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2011 Kia Optima Hybrid
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Hypermiler extraordinaire Wayne Gerdes and his colleague Chris Bernius have set a new Guinness World Record for the lowest fuel consumption in a gasoline hybrid vehicle while driving through the 48 adjoining U.S. states. At over 64 miles per gallon, Gerdes, Bernius and the 2011 Kia Optima Hybrid have found a home in Guinness' record books.

The lightfooted duo piloted a bone-stock 2011 Kia Optima Hybrid along a 7,899-mile route across America and achieved an average fuel consumption of 64.55 mpg, crushing the vehicle's official EPA highway rating of 40 mpg (highway).

Kia's 48-state challenge was completed in 14 days, with the Optima Hybrid averaging 564 miles a day and consuming just over 5.5 tanks of gasoline. Crunch those numbers and you'll discover the Optima Hybrid averaged 1,418 miles between fill-ups. That, right there, is what hypermiling is all about.

The record attempt was verified by Philip Robertson, Adjudicator at Guinness World Records, who presented Gerdes and Bernius with their certificate at an official ceremony at Kia Motors' manufacturing facility in West Point, GA yesterday.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 32 Comments
      Bryan Lund
      • 3 Years Ago
      Aaron Schwarz-a hanging chad. Man, I thought that phrase was dead and long gone for sure by now. Take that Prius up to Skagit County...there's lots of room for hypermilin' it up there. Head over to Anacortes and Whidbey Island and enjoy going over the Deception Pass bridge. Then, the Blue Fox Drive-In south of Oak Harbor not only plays movies but has a go-kart course set up. Hypermiling your go-kart, is that fair game, too? Whoo-hoo!
      Rich M
      • 3 Years Ago
      You can't clear 564 miles a day @64 MPG by driving slowly... You do it by driving intelligently.
        Aaron Schwarz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rich M
        It was done with 2 drivers however, and we have no idea how many hours per day they were driving, especially if they were alternating between driver/ sleeper to get in 16 hours of driving at an average rate of 35MPG, and it is a well known fact that the most popular production hybrid gets phenomenal fuel economy if pulse and glided between 30 and 40 MPH. Gerdes is no foreigner to advanced hypermiling techniques, and I image they required two drivers to do this for a reason, safe operator time advantage with two drivers!
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      not green at all.
      Marco Polo
      • 3 Years Ago
      ......There y' go again..!
      Aaron Schwarz
      • 3 Years Ago
      Well done! Stuff that up the imported oil externalities, hidden costs, obvious costs, lifestyle/ lifequality costs of smog, cancer, brain damage, heartdisease, noise and light pollution, runoff pollution, urban heat island effects, ect..... flaring column.
        throwback
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Aaron Schwarz
        If everyone drove like you suggest, you would not be able to extoll your mental superiority over the rest of us.
        Letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Aaron Schwarz
        LOL Aaron. You've inspired me to put a "Hypermiler Pace Vehicle" sign on my bicycle when I'm riding downtown... I can go a consistent 15mph, and make better time than the cars that zoom up to 35mph and then have to brake.
          Aaron Schwarz
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Letstakeawalk
          Thats the thing, I used my bicycle too, unlike most Americans, and actually learned the wave cancel technique from long haul truck drivers when I was a teenage way back when before I even knew what a standing wave was.... Careful with stickers and signs, they tend to provoke action from radical unstable people that are frustrated. Political statements or signs of any type on any vehicle can evoke trouble from unsavory types. Marco suggests that frame my arguments in a moralized context, when my objective is to share fact and ideas related to the post. Wave canceling and hypermiling are related topics. Glad to hear that you commute with a bicycle as well. On that front, I am moving to using an electrically assisted bicycle to replace my prius for many transportation situations that were previously too time consuming and straining for the unassisted bicycle (whenever prodeco gets around to sending me the Phantom X- back ordered- production delay issues)... People can throw hatred at me one way or the other on these discussion threads, but I frankly dont care what they say. They can comment on the discussion topics, as personally attacking me with their words only paint a picture of the type of person who is leaving the hate filled comments. Go ahead and down rank this one too trolls~
        Aaron Schwarz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Aaron Schwarz
        I see standing waves in traffic, stop---speed up----slow down----stop, when the intelectual giants I am commuting with could wave cancel by just slowly rolling along at 4, 5, 6,7,8,9,10,11 ect steady state miles per hour and lay off their gas and break pedals (for automatics) (leave it in 1st/2n or whatever), but they are too intelligent and patient to engage in smart wave canceling... let alone to try and hypermile... Great Work Americans!
      2 Wheeled Menace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Ahhhhh... that's double than what i get in my 4 banger Nissan ( low 30mpg figure ).
        Aaron Schwarz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @2 Wheeled Menace
        I jam between 42 and 53MPG's out of my moderately well equipped 2005 Prius: lifetime average 46.4 near Seattle Wa (lots of hills). 42MPG's if I get on the throttle heavy and dust people off the line (295ft lbs of torque- said what), and roll at +3MPH over the speed limit in the winter. In the Summer I can milk it for 53MPG's on a tank if I do some gentle hypermiling in warmer weather. I know that many people who live in flat areas can milk a Gen II Prius for 60+, hills just flog the fuel economy, energy vampire topography.....
      emperor koku
      • 3 Years Ago
      Has no one tried it in a Prius? Seriously?
      superduckz
      • 3 Years Ago
      You'd LOVE Florida. Flat, warm and not even that much wind.
      Julius
      • 3 Years Ago
      Interesting result, though I wonder if there's a practical limit to long-distance hypermiling, especially as the Cruze Eco got only 0.15 mpg less of an average... (http://green.autoblog.com/2011/08/25/2012-chevy-cruze-eco-gets-64-4-mpg-in-48-state-9-564-mile-drive/) ... so I wonder what a Prius would do with this, and if it would really be significantly better.
        Julius
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Julius
        And for what it's worth, this is still 3.35 mpg less than what was done with a Jetta TDI: http://green.autoblog.com/2009/08/23/helen-and-john-taylor-reset-fuel-mileage-world-record-at-67-9-mp/ (though with the higher carbon-content of diesel, it might be an overall CO2 wash)
      Aaron Schwarz
      • 3 Years Ago
      It is the tropical storms, hurricanes, flooding, lightning and retired people in Florida that worry me... Who knows, a hanging chad might fly out of no where obstructing my view of the road :P ....
      SpeedyRacer
      • 3 Years Ago
      I am all for hypermiling and am a hypermiler myself. What I want to know is how this guy did it and was it safe? Was he following semis from 2 feet behind? Was he driving 30mph below posted limits? I used to get over 38mpg in my Sentra before trading it for a LEAF and had to tread a fine line between being slow and smooth and being safe and courteous. Getting the kind of numbers he posts requires doing some extraordinary things.... most likely dangerous on public roads.
        superduckz
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SpeedyRacer
        Very good questions. I wondered the same thing. Was he a hazard on the highway while he accomplished this? I suppose you could calculate his average mph if they gave enough info.
      Jelly
      • 3 Years Ago
      Diesel hybrids are a coming in Europe. VW XL1 - Plug-In Diesel Hybrid Range 261 mpg, the way to go (no hyper milling required).
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