Over the weekend, Nissan Canada officially opened the reservation process for the all-electric Leaf. Within two hours, all Canada-bound Model Year 2011 Leafs were reserved. Wow! Two hours!

Here's how the electrifying action went down: At noon on Saturday, Canadian residents who reside within the vicinity of one of the 27 Nissan Leaf certified dealers were invited to reserve the electric hatch for a refundable $99. In just 120 minutes, all of the 2011 Leafs had been snatched up. Judy Wheeler, Nissan Canada's director of marketing, says:
Response from Canadians since we first revealed the Nissan Leaf in 2009 has been astounding, so we're not surprised that our first inventory of 40 model year '11 cars were snapped up so quickly.
Did you catch the kicker? Only 40 Leafs were available, so to have such a limited amount of vehicles vanish so quickly seems unremarkable. Expected? Yes, but not surprising in the least.

Nissan says delivery of the first batch of Leafs to consumers in Canada will begin sometime in September. For Model Year 2012, Nissan will make available just 600 Leafs to buyers in Canada. We're guessing those will sell out in a flash too.
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RESERVATIONS CLOSE FOR FIRST WAVE OF NISSAN LEAF SALES IN CANADA

- First Canadian consumer allocation of Nissan LEAFs reserved within two hours –

Over the weekend, Nissan Canada opened the reservation process for the Nissan LEAF, with all Model Year 11 inventory reserved by Canadian consumers within two hours. At noon on Saturday, August 27th, those registered at www.nissan.ca/leaf and living within the vicinity of one of the 27 Nissan LEAF certified dealers, were invited to reserve a Nissan LEAF, bringing them one step closer to having the all-electric car plugged into their home garage.

"Response from Canadians since we first revealed the Nissan LEAF in 2009 has been astounding so we're not surprised that our first inventory of 40 model year '11 cars were snapped up so quickly," said Judy Wheeler, Director of Marketing, Nissan Canada, Inc. "We expect this momentum to continue when we reopen reservations for model year '12 cars in the coming month, so keep your eyes open for more and more Nissan LEAFs driving around Canadians cities soon."

Delivery to the first wave of consumers will begin in September and continue into the fall. Nissan is carefully managing the purchase process from the first step, when consumers sign up on www.nissan.ca/leaf, until the customer drives the Nissan LEAF home and plugs it into a personal charging dock. Through Model Year 12, Nissan expects to release around 600 Nissan Leaf on the Canadian market through several waves of reservations into next year.

Reservations for Model Year 12 Nissan LEAFs will open in the coming months and be:

Open to those registered at www.nissan.ca/leaf and living within the vicinity of a Nissan LEAF certified dealer. All details, including exact timing for the opening of reservations, will be distributed via email in advance.
A $99 reservation fee (fully refundable) is required to secure a reservation.
After booking a home-charging assessment, customers will receive an invitation to order a Nissan LEAF.
Customers request a quote from a local Nissan LEAF-certified dealer and will continue through the sales process until they drive away in their own Nissan LEAF.

About the Nissan LEAF
One of the industry's most-discussed vehicles for good reason, Nissan LEAF™ is the world's first mass-marketed all-electric car made for the real-world driving needs of consumers and was recently named the 2011 World Car of the Year.

Nissan LEAF is a medium-size hatchback with ample cargo space and seating for five adults comfortably. With a range of 160 kilometres (EPA LA4 cycle) on one full charge, Nissan LEAF provides 90% of Canadians with the range needed for daily commutes. With a 240 volt home charging dock full charge is achieved in seven hours, and with a Level 3 Quick Charger, 80% charge can be achieved in just 26 minutes.

Powered by a lithium-ion battery, Nissan LEAF generates 107 horsepower, 207 lb-ft of torque providing a highly responsive, fun-to-drive experience. Because there's no traditional engine, Nissan LEAF is ultra-quiet and for safety reasons a sound had to be added so pedestrians could hear the car coming. In April, Nissan LEAF was awarded a "Top Safety Pick" rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

The instrument panel provides the driver with regular updates on range and driving efficiency, and using a telematics system called CARWINGS, the driver can communicate with the car via a smart phone with the ability to turn on the air conditioning or heat remotely, and manage and monitor charging.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 31 Comments
      amtoro
      • 3 Years Ago
      This is so unfair at so many levels.... in the US, we reserved our LEAF's in April 2010, had to wait until October in tier 1 states and until the end of July of this year in tier 2 states to order our cars, as of today, will still take 3 to 4 months for delivery, but 40 Canadians can reserve, order and get delivery in one month? Seriously, Nissan?
        Dave R
        • 3 Years Ago
        @amtoro
        It's only 40 LEAFs. Not exactly a lot of them. Kind of like comparing apples and oranges. Nissan is selling all the LEAFs they can build. Supply will get better in 2013 once the Tennessee and UK plants start rolling our EVs.
        Alex Lein
        • 3 Years Ago
        @amtoro
        It's true the wait is much shorter, but the price is much higher (19%). Would you pay $7,000 to have your LEAF delivered within two months? Oh, and act fast too because there are only forty of them. Even next year (for the whole year) Canada will only see 600. I really hope that in 2013 the Tennessee plant will lower the price and provide ample supply.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Alex Lein
          Actually, they get a $8,500 rebate in Ontario. In the US the MSRP is $32,780, in Canada it's $38,395 ($39,285.44 USD by today's rate). So would you pay $31,780 USD (instead of $25,280) to have your LEAF faster?
          Ele Truk
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Alex Lein
          The price isn't higher, just that the Canadians don't get the $7500 tax incentive. So those 40 people, REALLY want to buy those Leafs.
      BipDBo
      • 3 Years Ago
      Nobody wants to buy an EV with limited range because nobody wants to be stranded. Nobody could ever afford a second car they would use in the event of a road trip. EVs are just rich people toys. They'll never succeed.
        John R
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        You're certainly entitled to express your opinion, but I'm also entitled to vote you down ;-)
        John R
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Oh, and one more thing: I'm not rich by any stretch, but my only car is a LEAF and I'm loving it.
          BipDBo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John R
          Good for you. Even before the government subsidies, the Leaf isn't a bad deal when you consider how well equipped it is. It's a great deal when you figure how much money you'll save in fuel. If need be, how far is it to a car rental agency?
        Marco Polo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Now, Now, BipDBO, stop trying to break little DF's disapproval rating! There, look he's about to have one of his little 'moments', I'll get the nurse....
        Dan Frederiksen
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        you're proud to be an american, aren't you : )
        BipDBo
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        Wow, you guys are dense. You couldn't recognize sarcasm is it smacked you in the face with a herring. Honestly, what houshold doesn't have a second car these days?
          BipDBo
          • 3 Years Ago
          @BipDBo
          So an American flag made you assume that I'm anti EV? That's sad. I'm a republican conservationalist. I have a record of being skeptical against the affordability of solar, but I can't wait to get an EV.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          @BipDBo
          ah, it was probably the flag that threw us. and your straight face delivery. and don't you have a record of saying stuff like that?
        krisztiant
        • 3 Years Ago
        @BipDBo
        "Nobody wants to buy an EV..." as you said it. So, how is your post has any relevance to the above news, which claims the opposite: 2011 Nissan Leaf "sells out" in two hours in Canada
      wobrown10
      • 3 Years Ago
      Good job Nissan,How is that Volt doing so far?
      Nick
      • 3 Years Ago
      Only 600 units for entire Canada? Why so low?
      John R
      • 3 Years Ago
      Hey Nissan, I think our friends up north deserve quite a bit more than 40 LEAFs. Seriously. Don't you agree??
      krisztiant
      • 3 Years Ago
      @seanfrlyon29 The EV development is still in its infancy, so I do think an analysis with the title "It's Time to Kill the Electric Car..." is the same as e.g. telling the Wright brothers back in 1903 at their first flight [120 feet (37 m) in 12 seconds, at 6.8 miles per hour (10.9 km/h)] that "It's Time to Kill the airplane..." referring to low speed (6.8 mph / 10.9 km/h) or range anxiety (120 feet / 37 m). Before this flight several scientific analysis said too, that heavier than air flying machines are not possible, so the aforementioned analysis about EVs could have the same fate as the heavier than air flying machines before.
      Randy C
      • 3 Years Ago
      Gosh, maybe Nissan should make a lot more Leafs and stop being so wishy washy. If get 600 units claimed in one day maybe you could make a lot more money if you try to get 1200 units on the market. Nissan could own the EV market and make GM a second rate company, if they only had the huevos to do it!
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      for an ugly, overweight, overpriced EV, that's not bad. some people seem to want EVs. who knew.. 40 might not seem like many but Tesla would kill for that sales rate. I mean just murder somebody : ) as big a fan of EVs as I am, the Leaf is disappointingly conventional and it's priced with disdain so it will never be a real game changer in itself. it'll just be soothing to the very hungry (and financially comfortable). it is further disappointing that they don't make enough of them to meet demand and even more disappointing that they plan to hold on to that dead end vehicle for so long that additional factories come online in 2013. things are moving MUCH too slowly
      Noz
      • 3 Years Ago
      I simply cannot get over the hideousness of this car. WTF were they thinking.
      krisztiant
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'm curious how would John Petersen analyse this news after his yesterday's essay, titled: "It's Time to Kill the Electric Car, Drive a Stake Through its Heart and Burn the Corpse" Probably the poor souls who bought all the Leafs in Canada didn't read his analysis.
        • 3 Years Ago
        @krisztiant
        He would say that 40 people buying this car has virtually no meaning or consequence, and that many people are missing the story. Nissan (and American taxpayers) have invested more than a billion and a half in the Smyrna facility. Nissan have invested almost as much in battery technology and production capability. The total EV tab thus far is over $4B. They acknowledge present battery cost from their JV is about $750/kW-Hr. Carlos Ghosn has openly stated the car will reach breakeven three years into rate production. That's about 450,000 cars (Smyrna is tooled and will be staffed for 150,000 per year). Until then, despite what people consider to be a high price, Nissan is bleeding from this car, and will bleed much more over the next few years. Nissan has lowered projections from 20,000 in the first year to 12,000. You can blame earthquakes all you want, but the fact is they have been unable to sell them as quickly as projected. There are currently more than 350 in inventory across the US, and that number continues to grow. Markets are being introduced ahead of the published plan, and sales still lag. The Leaf is a nice car. Interior space is very good, fit and finish is excellent, ergos are great, it handles well (notwithstanding the chubby EV feel from being 500-700 lb heavier tah an equivalent ICE car). It just doesn't have much utility for most people, especailly for the price. And the price is FAR too low to break even. There's a reason why a Coda, with a Corolla-sized Chinese-built glider and Tianjin-mfg batteries, and a an American-made rolling chassis and drivetrain, will retail for $44,000. Or a Smart for Two EV at over $28,000 in lease payments before you have to give it back, compared to its $15,000 ICE brother. Or a Tesla Roadster at $110,000 against a $55,000 Lotus Elise (which has a higher top speed and about 700lb less mass). Or Fiat 500EVs at $50,000. Or rumored prices of RAV4EV's well over $40,000. There is not a global conspiracy by auto manufacturers. The model doesn't work yet, and a plausible solution doesn't exist. They cost a lot, and unless a huge global entity is willing to fund it from profitable lines (i.e. Nissan), you will pay twice the price of an ICE equivalent. True in Motorcycles as well, with the highest-end Brammo about the same as a Ninja 650 but twice as much to buy. I invite anyone with real sticker prices of anything but the Leaf to prove this wrong. The battery challenge is still too large to be economically overcome, and there is no suitably power and energy dense technology yet that doesn't have a substantial tab associated with its use.
          Marco Polo
          • 3 Years Ago
          I don't agree, but this is certainly a rational and well written opinion.
        krisztiant
        • 3 Years Ago
        @krisztiant
        I forgot to use quotation marks for the "poor souls" and put the /s at the end to indicate the intention of sarcasm.
      Rotation
      • 3 Years Ago
      Here we go, more shenanigans from Nissan. The biggest problem with the LEAF by far is Nissan's bizarre handling of advance sales.
        Ele Truk
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Rotation
        Less bizarre than GM's handling of the Volt. GM has allowed dealers to play shenanegins with Volt pricing, and may contribute greatly to low sales volume. One car locally is listed at $18 over list. Other deals happening like cross selling between dealerships so they get the $7500 tax rebate and not the customer. Nissan has been good enough to limit sales to pretty close what their production is. Once production ramps up, we will see less of the "reservation" process.
          Rotation
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Ele Truk
          No, Nissan has not been good enough to limit sales to pretty close to what their production is. That's the problem. They begged people to order, said keep ordering, keep ordering and then delivered cars late. And this was even before the earthquake. They clearly wanted a big backlog to brag about more than they cared about their actual customers. As to GM dealers playing shenanigans, it does suck, but there's nothing they can do about it. It's not legal for GM to sell the cars directly, they must sell them to the dealers who then sometimes turn around and screw them.
      • 3 Years Ago
      Just saying something stupid on the internet is not enough for everyone to tell that you are being sarcastic.
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