Call it a Caravan, call it a Voyager, call it whatever you want – just don't call it a Dodge. Because while it may look exactly like a Dodge, it's actually a Ram. And as the suits in Auburn Hills will point out, the Ram truck brand is no longer under Dodge's purview.

What it's actually called is the Ram C/V, which doesn't stand for Commercial Vehicle but for Cargo Van. It's the panel-wagon version of the Dodge Grand Caravan, and it's just entered production in Windsor, Ontario.

The Class 1 commercial vehicle offers 1,800 pounds of cargo capacity and 3,600 pounds of towing capability for a Gross Combined Weight Rating of 8,750 pounds, all the while delivering up to 25 miles per gallon on the highway. It also gets a heavy-duty radiator and transmission oil cooler over the family-hauling version. It's ready to order now from your local Ram dealership.
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The First Ram C/V (Cargo Van) Rolls Off the Assembly Line at Chrysler Group LLC's Windsor Assembly Plant

AUBURN HILLS, Mich., Aug. 31, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Ram Truck Brand celebrates today as the first 2012 Ram Cargo Van rolls out of Chrysler Group LLC's Windsor (Canada) Assembly Plant. New for 2012, the Ram Cargo Van, or Ram C/V, benefits from more than 25 years of minivan engineering and the Ram Truck brand understands the versatility needs for both small and large businesses.

Ram C/V offers small businesses many competitive advantages. Among them, Ram C/V provides a Class 1 commercial vehicle-leading 1,800-lb. cargo payload and category-exclusive towing capability, up to 3,600 lbs. A 20-gallon fuel tank and 25 mpg highway also deliver best-in-class fuel range.

Ram Cargo Van features commercial-tuned ride and heavy-duty suspension offering maximum hauling capability. A heavy-duty radiator and heavy-duty transmission oil cooler help meet heavier powertrain demands. Ram C/V also is engineered with unique hydraulic power-assist rack-and-pinion steering, front anti-sway bar and rear twist-beam axle with coil springs. Ram C/V has a maximum Gross Combined Weight Rating (GCWR) of 8,750 lbs.

With standard electronic stability control (ESC), commercial load-tuned tire-pressure monitoring (TPM), four-wheel anti-lock disc brake system (ABS) and ideal command-of-the road seating, the Ram Cargo Van offers capability, comfort and convenience with great road manners.

About Windsor Assembly Plant

The Windsor Plant was built in 1928. In 1939, a special Chrysler royal convertible sedan was built for the 1939 Royal Tour and thousands were shipped overseas. From 1925-1965, vehicles produced at the plant included Plymouth two- and four -door sedans, Dodge hardtops, DeSoto convertibles, Chrysler station wagons and club coupes. Production of the Plymouth Valiant began in 1966 and concluded in 1975. Production of Chrysler Cordoba and Dodge Charger SE began in 1981. Production of minivans began in 1983. The 2005 Chrysler and Dodge minivans with Stow 'n Go® seating and storage system launched production in January 2004, with Swivel 'n Go coming on board in 2007. Chrysler Group recognized 25 years of minivan leadership in 2008 and the 13 millionth minivan was sold in August 2010.

About Chrysler Group LLC

Chrysler Group LLC, formed in 2009 from a global strategic alliance with Fiat S.p.A., produces Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram, SRT, Fiat and Mopar vehicles and products. With the resources, technology and worldwide distribution network required to compete on a global scale, the alliance builds on Chrysler Group's culture of innovation, first established by Walter P. Chrysler in 1925, and Fiat's complementary technology that dates back to its founding in 1899.

Headquartered in Auburn Hills, Mich., Chrysler Group's product lineup features some of the world's most recognizable vehicles, including the Chrysler 300, Jeep Wrangler, Dodge Challenger and Ram 1500. Fiat contributes world-class technology, platforms and powertrains for small- and medium-size cars, allowing Chrysler Group to offer an expanded product line including environmentally friendly vehicles.

Follow Chrysler news and video on:
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/pentastarvideo
Chrysler Connect blog: http://blog.chryslergroupllc.com
Twitter: www.twitter.com/chrysler
Streetfire: http://members.streetfire.net/profile/ChryslerVideo.htm
Corporate website: http://www.chryslergroupllc.com


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  • 31 Comments
      hevace
      • 3 Years Ago
      Thank God someone is looking out for the nation's florists.
      PACMK02
      • 3 Years Ago
      I don't think it's such a bad idea. I'd buy this Ram Van over a Ford Transit Connect anytime. Better engine, better trans, better chassis and probably better materials and assembly quality.
        Mundotaku
        • 3 Years Ago
        @PACMK02
        You also forgot to add that the Ram is built in America while the Ford Transit is made in Turkey.
      24994J
      • 3 Years Ago
      Modern-day Mystery Machine...Hell yeah!!!
      Drew510
      • 3 Years Ago
      Looks like they cost saved and kept the passenger van's interior panels. Would have been nice to see the sides utilized in a different manner (racks/brackets/rails, etc). I doubt those cup holders will get much use.
      who_the
      • 3 Years Ago
      Did they upgrade the brakes for this commercial edition? The brakes on Chrysler minivans have been awful and under-specced for years. I had a front caliper literally melt off of a Dodge Caravan with my whole family inside coming down a long descent a few years ago. Anyone who considers Chrysler minivans should definitely be aware of the feeble brakes they put on these.
        Gary Birch
        • 3 Years Ago
        @who_the
        Use the transmission to slow progress downhill. I transverse %7 grades and seldom use the brakes.
        Frank
        • 3 Years Ago
        @who_the
        I have to second fuzzyfish. I can't comment on the recent minivans but back in the mid to late 80's it was well known that you could do a brake upgrade on the K-car derivatives by getting the calipers off a junkyard minivan because they were bigger than the ones used on the cars. My mid 80's Daytona Turbo had the same minivan sized calipers as well for its "performance" brakes.
        bouljf
        • 3 Years Ago
        @who_the
        I have to agree with you on the brake thing. As a sales rep I've had 2 company Grand Caravans and 2 Journeys, both had issues with the brakes. Same goes for all my colleagues so it's not my driving style.
      Mike
      • 3 Years Ago
      I didn't understand why Ram became its own separate brand and this makes it even more confusing. "I see you bought a new Dodge Caravan." "No I didn't. it's a Ram Cargo Van." "Are you sure? It looks exactly the.... "The windows are covered. Duh. Completely different car."
        Blue Pariah
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Mike
        It's all about proper market segmentation. Sergio is big on having everything in it's neat little place. So the key here is that you've got remember that the Dodge Caravan's days are numbered - the current model will likely be the last. Dodge is going to get a hugely need refocus: Trucks: Gone. Caliber: Gone. Journey/Nitro: Gone. In its place you'll see a sporty little, hatchy Fiat-y thing. (HORNET!!!!) And a sporty Subie-eqse little wagon And a proper, none-band-aid Avenger. Thus: Chrysler - Upscale Mass Market Dodge - Performance/Sport Mass Market Ram: Utility
          Thomas D Hilton III
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Blue Pariah
          The Caravan/Journey isnt going away. both are going towards new platforms. The Carvan might be a MPV style or Tradiational Mini Van while the Town & Country will go the Luxury Crossover Route (think R-Class). The Journey will NEVER leave. it is the best selling American Crossover in Canada and now Italy with the Fiat version. its gettin redesigned and moving to a new Platorm from maybe Fiat if not, Alfa. I Do agree with your other guess's Avenger will ride on a TOTALLY new Alfa Platform that not even in existance The Compact will ride on the Guilietta Platform and of they give it the OK, a Sub Compact will ride on the MiTo Platform so far Dodge- Sport Mass Market Chrysler Upscale Market Ram-Untility Fiat-Youth Brand Alfa Romeo- (so far) Sports Car Market (since Dodge will carry reworked Alfas, theres no need to bring over Afla Small cars to the US). Jeep-SUV Brand
      Elizabeth Ferrari
      • 3 Years Ago
      Really the only thing that comes to mind is the chester the molester van, all they did was white out the windows and it was ugly enough to begin with. Lets realisticaly talk about bluetec sprinters which are far more practical and WAY LESS CREEPY.
      billfrombuckhead
      • 3 Years Ago
      For the vast majority of applications, far better than a compact truck. Better gas mileage, better ride, more safety, more cargo security, easily loads 4x8 sheets of plywood, better handling and a world class Pentastar V6.
        Justin
        • 3 Years Ago
        @billfrombuckhead
        And also bigger than a compact truck.
      Lola Rose
      • 3 Years Ago
      enjoy your limited visibility without a rear window
        letstakeawalk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lola Rose
        You've obviously never been around a fully-loaded cargo van. Drivers learn to use their mirrors, because most of the time the back is full of stuff blocking your view. The window in the tailgate is optional, you can get the van with or without one, depending on your needs. Maybe you need more security, and you'd rather have a metal panel instead of easily broken glass.
        Elmo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lola Rose
        You've never seen a cargo van have you?
        straferhoo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Lola Rose
        LOL@ Lola
      yesaninsider
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sweet rapemobile lol
      Sean Flanagan
      • 3 Years Ago
      Honest question: how can Chrysler produce this in Canada and import it as a cargo van when Ford can't import the Transit Connect as a cargo van? Is it to do with NAFTA, or is it a different class of vehicle?
        spam
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Sean Flanagan
        you got it. NAFTA overrules the chicken tax and many other restrictions on industry
      MOJO Motors
      • 3 Years Ago
      That thing is a mess on wheels. I'll take one this instead. http://bit.ly/oMKGX9
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