For as long as anyone can remember, Bugatti has been a one-model marque. For the past seven years, that model has been the Veyron. Before that, it was the EB110. In the 1950s, it was the Type 101. In fact, you'd have to go back to the late 30s to find more than one line of vehicles coming out of Molsheim, when the Type 57, Type 46 and Type 55 all shared the same facility. But that could come about again if Wolfgang Dürheimer gets his way.

The former Porsche R&D chief who recently took the reigns at Bugatti and Bentley says that, even with the Veyron's lifecycle running at a characteristically rapid pace towards the setting sun, the company has yet to finalize plans for its successor. The four-door Galibier is the leading option, but Dürheimer reportedly isn't satisfied leaving it there.

According to reports, the Bugatti chief would like to see a proper successor to the Veyron joining the Galibier in the company's product portfolio. Of course, that's what his predecessor wanted, too, but maybe Dürheimer will have better luck extracting the necessary funding from the Volkswagen board to make a two-model Bugatti line-up a possibility.


I'm reporting this comment as:

Reported comments and users are reviewed by Autoblog staff 24 hours a day, seven days a week to determine whether they violate Community Guideline. Accounts are penalized for Community Guidelines violations and serious or repeated violations can lead to account termination.


    • 1 Second Ago
  • 12 Comments
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      Charles
      • 3 Years Ago
      there are what 150 people in the world that really care about this...LOL
      soundbargaming
      • 3 Years Ago
      They said the Bugatti couldn't be done. You did it. They say real Jetson-like flying cars can't be done. Do it.
        Krishan Mistry
        • 3 Years Ago
        @soundbargaming
        We just need to find some damn antigravity and then everything could fly.
      TJ Wenger
      • 3 Years Ago
      The thing is, Those that can buy just one of these cars, Can afford to buy another. So why not sell a set if you can? I'm not a fan at any level of the Veyron, But I see the business case. Manufacturing will be easy peasy across both models. Oil Prince's love things that match and guzzle gas. It seems like a winner to me.
        John Hughan
        • 3 Years Ago
        @TJ Wenger
        The business case falls down because even though the Veyron costrs $1.5-2 million, each one costs $6 million to produce. VW has accepted huge losses on these because of the prestige factor of having the world's fastest accelerating, fastest traveling, highest horsepower, most expensive, most luxurious production car available -- and also to prove that it could be done.
          Georgie Porgie
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John Hughan
          So then splitting the production cost between two options would help that no ? You aren't going to re-engineer every single little part again after all.
          • 3 Years Ago
          @John Hughan
          [blocked]
      rmkensington
      • 3 Years Ago
      One of them is ugly enough.
      • 3 Years Ago
      [blocked]
      black republican
      • 3 Years Ago
      First of all, I hate fastbacks. The Panamera, to me, is an ugly car - not to mention much too small in the inside to be a car I'd ever want to own. This Veyron 4 door looks like it's gonna be the same basic design, but a whole lot more money. I'd rather just buy another S550 or even an S63. Sure Bugatti can handle a 2 car lineup. They are basically using a lot of the same parts.
      jefe loco
      • 3 Years Ago
      Um, slight correction, Dürheimer took the "reins" rather than "reigns". Stupid homonyms!