Ford embraced the social media movement early on, and it proved a successful tactic ahead of the launch of its then all-new Fiesta. The automaker is once again taking to Facebook and Twitter, this time to keep hatchback fans in the loop of the production progress of the upcoming Ford Focus ST. Key folks involved in the development of the hot hatch are putting together video updates, which will then be offered up exclusively to the vehicles Facebook fans and Twitter followers.

Over 300,000 Facebook users have signed on to get updates on the car so far.

The first video shows Jost Capito, Ford's director of global performance vehicles and motorsport business development, behind the wheel of a Focus ST as it takes on various driving conditions at the automaker's Lommel test facility in Belgium. Click past the jump to see Capito explain his testing, and how the Lommel facility mimics roads from around the world. Also, head over to Facebook.com/FordFocus if you want to become a fan of the upcoming ST.


Show full PR text
Facebook Fans to Get Exclusive Progress Reports on New Ford Focus ST

• Exclusive video and photography of the all-new Ford Focus ST to be shared first
on the Focus Facebook page, highlighting the car's technology, performance and
practicality

• Videos will give global Focus fans insights into the project from key members of
the development team, as well as previously unseen vehicle footage ahead of next
year's launch

• Online campaign will be ongoing, helping Focus Facebook fans – more than 300,000
strong – stay up to speed with the progress of Ford's first global performance car


DEARBORN, Mich., Sept. 1, 2011 – Since Ford first announced its all-new Focus ST,
performance car fans around the world have been eager to find out more. To answer this
demand, Ford will begin actively sharing both exclusive video and photography, first on the Ford
Focus Facebook page, to keep enthusiasts up to date on the development of this sporty new
model.

The materials will explore technical highlights, the driving experience and high levels of
refinement that make up the core DNA of the new Focus ST, which is expected to deliver an
estimated 247 HP/250 PS when production begins. The more than 300,000 fans of the Focus
Facebook page will be able to access newly generated and previously unseen footage of Focus
ST development cars undergoing testing, plus insights into the car's features from key members
of the Global Performance Vehicle team.

"Our Facebook page allows us to reach out to enthusiasts around the world for the first time and
share with them the final stages of development of the new Focus ST as it happens," said Jost
Capito, director of Global Performance Vehicles. "This is Ford's first truly global performance
vehicle, and social media gives us a rare opportunity to show enthusiasts how this car is
progressing, gives insight into its technologies and builds excitement in this community as we
finalize Focus ST's technical specifications."

Updates will start with a look at the specific work involved in developing a global performance
car and how the Global Performance Vehicles team has been testing Focus ST in numerous
weather conditions and over a wide variety of road surfaces.

The video clips will then explore some of the cutting-edge features of Focus ST, including
enhanced Torque Vectoring Control, the advanced Electronic Stability Program and innovations
applied to the 2.0-liter Ford EcoBoost® engine and finely tuned suspension.

As the team continues its testing regime and as Focus ST gets closer to its 2012 launch, Ford
will keep fans of the page updated, reporting from the company's proving grounds at Lommel in
Belgium, the infamous Nürburgring in Germany, from hot weather testing trips in Spain and the
United States, and from driving quality tests over twisty B-roads in the U.K.

"We are determined that the new Focus ST will meet the very high expectations of our fans
around the world," said Capito. "Focus ST will deliver on the promise of great technology,
exciting driving dynamics and high levels of refinement – making it as enjoyable to use for
everyday driving as it will be on exciting and challenging roads we performance enthusiasts
deliberately seek out.

"Our Facebook series is equally exciting," Capito added, "as it lets us connect directly for the
first time with performance and Ford enthusiasts alike, and takes them with us through the final
stages of development for the new Focus ST."

To follow the new Focus ST story and get involved in the action, visit Ford's Focus Facebook
page: www.facebook.com/fordfocus


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 44 Comments
      David Rios
      • 4 Years Ago
      more please ^.^
      JamesC
      • 4 Years Ago
      pretty boring video
      Graham Gillam
      • 4 Years Ago
      I know all the reports so far suggest the st will only be available in manual, but in the video when most turns it looks like there are paddles of some sort behind the wheel? Anyone else see this/agree? DSG transmission with paddles?
        adrive7
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Graham Gillam
        There are controls all over the new Focus steering wheel for the Sync and info systems. At the end of the video you see him shift gears and hear the accompanying change in revs. Pretty sure this is a MT.
        Dean Hammond
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Graham Gillam
        I beleive it will be available both ways, 6 speed manual and DSG....I bet the car is going to be a HOOT, cant wait....and countdown to the anti FWD comments....
          Dean Hammond
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Dean Hammond
          I could be wrong though Graham...all i know is with a 6 speed manual Im sold....
        JayP
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Graham Gillam
        Noticed that too... may be a flappy paddle but since this is a pre-prod mule it may have been the only steering wheel left on the rack when they were getting it ready.
          AM2
          • 4 Years Ago
          @JayP
          @JayP, They're most likely steering wheel mounted function controls. http://www.netcarshow.com/ford/2011-focus/1600x1200/wallpaper_32.htm If I remember correctly there are no 2012 Focus models with paddle shifters.
        gdodson
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Graham Gillam
        It could be the steering wheel off of the other Focus. At around the 50 second mark it looks like he reaches down to shift and the car rocks.
        Kris
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Graham Gillam
        Nah! This is not pedal shifters. Too low position not ergonomic for gear shifting.
      • 4 Years Ago
      [blocked]
        • 4 Years Ago
        [blocked]
        Nowuries
        • 4 Years Ago
        Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and I think the new focus looks great, especially in person. Would prefer an RS version coming to the US, but maybe in a few years.
        Elmo
        • 4 Years Ago
        Wow, True voice is exactly like Oceanblue and Laser, except he hates Ford with a passion. But just as the other 2, he hates them for retarded reasons. He even makes up his own facts in order to make the EcoBoost engines look bad.
      Tom Cottage
      • 4 Years Ago
      FWD? It's a pity this can't happen here with AWD.
        AlphaGnome
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Tom Cottage
        Why is their always a flood of complaints when a hot hatch is released without all wheel drive? You can still have a blast in a car sending its power to the front wheels... Drive a Mini, Mazdaspeed3, GTI, Cobalt SS, or Civic Si and you will see what I mean. I love a good AWD car as much as the next, but lets face it, the FWD architecture keeps the price & weight down without sacrificing the fun factor..
      Kris
      • 4 Years Ago
      I know how much effort and money they put into developing new suspension and stuff to decrease the torque steer which is good, but I can't understand why they don't use Honda's solution to the problem. If you check some pics on Honda's K20 engine in combination with the gearbox you'll see they made equal length semi axles sort off. It's genius! And it works perfectly. Did you ever seen Honda with torque steer? I'm not! Anyway. Can't wait to see how this beast is going to look and perform.
        Fazzster
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Kris
        Honda's don't have torque steer because they never any torque to begin with.
          SheldonRoss
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Fazzster
          That was exactly the first thought that popped into my head when I read this.
        ehuesmaniac
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Kris
        Honda? Really? Honda's solution is to produce cars without torque. That is not a valid solution in a turbo car. And what front wheel drive car doesn't have equal length halfshafts any more? My Mazdaspeed 3 does, but it has plenty of torque steer. Once you get used to it, I find it a non-issue. My gripe with high power FWDs is lack of traction, but if the car is set up correctly traction can be quite good. My Mazda has a ton more traction than my Sentra SpecV did.
        Elmo
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Kris
        That just shows me that you don't know how to get a car to produce torquesteer. You went to a "track day". Just because it wasn't showin torquesteer while you were driving it, doesn't mean it doesn't do it. The Civic Si is powered by the same 197hp K20 that powered the EP3 Civic Type-R. You cannot eliminate torquesteer. Torquesteer will always be a part of a high powered FWD car. You can only reduce it. You are a fanboy. You seem to think Honda eliminated torquesteer, when they didn't. Go check out Top Gear's review on the EUDM Civic Type-R. He does a launch of one and it immediately turns right (or left, can't remember. But that doesn't matter when it's still torquesteer). By the way, I never said you didn't drive them. I said i find it hard to believe you drove them and not feel torquesteer.
        theraven
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Kris
        Ford used equal length halfshafts with the SVT Focus back in 2002. It helps, but only to a point. There is a big difference between 150-175 lb/ft of torque and what the ST will probably be putting out from the ecoboost 2.0, which is likely in the ~250 lb/ft range.
        Elmo
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Kris
        That is absolute BS. I find it hard to believe you drove any of those and didn't experience torquesteer. Either that or you don't know how to get a car to torquesteer. The Civic Si I drove had plenty of it. Took my hands off the wheel, revved it to 2500, launched it. The car launched to the right. I could have turned a corner. This is with a car that has lower power than the JDM/EUDM Civic and Integra Type-Rs. You're sounding like a fanboy. Please stop.
          Kris
          • 4 Years Ago
          @Elmo
          Oh, I drove them don't you worry! Till recently I owned Honda and I went to a few Honda owners track days and we exchanged cars. Now the difference is you drove Si I drove Type R. On Type R drive shafts are totally different from any other model. I can't find picture of K20 engine and gearbox to show you that the semi axles are almost equal length. I don't know what engine the Si has, I've never seen one. Here in Europe we only have the hatch and the sedan. If it steers to the right like you said it means the right drive shaft is shorter one which means it's one of Honda's counter clockwise rotating engines. K20 used for Type R is clockwise engine and if it torque steers it should steer to the left. I have experienced torque steer on Opel Astra OPC and I know how it feels. I can't feel it on Type R though. Fanboy?! Really? LOL
        Dean Hammond
        • 4 Years Ago
        @Kris
        I think Fords answer is what is referred to as Torque vectoring, probably have some ( including myself ) questioning the absence of Fords lauded Revo Knuckle system. However, if utilizing the brakes is also regenerative then maybe its not such a bad thing.....anyways, the tests should be interesting...certainly got me curious...because tha base package is so good from the get go, this car could be pretty damn good...
      • 4 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Shomare
      • 4 Years Ago
      Current Focus owner here. Those paddles don't look like anything more than the controls for MFT. Same as on my Titanium. The Focus must be seen in person to be appreciated. it has so many subtle lines not seen in photographs. I think it's sharp and get comments all the time re what a good looking car it is. Can't wait for the ST. This video is as close to hearing the ST to date. More!
      eric
      • 4 Years Ago
      Difficult to tell for certain, but there appears to be a paddle shifter button on the back side of the steering wheel. It would be nice for those opting for the PowerShift dual-clutch automatic to have something better than a rocker switch on the shift lever.
      Greg
      • 4 Years Ago
      Interesting to see it testing with the new body, but the 18" wheels of the titanium. I've heard that the 19" wheels that were seen on the prototype will be an option, not standard.
      • 4 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      adrive7
      • 4 Years Ago
      Those aren't the seats from the concept. I need those concept seats.
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