Back in April, Mitsubishi made a huge deal about the comparatively low price of its all-electric i: $27,990 (which drops to $20,490 after the $7,500 tax credit is applied) for the base ES version. The SE and SE Premium were $2,000 and $4,790 more, respectively, and all those prices need another $720 destination charges tacked on. At the time, Mitsubishi spokesman Maurice Durand told AutoblogGreen that the company had tried to get the after-tax credit price of the entry-level ES under $19,990, but that the Japanese earthquake prevented this.

Well, we can now scrap all those numbers. This morning, Mitsubishi said that "unforeseen changes in market conditions" have driven up the price of all i models by $1,135. This means the before tax-credit MSRP numbers are:
  • ES: $29,125 ($21,625 after tax credit)
  • SE: $31,125 ($23,625 after tax credit)
  • SE with Premium package: $33,915 ($26,415 after tax credit)
Now, Mitsubishi says – correctly – that this still puts the i at the bottom of the cost chart for all-electric vehicles in the U.S., but it's not as low as it once was. Will the extra grand change your buying decision? You can spec out an i here, and note that if you go top-of-the-line with the i and add in $150 for cold package, you find yourself with an i that costs $34,065. Compare this to a Nissan Leaf with the standard cold weather package at $35,200.

We're keen to find out what the "unforeseen changes" were, and if we get word from Mitsu about this, we'll let you know.
Show full PR text
Mitsubishi Motors Announces Price Adjustment to the 2012 Mitsubishi i 100% Electric Vehicle

CYPRESS, Calif., Sept. 9, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Due to unforeseen changes in market conditions, Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc., (MMNA) has decided to make a pricing adjustment of $1135 to the 2012 Mitsubishi i 100% electric-powered vehicle.

The well-equipped entry-level Mitsubishi i ES model will see its net value change to $21,625*, while the premium-grade SE version of the electric vehicle will have a new net value price of $23,625*.

Despite the pricing adjustment, the 2012 Mitsubishi i remains the most affordably-priced mass-market electric car available in the marketplace today.

The pricing adjustment applies only to the suggested MSRP pricing of the vehicle. The value-oriented pricing of options such as the Cold Zone package ($150) that consists of a main lithium-ion battery warming system and heated outside mirrors and the Premium package ($2790) that includes HDD navigation system with rear camera, FUSE Handsfree Link System™ with USB port, steering wheel-mounted audio controls, and a DC quick charging port remain unaffected.

* ES $29,125 MSRP less $7500 federal tax credit = $21,625 after tax credit; SE $31,125 MSRP less $7500 federal tax credit = $23,625 after tax credit

About Mitsubishi Motors Corporation

Mitsubishi Motors North America, Inc., (MMNA) is responsible for all manufacturing, finance, sales, marketing, research and development operations for Mitsubishi Motors in the United States. MMNA sells coupes, convertibles, sedans and sport utility vehicles through a network of approximately 400 dealers. In November of 2011, MMNA will launch the battery-powered electric vehicle Mitsubishi i as part of a corporate mission to offer consumers more environmentally responsible modes of transportation. This battery-powered electric vehicle technology addresses the need for vehicles that produce zero tailpipe emissions and support a growing agenda for sustainability. For more information, contact the Mitsubishi Motors News Bureau at (888) 560-6672 or visit media.mitsubishicars.com.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 29 Comments
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      Are these available for sale now? A 16KWH battery seems too small for a pure electric unless you go with an Aptera-type hyper-efficient design.
        Michael Walsh
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Demo units at dealers in November. Customer cars available for delivery after the first of the year. FYI, I get to drive the US spec car at the end of this month. Watch for my review on both mynissanleaf.com and myimiev.com!
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        I'm not sure of the model numbers, but Mitsubishi are also doing a version with a 10kwh Toshiba SCiB battery, which is supposed to give nearly as good range presumably due to a very high SOC.
          • 5 Hours Ago
          Let us know what the deal is. It is all as clear as mud.
          sdtofudog
          • 5 Hours Ago
          I have a deposit on the Mitsubishi iMiev and am also wondering whether the advanced Toshiba SCiB battery will be standard on first-run U.S. cars, as press releases have seemed to promise. Mitsubishi's website is extremely weak on iMiev information, and calling their toll-free number was equally disappointing. Their in-house call agent had no clue, and promised me a callback with 48 hours.
        porosavuporo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        These have been on sale worldwide for a while now, and their reported total sales numbers are over 10K units.
      • 3 Years Ago
      33K (or 26K after looting the rest of your grandchildren), and I get this puny roller-skate? What in the world is going on if there's a market for this? We must be nuts.
        Smith Jim
        • 5 Hours Ago
        Right wingers are constantly saying we should let taxpayers keep more of their hard earned money. The tax credit for EVs keeps more money in the taxpayer's wallet.
      Jack Lifton
      • 3 Years Ago
      David, In answer to your question I think it is under-appreciated that the ICE car uses as much or more rare earth permanent magnet based motors and generators and sensors than do the hybrids and EVs. This is because the public and most pundits do not realize that the nickel metal hydride battery, which for 1.5 kWh output in a Prius uses 2.3 KG of lanthanum, is a recent and limited use of rare earth in vehicles whereas rare earth permanent magnets were developed specifically for use in the OEM automotive industry and have today essentially replaced all iron based permanent magnets in the OEM automotive industry. Rare earth permanent magnet usage has been growing and the coverage (percent of use as a fraction of all magnets) has reached more than 80% in all industrial and commercial uses. The increases in the price of neodymium and dysprosium over the last 18 months have been more than 1000%! I am warning the RA mining/refining industry that it is going to drive the OEM automotive industry back to induction motors if the prices do not correct and rationalize very soon. Unfortunately the stock promoters and the speculators seem to care little for the little guy. There can be too much of a good thing.
        • 5 Hours Ago
        @Jack Lifton
        Many thanks.
      EV Now
      • 3 Years Ago
      Price increase by Nissan (again mainly to partially offset the huge Yen appreciation) - that is the unforeseen change.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @EV Now
        The factories built for EV's in the US and UK should partially alleviate this effect, as well as the Renault factories in Europe. I don't know how many of the parts will still be Japanese sourced though. Japan is a terrible place to build cars now, with a high yen and limited power.
      winc06
      • 3 Years Ago
      Maybe it is because I saw the iMIEV at a couple of autoshows, even though it is kind of cute in pictures, it is all cheapness and tackiness in person reminding me of the dreadful postwar toys with made in Japan on them. It strikes me now that if you lined up the other cars you could buy with the same amount of money next to it, no one would be tempted. Even a Nissan Versa looks like a Rolls next to this thing. It has nothing going for it and if the EV execution is on the same level as the rest of the car it will be a total embarrassment to own. Mitsu needs to scrap it now and put its replacement into production immediately.
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @winc06
        that's not quite true. it's a nice enough car just small. and they could easily continue production just at a cost based price. say 16k$ for starters
      mchlrus1
      • 3 Years Ago
      It looks like a Tata Nano. Only difference is the "i" has four bolts on the wheels instead of Tata's three.
      Michael Walsh
      • 3 Years Ago
      ¥ vs. $. Has to be.
      Jack Lifton
      • 3 Years Ago
      The cause was probably the price of neodymium-iron-boron rare earth permanent magnet alloy. Rare earth permanent magnets are used not only in the electric motors that power the auxiliary and options on the car such as power seats, power windows, electric aspects of air conditioning, and the large electric drive motor, but also in the electric power steering and many of the real time data sensors. 18 months ago a kg of neodymium-iron-boron maget alloy was selling to the magnet constructor for $50. Last week the price for the same material was more than $400/kg. When you add manufacturing and magnetizing costs and (drum roll) the cost of adding dysprosium to the alloy for some critical under the hood applications the price can go well beyond $500/kg for the fabricated alloy before it has been turned into an end-use product. Thus a total cost of $50-$100 has now become $500 - $1000. Any questions? Note: I am considered an expert in rare earths markets and future use trends. I spoke at the SAE I seminar on Hybrid and Electric Vehicles last March in Inianapolis. The assigned topic was "Will the price increases for the rare earths affect their future use in OEM global automotive?" I am speaking again oin this topic for the SAE I in Shanghai on November 15, and at the SAE World Congress in Detroit next April 25, where i will moderate an industry panel on this and related topics.
        • 5 Hours Ago
        @Jack Lifton
        Good to see you here Jack, and thanks for your insights. Any thoughts on how the increase for pure electric vehicles due to rare earths compare with that for hybrids and even plain ICE cars? Many of the items you mention are used in those too.
      SpeedyRacer
      • 3 Years Ago
      I would like to know what is included for that price. Does it have navigation, telematics, satellite radio, heated seats, and room for five like the LEAF? The i is essentially a kei-car that's been tweaked for the US market. When I drove one a couple of years ago at the LA auto show it lacked quality and I would not have felt safe taking it on a freeway with its cardboard thin doors and tiny size.
        David H Dennis
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SpeedyRacer
        I went on the web site, and it turns out you need to get the most expensive trim level to even order the navigation option. I couldn't find a price for the navigation on the web site, Leaf is about $36,000 and this is about $31,000 for the high trim option. Other than an upgraded stereo, the high trim option is surprisingly low on content, while the Leaf's has some fantastic goodies (rear view camera, solar accessory operation, etc). To make matters worse, the Mitsubishi has an 85 mile range to the Leaf's 100. Overall, the Mitsubishi just doesn't offer the value the Leaf does - I would unhesitatingly pay the 10% price premium for the Leaf for a far superior car. D
        Spec
        • 3 Years Ago
        @SpeedyRacer
        Well click on the link he provided: http://i.mitsubishicars.com/build-yours I agree that it is a bit underwhelming of an EV. But at least they have something on the market.
      Bryan Lund
      • 3 Years Ago
      Mitsubishi is your best bet for any and all New World Order automotive needs. They build quality products and stand behind them. They put GM to shame, car freaks. Just rockin' solid truth.
      • 3 Years Ago
      According to some who have pre-ordeerd the i-Miev already, the price increase doesn't apply to those who have already registered with their refundable $99 deposit, as long as they finalize their order before October 18th, 2011. See here for the email Mitsubishi sent: http://myimiev.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=111
      • 3 Years Ago
      No mystery. In April a dollar bought you 83 yen, not it buys 77 yen. That's a 7% change. They've done well to keep the price increase to about 4%.
    • Load More Comments