• Aug 21, 2011
German firm Siemens has received a major order for its recently launched 22-kW Charge CP700A plug-in vehicle charging station. The order comes from Portugal as part of the nation's Mobi.E electric-mobility consortium.
Siemens says this deal lays the framework for delivery of up to 300 of its Charge CP700A quick-charge stations. Initially, a binding order for 100 of the variable-output (3.7 kW to 22 kW) chargers was placed by Intelli, coordinator of Mobi.E.

Inetelli says it will setup a charging infrastructure network in Portugal and intends to install the 100-plus, Siemens-supplied charging stations in 25 cities by the end of 2012. Most of the quick-charge units will be installed in public parking lots and near shopping centers, hotels and airports. Mobi.E's goal for 2020 is to have in place a charging infrastructure that can easily support at least 600,000 plug-in vehicles.
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Siemens receives major order from Portugal for 100 charging columns for electric vehicles

Electric cars can be charged in an hour at a maximum charging power of 22 kilowatts


Erlangen, Germany, 2011-Aug-18

Siemens has received a major order for its model Charge CP700A charging point from Portugal. As part of the Portuguese program to promote electromobility (MOBI.E), Siemens Portugal concluded a framework agreement for delivery of up to 300 charging points. A binding order for 100 of these charging points was placed immediately by the customer INTELLI, as the coordinator of the Portuguese program. INTELLI is planning the setup of the charging infrastructure network in Portugal and intends to install the charging points in 25 cities by 2012, at public parking lots and near shopping centers, hotels and airports.

Siemens' charging point Charge CP700A can charge electric cars with a normal battery capacity within an hour. The charging power has been doubled to 22 kilowatts in the new series, which cuts the charging time in half.

"I am more than pleased that we received a major order for 100 Charge CP700A charging points so soon after taking up series production of the units. Rapid charging technology is a hot topic", said Ralph Griewing, head of the Siemens business segment Electric Vehicle Infrastructure. The Charge CP700A charging point, which was introduced onto the market in the spring, can be used to charge electric cars of different power ratings. In the fastest operating mode, the vehicle is supplied with a three-phase AC voltage at a current of 32 amps, and is therefore charged at a power level of 22 kilowatts. The normal charging time has now been reduced to one hour with this new charging point series. The goal Siemens has set for itself over the medium term is to develop rapid charging systems with a charging time of less than 15 minutes.

The Charge CP700A charging point uses AC voltage and can be easily integrated into any standard European city grid. The column can also be incorporated into a smart grid and supports functions such as remote control of the charging power to forestall grid bottlenecks and to enable charging explicitly using power from renewable energy sources.​


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  • 15 Comments
      goodoldgorr
      • 3 Years Ago
      These chargers are just a waste of money and a waste of parking spots. An hydrogen infrastructure cost less to build and service more cars because it's occupied for 5 minutes and the refueling last a week or two. With these problematic electric chargers the parking spot is occupied for most of the day while the owner of the car is working nearby and they need it each day. This was a decision from autoblog green to hack the green car market to keep petrol sales at high numbers and kill the economy and especially postpone or just erase hydrogen technology. An hydrogen pump replace 50 or more electric chargers.
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      well it's 22kW max but it's not a DC charger, it's just an AC supply cable and I'm not aware of any EVs yet with the European 3-phase EV plug let alone with a 22kW charger onboard so in effect this will just be level 2 charging. just an extension cord albeit a 3-phase one this time. that said, should there come some EVs with that powerful charger onboard they will be able to charge fairly quickly. good fill of a nissan leaf in an hour (if it had such a charger) or most of an iMiev in half an hour.
      Pat Gatounet
      • 3 Years Ago
      A very good choice from Portugal, that is "future proof", since it will provide fast #2H charging for the next Gen 2X = 50KWH EV Batteries that I'm waiting to jump into the EV with Range Extender fray, that will provide >200KM of real EV range (600KM range as current petrol engines.... Compared to other (stupid) European countries that standardize on 3.7 or 6.7KW chargers (Like my Country = France who also added a ridiculous too small plug to that non-sense) Portugal was right to follow the Germans with this BEST 22KW chargers choice. Only "missing" I found on this 22KW Siemens charger specs when it was announced earlier this year, was that it did not provide all the granularity in Single or Tri-phase charging powers expected (Between 3.7KW Single Phase and 22KW tri-phase, I would have expected 6.7KW and # 12KW at least, never mind if Tri or Single phase, but assume Tri for the latter and both Tri and Single if possible for 6.7KW), so instead of having to charge in #2H the next gen 50KWH at 22KW (Since on 3.7KW it would take 13.5H hence > Overnight), with 6.7KW option it could have been done in
      Dan Frederiksen
      • 3 Years Ago
      it's 3 phase AC, not fast DC, so it's an extension cord albeit a 22kW one. I don't know of any EVs that have the European 3-phase plug yet let alone a 22kW charger onboard so it's basically just slow level 2 charging. that said, should some EVs come around that have such a fast charger it could charge a Leaf in an hour or most of an iMiev in half an hour. if they had such a charger onboard. which they don't. standards are still very much a problem. the latest combi fast charge J1772 proposal is just comical: http://images.thecarconnection.com/med/society-of-automotive-engineers-sae-j-1772-combo-electric-car-charging-plug_100359341_m.jpg
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Dan Frederiksen
        Renault Zoe will be the first with 22 kW charger onboard. Spring 2012. Recharged with half the power that the Leaf, but the point of recharge costs 6 times less.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          Fernando, it doesn't actually say 22kW does it? not that such a charger has to be expensive, it's a fairly simple circuit and can be done at modest price but I don't think they mean 22kW in that case. the price is also the same in their mind for a chademo plug which has no charger electronics at all. so either they are straight up lying or the charger is probably not 22kW. this standards thing will probably be a mess. already is but given how clueless everyone involved is and how many have to agree I fear it will never be reasonably resolved. I'd guess we'll just have a collection of standards for different regions
          Schmart Guy
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Dan, I've read that Renault will be using the regeneration circuit, which is 3 phase, to manage the 22kW charging. Initially it won't be available on the Fluence ZE. From http://www.renault.com/en/vehicules/renault/pages/fluence-ze.aspx it will be available in 2012 or 2013.
          Dan Frederiksen
          • 3 Years Ago
          it takes more expensive charger onboard though. how do you know Zoe will have a 22kW charger?
          • 3 Years Ago
          Dan Frederiksen , 22 kW charger onboard will cost 150 €. Search in google RENAULT ZE AC DC filetype:pdf. Open pdf of DHL and look page 21
      • 3 Years Ago
      400 V / 50 Hz AC, 3 x 32 A... Portuguese seem serious about getting city pollution of the streets, also somewhat pampered with high power. There should be similar EVSE with 3 x 63 A available also (now, or year from now?), unfortunately for Europe (also maybe some IEC-countries) only. IEC meaning a rather global organisation. I wonder if Nissan et al offers these options for their electric vehicles. 2 hour charging, e.g. for a LEAF, is more than enough for movies or some afternoon tea :)
      Spec
      • 3 Years Ago
      The world needs a global quick charge standard ASAP. Otherwise we are going to end up with wasted investments like the AVCON and paddle chargers scattered around California.
        Roy_H
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        Yes but, this seems to be a desirable middle ground at low price. I am beginning to think that the SAE J1772 spec has missed this important option. Right now they have 2 pins for single phase up to 240vac and 2 pins for high power dc. These 4 pins are separated with multiple barriers. I see no sense in this. There will never be a situation where voltage is applied to both pairs of pins simultaneously. So having wide spacing and barriers between seems pointless. In fact it would make more sense to me to combine the functions. The two DC pins are larger to accommodate higher current, so why not re-use for AC? Add a 3rd pin for 3phase AC and you have a more compact plug that can do everything. When plugged in the car would identify the type of charger attached and route the power as required.
          Chris M
          • 3 Years Ago
          @Roy_H
          The problem is that if the car is set up for DC and gets AC, or is set up for AC but gets DC instead, it could cause serious damage to the car and charging outlet.
        skierpage
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        The SAE J1772 people would argue they've come up with exactly that, a global standard that supports AC and DC and is compatible with 2011's EVs. But it siems the Germans are sticking with Mennekes, even though * I can't find any EV actually shipping with the connector. * The German EVs won't arrive in significant numbers until 2013 and even then I doubt any car will have an on-board 22 kW 400V 3-phase charger, despite what Fernando says. * 22 kW 400V 3-phase is a nice match with what European 240V electric supply can provide, but it's way short of DC fast charging at CHAdeMO's 50 kW and the SAE J1772 "combo-coupler"'s 90 kW.
        skierpage
        • 3 Years Ago
        @Spec
        The SAE J1772 people would argue they've come up with exactly that, a global standard that supports AC and DC and is compatible with 2011's EVs. But it siems the Germans are sticking with Mennekes, even though * I can't find any EV actually shipping with the connector. * The German EVs won't arrive in significant numbers until 2013 and even then I doubt any car will have an on-board 22 kW 400V 3-phase charger, despite what Fernando says. * 22 kW 400V 3-phase is a nice match with what European 240V electric supply can provide, but it's way short of DC fast charging at CHAdeMO's 50 kW and the SAE J1772 "combo-coupler"'s 90 kW.
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