The Detroit News is reporting that Fiat may move its planned Jeep and Alfa Romeo SUV production from Turin to the United States. That would leave the Italian plant open and available to produce a new future city car.
According to an unnamed source close to the situation, the decision is based largely on the fact that the Euro has made substantial gains against the dollar in the past few months. A little less than a year ago, Fiat announced that it would invest $1.44 billion in the Turin facility in order to produce Jeep and Alfa Romeo SUVs beginning in late 2012, but since then, the Euro has gained nearly 9 percent against the dollar.

Needless to say, that makes the possibility of manufacturing Jeep vehicles abroad and importing them back into the U.S. considerably less profitable. Building the two vehicles here in America would keep Jeep assembly domestic and give Alfa Romeo a leg up when it comes time for that brand to re-launch in the land of the free.


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  • 19 Comments
      schultzkenneth
      • 4 Years Ago
      I'm not that big of a Chrysler fan, but i gotta admit..Since Fiat took them over, i really like what they have been doing.
        Bill Burke
        • 4 Years Ago
        @schultzkenneth
        Room for more fans. Welcome to the satisfied Chrysler fan base !
      MAX
      • 4 Years Ago
      FIAT is going to become Super Chrysler LLC. Why fight it out for 6th place in Europe when you beat Toyota for 3rd place in the USA?
        • 4 Years Ago
        @MAX
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          Robert
          • 4 Years Ago
          What do you mean done? Not hardly. Here is what has recently come out (within the last month), is coming being released at the Frankfurt auto show in a week and over the next 8 months: 1. Wrangler production with new Pentastar V6 and 5sp. transmission. because of this one change Jeep got 30,000 orders. Production is already sold out for next two months. 2. Masarati SUV based off Grand Cherokee is set to be introduced at the Frankfurt auto show in less than two weeks 3. Chrysler will be releasing the new 8 speed transmission. You better believe they will market the hell out of this and the increases in fuel economy it will result in for their cars. Along with the new trans the Tiger Shark 4cylinder engine using Fiat's Multiair system will debut. It will be placed in a number of cars including the new small Dodge coming in January. See below. 4. The full line of Chrysler 300s will be released including the S models and executives. 5. More Fiat dealers will be open resulting in increased 500 sales which were only less than 100 behind Mini last month. 6. Viper to be released within the next 8 months. Replacement for Journey and 200/Avenger within the next 8 months. All will be seen in summer of 2012 as 2013 models. 7. Lastly and most importantly Dodge will be releasing their new small car at the Detroit Autoshow in January. It will be based off of the CUSW platform. It will be a legitimate contender against the Cruze and Focus.
          billfrombuckhead
          • 4 Years Ago
          Chrysler has a new Alfa based compact on the way to destroy whalekiller compacts. If the rest of Toyopets new cars are like the hideous new Camry and the new Honda Civic, I can't wait
          Não Pirilamparás
          • 4 Years Ago
          @ billfrombuckhead "whalekiller compacts"? That's genius!
      Redline
      • 4 Years Ago
      Why do they have to have a Alfa SUV? Why not just make Jeep SUV's? ALFA is going downhill IMO. No more RWD, where are the GTA models? *cries like a girl remembering the Alfetta GTV6*
        Não Pirilamparás
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Redline
        Alfa Romeo needs to build a successful range of high volume models first before being able to afford producing "niche" variants.
        Elmo
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Redline
        No more RWD? Then what is the 4C?
      jbm0866
      • 4 Years Ago
      I am kinda excited for the return of Alfa to the U.S., but not as an SUV.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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      quuppa70
      • 4 Years Ago
      why is FIat (Automobiles) logo used here, should be Fiat Group logo..
      Bill Burke
      • 4 Years Ago
      Certainly I'd perfer to see this Jeep built in the US and the Italian labor situation makes the venture potentially too risky for such an important vehicle for Jeep. The Jeep brand has so much potential, both domestically and internationally, that Chrysler/Fiat has to capitalize on that potential fully. Jeep still has the opportunity to increase it's line-up with two Fiat based smaller crossover models and a potential super utility Jeep off a current Spanish built Hummer replacement at the other end of it's market. That should more than satisfy the "international" mix of the product and frankly make domestic manufacture more attractive. With so many Chrysler products succeeding in todays market, Fiat has to keep the new product flowing and the US is still the best bet for quality labor and a stable workforce. The Italian unions should take a good hard look at reality or all their jobs will be going to Poland and Brazil as well as Mexico and America. Wake up!
        Eu_Driver
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Not much to say, but... I'm really VERY ANGRY. In Turin, the old "hometown", the long-time-promised Fiat investment in its "mother"-plant Mirafiori will be scaled down... If not entirely cancelled, I suspect at this point. How could the biggest historical (old) Fiat plant be used only (in a profitable way) to produce a very small city car (the so called "Topolino", even smaller than 500)??? The story of the past -few-months-Euro-gains-against-Dollar seems to me no more than a pretext (today the situation is rapidly changing, due to the South European countries sovereign debt crisis). It's likely that in a near future Portugal, Italy, Greece, and Spain (the P.I.G.S., as the "nice" britons nicknamed them) will revert to their old national currencies or will receive a new "common" south european currency, the so called euro-soft/euro-south, very likely "prone" to inflation (a crude but effective tool to reduce debt and costs for goverments and firms). Marchionne probably "feels" better in Detroit and Ontario, but definitely losing the European (an especially Italian) "minds and hearths" it's not a smart move, for a wanna-be global player... or does he want to be remembered as the Italian counterpart of Roger Smith?
        Anders
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Bill Burke
        Best bet for quality labor? What part of the US? Italians are probably less stable, but there are better places in Europe that beat both the US and Italy. From Poland to the Czech Republic.
      • 3 Years Ago
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      • 3 Years Ago
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