Plug-in will share many of the same exterior and interior design elements as the 2012 Prius Liftback. Design features exclusive to the Plug-in include unique chrome grille and bumper trim, chrome door handles, unique 15-inch alloy wheels, blue-accented headlamps, a distinct tail lamp design, and a new Hybrid Synergy Drive Plug-in badge.

Prius Plug-in Hybrid will be available in two models, the Prius Plug-in and the Prius Plug-in Advanced. The Prius Plug-in Hybrid model comes equipped with an abundance of standard features including heated front seats, Remote Air Conditioning System (which can run either off the grid while the vehicle is plugged in or off the battery like the third-generation Prius Liftback), a charger timer, EV/ECO/POWER modes, three- door Smart Key, Display Audio with Navigation and Entune1 and an integrated backup camera, LED Daytime Running Lights, 15-inch 10-spoke alloy wheels, enhanced Multi-


The Prius v Three adds standard Display Audio with Navigation and the Entune1TM multimedia system (includes SiriusXMTM Satellite Radio with 90-day trial subscription, HD Radio® with iTunes® Tagging and text-to-speech with programmed and customizable test responses).
In addition to standard features on the Prius v Two and Three, the Prius v Five adds standard SofTex-trimmed seats, heated front seats, three-door Smart Key, 17-inch alloy wheels, LED headlamps, fog lamps and more.

The base MSRP for the Prius v are $26,400 for the Prius v Two model, $27,165
for the Prius v Three, and $29,990 for the Prius v Five. The Prius v will arrive at Toyota
dealerships in late October.

2012 PRIUS FAMILY PRICING
The Prius Plug-in Advanced model adds additional standard features including Premium HDD Navigation with Entune2 and JBL® GreenEdgeTM, Plug-in Hybrid Applications through a user's smartphone (Charge Management, Remote Air Conditioning System, Charging Station Map, Vehicle Finder and Eco Dashboard), Head- up Display, Dynamic Radar Cruise Control, Pre-Collision System, LED headlamps with auto on/off feature and integrated fog lamps, SofTex-trimmed seating, an eight-way power adjustable driver's seat, Safety Connect and more.

The base MSRP for the Prius Plug-in Hybrid is $32,000. The Prius Plug-in Hybrid Advanced will have an MSRP of $39,525. Both Prius Plug-in models are expected to qualify for a federal tax credit of approximately $2,500.

The Prius Plug-in Hybrid will be on sale in 14 launch states beginning this October through Toyota's Online Order System at www.toyota.com. Vehicle deliveries begin in Spring 2012. The launch states include California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Maryland, and Virginia. A national rollout is planned for 2013.

The MSRP for the 2012 Prius v and Prius Plug-in does not include the delivery, processing and handling (DPH) fee of $760. The DPH fee for vehicles distributed by Southeast Toyota (SET) and Gulf States Toyota (GST) may vary.

Leviton Level 2 (240V) Home Charging Stations
Leviton, an approved provider of Level 2 (240V) home charging stations, has developed a residential program exclusively tailored for Prius Plug-in customers. The program will include the following:

• A one-stop solution for home charging stations, installation services for 120V and 240V applications, and dedicated support for Toyota customers;
• Level 2 (240V) 16-amp and 30-amp home charging stations designed exclusively for the Prius Plug-in (UL-certified, compact design, easy-to-use, and made in the U.S.A.);
• Industry-leading pricing for Level 2 (240V) with basic packages starting as low as $999;
• Toyota-dedicated e-commerce web portal (leviton.com/Toyota) with product information, order tracking, and other features.

Prius Plug-in customers will be able to take advantage of Leviton's special pricing beginning in early October.


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  • 96 Comments
      Fgergergrergr
      • 3 Years Ago
      15 Miles EV Range 87 MPGe (CS); 49 MPG in Hybrid mode (all just est. by Toyota NOT EPA numbers) $32,000 Prius Plug-in base; $39,525 for Prius Plug-In Advanced Should qualify for $2,500 federal tax credit.
      Mark_H
      • 3 Years Ago
      Seems a bit steep, but in a world where the average new vehicle price is around $29K, I believe, it's not that big a deal.
      nsxrules
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is the last nail on the "already a failure" Volt. $10K less than the Volt with better looks, more efficiecy, larger interior, etc. etc. Kudos to Toyota!
        Renaurd
        • 3 Years Ago
        @nsxrules
        This is the last nail in nothing, they will likely sell few with a 14 mile charge and a premium sticker.
          MANARC100
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          hate to break it to you guys but its not 10k less than the volt. Its 4k less and looks dorky.
          nsxrules
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          $42K -$32K is $10K (the government $7500 Volt bailout won't last forever). But by your game it's still $5K less as the Prius also gets a $2500 tax funded bailout.
          X-Man
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          I'm a gen II Prius owner and it's the best car I've ever had and I've had both American and Japanese cars. I really like the Volt, but the price is too steep and it's a no sale when I found out that the Volt only uses Premium gasoline. All Priuses use Regular. That's a huge difference in operating costs over the life of the vehicle. Higher price price and operating costs of the Volt will doom it compared to Prius.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          [blocked]
          axiomatik
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          The $7500 credit won't last forever, but the law states it will last for the first 250k Volts. It will be available for the foreseeable future.
          Tagbert
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Renaurd
          And the Prius gets only 1/3 the electric range of the Volt.
        MTN RANGER
        • 3 Years Ago
        @nsxrules
        Similarly specced PIP and Volt will be roughly the same price after Federal tax credit.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        MANARC100
        • 3 Years Ago
        I agree completely. For the extra money the volt offers a lot more plus it looks great.
        • 3 Years Ago
        [blocked]
      stclair5211
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's sad we have taken something fun like owning a car and boiled it down to a math problem because fuel and emissions have replaced handling and fun to drive. It's now a boring appliance. You've got too many government regulations and fuel prices insanely high because you believe global warming is caused by man and not the sun which CERN proved is the cause NOT man. Thank you liberals for this great new world. Hope and change.
        2 Wheeled Menace
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stclair5211
        Yes, it's all liberals' faults. Has nothing to do with science and exponential problems with population / resources.
        airchompers
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stclair5211
        This is the market deciding. Don't want a prius? Don't get hone. Want a fun to drive car? Go buy one. Just don't deride the mathematics of owning a car and complain to us about the cost of owning one. It costs what it costs. If it's not worth it, don't get it.
        Mark_H
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stclair5211
        Or, oil costs what it costs (not expensive, in my view), due to demand. Dunno. Some people are interested in new technologies.
        masteraq
        • 3 Years Ago
        @stclair5211
        If handling, acceleration, and fun to drive are the criteria, the Chevy Volt should win handily over the Prius. And lose handily to the Fisker and Tesla. So basically the government funded vehicles are the ones that are sporty and fun to drive.
      • 3 Years Ago
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        graphikzking
        • 3 Years Ago
        anyone know if the feature content is the same? Maybe the LCD screen is mandatory on this new one to see all the battery information? I know they dropped the full color LCD display in the 2010 prius that was standard on all 2004-2009 prius'. I'd like to see if they have any included features on it that aren't with the base prius so we can get an accurate comparison.
          Dest
          • 3 Years Ago
          @graphikzking
          From a quick glance at the included features, I think the main difference is that it will come standard with a 6.1" touch-screen with Entune, backup camera, Sirius sat radio, etc. In the regular Prius you need to get the Prius 3 + option package to get that.
        Autoblogist
        • 3 Years Ago
        Agreed,the price is a big jump, but it's not as simple as stuffing a bigger battery and attaching an outlet.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Autoblogist
          [blocked]
      George Parrott
      • 3 Years Ago
      We have owned both the 2004 and 2006 Prius and 2007 Camry Hybrid. I am totally disappointed with Toyota's engineering of the "plug-in Prius. It just doesn't have a big enough battery to really run "clean" or either of our commutes, nor would it be battery powered after the 3rd mile of our 10-12 mile commutes, as then we must be on the freeway and keeping up. And YIKES relative to the pricing...This is way too expensive, IMHO, compared to the Leaf and the Volt, much less the Mitsubishi 'i" Toyota....you could have done SO MUCH better.
        sstowes
        • 3 Years Ago
        @George Parrott
        First, I must say I am not at all a Prius fan. At all. With that out of the way, I cannot say whether this generation of the Prius was ever designed for Plug-In duty for certain or not, but we know the Volt was. We also know the Leaf was designed from a clean sheet as an EV and the Mitsu "i" was always designed to have the MiEV compliment it. While I see where you're coming from, I think it's really just a case of taking what made the most sense in the current lineup (the Prius' is already designed for max efficiency given a set of practical parameters) and giving the public yet another alternative. A larger battery would have not only cost more, but would have also been larger and taken up a bit more space than I think the engineers wanted to take up. This vehicle has to remain practical, which if you've been in a Volt, it probably does slightly better. The Prius is a larger vehicle, so the Volt, riding on a smaller platform, feels a bit cramped for passengers. Or at least it did during our test drive. All things considered though, I do agree on the pricing. That's a bit of a stretch. And if one were to purchase a fully loaded vehicle, I'd easily pick the Volt for about the exact same price. I do more city driving.
          X-Man
          • 3 Years Ago
          @sstowes
          Volt uses Premium gas, Prius does not. Over the life of the car, that can add up. Any differences on insurance premiums?
        • 3 Years Ago
        @George Parrott
        [blocked]
        MTN RANGER
        • 3 Years Ago
        @George Parrott
        Totally agree.
      Kimosen
      • 3 Years Ago
      So, after tax credits, the fully loaded Prius and Volt are the same price. Prius has better hybrid fuel economy, Volt has better electric-only range. Should be interesting.
        Dest
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Kimosen
        The Prius has better interior space, likely better reliability, and it doesn't rely on a temporary $7,500 federal government tax credit to be price competitive.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 3 Years Ago
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          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
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          NissanGTR
          • 3 Years Ago
          I dont want aids or become a murder victim or deal with hearing obnoxious minorities or the occasional white trash. Ill own a car regardless of place.
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
          • 3 Years Ago
          [blocked]
        axiomatik
        • 3 Years Ago
        I've rented a 2nd-gen Prius. You can't keep the gas engine from kicking in. The threshold is just too low. I tried and tried and tried, but you can't reasonably accelerate in traffic in electric-only.
          axiomatik
          • 3 Years Ago
          @axiomatik
          When Car & Driver tested a prototype plug-in Prius, they said it is still hard to keep the gas-engine off. Granted, it was a prototype, not a production model, but I'm willing to bet that is the case with the production model as well. Toyota has a very different take on the operation than Gm with the Volt. http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/car/10q2/2012_toyota_prius_plug-in_hybrid-first_drive_review "Like a regular Prius, though, the PHV will fire up its internal-combustion engine if you’re not careful. The PHV’s threshold is slightly higher than the regular car’s, but anything more than genteel pressure on the go pedal—say, as might be required to enter the freeway or accelerate up a slight hill—and the 98-hp, 1.8-liter four-cylinder stirs with a decidedly unsexy moan."
          Tagbert
          • 3 Years Ago
          @axiomatik
          On the regular hybrid Prius, the electric engine is mainly to give the relatively weak gas engine a boost when it needs it. It only operates in electric-only mode at very low speeds like parking lots. You would need plug-in hybrid like the one in this article to be able to drive electric-only and even this one will only do it at less than highway speeds and for only 15 miles, max.
      Andre Neves
      • 3 Years Ago
      "with the top-of-the-line Prius Plug-in Hybrid Advanced jumping all the way up to $39,525" Uh...this is for those folks who want to save money on fuel right? I find "saving money" a bit far-fetched when spending $40K on a Toyota econobox.
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      NooOOoOoO... $10k extra for ~14.5 miles of electric range is not going to sell this car. I am no longer rooting for this car.
        Quentin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        As far as I can tell, it is spec'd like a Prius Four, which stickers for $27,300. That makes it about $2,500 more expensive after tax credit.
      CarCrazy24
      • 3 Years Ago
      It's about $32,000 too much...this is hardly even a worthy competitor of the Volt.
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