• Aug 27, 2011
eGarage has been teasing us for a while now. We've seen some interesting videos so far, but the website itself had remained light on content. No longer. eGarage is up and running, and the videos are good.

One we like in particular follows the build process of a custom 1950 Mercury coupe. The chopped and slammed project is the work of Zane Cullen and his Cotati Speed Shop, located in Santa Rosa, California. Cullen and his team have already put two years of work into this custom cruiser, and it looks like they might have another year ahead of them. Still, if this partly finished Merc looks this good now, we can't wait to see the final product.

Head over to eGarage.com to check out the video showing the progress made so far.


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    • 1 Second Ago
  • 10 Comments
      Oceanblue78
      • 3 Years Ago
      Still unhappy with Ford for ditching Mercury!
      AngeloD
      • 3 Years Ago
      Sucks to see another classic car vandalized this way. How many "chopped and slammed" primer grey POSs do we need rolling around with, let me guess, one of those "rare" LS7 crate motors. Why can't these no talent clowns stick with after market 56 Bel Air bodys and leave the real classics alone.
        artandcolour2010
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        I totally agree with you Angelo. And how about at least trying to be original with a custom car? '49-'51 Mercurys have been customized since they were new. There are 60 years of Mercury "lead sleds" that have been built. What is REALLY rare to see these days is a completely stock original '49-51 Mercury. Even perfectly restored Mercs of that period are almost never seen. This will just be one more "whatever."
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        [blocked]
        Jarda
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        guess again
        goetzcr
        • 3 Years Ago
        @AngeloD
        Wow. "No talent clowns"? First of all, this Merc is fantastic, not just "chopped and slammed," but a one-off car built and sculpted by craftsmen. This car will have a level of detail, finish, and quality that very few cars have. Second of all, old original cars aren't as rare as you think, so buy one and restore it. Third, many of these hot rods and customs start as cars that would NEVER be restored because they are far too gone to be worth it. A custom guy isn't going to pay a bunch for an original car in great shape if he's only going to use the core. Lastly, this is sporting a prototype cast aluminum blown flathead making upwards of 400 horse. Definitely more rare than an LS7.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Justin Robertson
      • 3 Years Ago
      Looks like it'll turn out to be a great looking car, unfortunately it'll probably take another 2 years to finish.
      Randy
      • 3 Years Ago
      I'd take a 1949 Mercury Coupe Chopped, Slammed and Torched over a new Lambo! It'd have to be MINT though! - Okay, maybe I'd take the Lambo, sell it and buy a Merc and keep the cash too! ;)
      dukeisduke
      • 3 Years Ago
      He says it started out as "a cool '51 Mercury", so is it a '50, or a '51? Looks like just another chopped and channeled Merc. So what? Plus, it's slammed, with air suspension, two more cliches. The one good thing is that it's got a flathead, rather than just another SBC or LS crate motor. How many decent Merc coupes are left, anyway?